Dominion of Southern America - Updated November 29, 2017

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Glen, Feb 22, 2010.

Tags:
  1. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    The Confederationist Flag of East Florida took the rather interesting approach of taking the new Confederation of Southern America flag and fusing it with the old Cross of Burgandy that had flown over Florida in the Spanish era to create their banner.

    Confederationist East Florida Flag.png
     
  2. scholar Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2010
    Location:
    United States
    I wonder how many people will think that the State of Jacques is named after Jean-Jacques Rousseau? If I remember correctly the river was originally named after a Saint, but Rousseau fits better than the Saint.
     
  3. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Larger, yes, but larger when is the question.
     
  4. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Well, its a bit more of a population than that, but not dramatic population.
     
  5. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    See my earlier comment - and I will get to commenting on an possible 'American Memphis' in Kentucky.

    Yep, you're drunk! But thanks nonetheless.:)
     
  6. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Location:
    Virginia - near the USA-CSSA Border
    Quite a bit actually... that makes up a good chunk of what we would know as the populated part of the Dakotas... what does that mean for the western part of the Dakotas? Perhaps a Lakota majority state of some sort?
     
  7. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Location:
    Virginia - near the USA-CSSA Border
    The founder of Korsgaardism strikes again :D

    Any hints at what this city will be named/called?
     
  8. The Admiral Hook M*thaf*ckin' Radical...

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2010
    Location:
    Jhedir-Annarrh
    It almost has to be Paducah. I see it going this way, and Glen correct me if I'm wrong. The details are yours alone, of course:

    Not long after the POD a thriving community emerged at the confluence of the Tennessee and Ohio rivers on the Mississippi, a town called Pekin, as in OTL. Originally made up of natives and settlers alike, the town receives an influx of U.S. friendly Southern settlers after the revolution and, as a western settlement bordering the South and on a major trade river, receives an influx of Northern troops and in a short time, a naval base.

    Now, the name can remain Pekin if you like, but I'd prefer anything but Paducah (my father is from there and I always hated the name).

    Being in an even more critical location militarily TTL, I could see Fort Massac being repopulated (and renamed) and expanded, resulting in twin military base cities with ideal trade locations while also serving as a springboard to the west and a vital stop on Southern slaves' route to the north.

    Following the Slaver uprising, I can see Southern expats once again settling in and around this area as well, leading initially to tensions with the high free black population but eventually resulting in a diverse cultural blend akin to OTL's Memphis.

    As two culturally diverse port cities, one downriver from the other, I can see New London and this unnamed Twin City urban area becoming sister cities during times of good feeling between North and South...

    Am I far offbase?
     
  9. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    St. Louis is definitely even more important (and big) ITTL than in our own.

    Hmm, Cape Girardeau, what an interesting thought....:rolleyes:
     
  10. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    The Industrial Age initially ran on iron. For many uses iron was adequate, but for the burgeoning dreams of the 19th century, only steel would do. However, steel was difficulty to produce, and the quantities produced easily outstripped demand by the 1840s, spurring a race for a means to mass produce steel.

    One of the first successes in steel production was achieved by young immigrant and inventor William 'Steel Bill' Hauxwell. He grew up in Yorkshire and migrated to the United States as a teen in the 1830s, wanting to avoid the troubles in British Southern America. He settled in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania a hotbed of ironworking. He was a self-made man, who came up with the idea of bubbling air from underneath molten iron to keep down fuel costs, but in the process found the process produced a goodly quantity of steel. The Hauxwell Process became the pre-eminent method of creating steal during the 1840s.
    [​IMG]
     
  11. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    It does seem somewhat perplexing - poor name perhaps?

    Ah, Metropolis? Such a cosmopolitan name...

    Ft. Massac actually develops relatatively the same - it's close, but not close enough, to the border to be a major outpost.

    That would be funny! Of course, Big Ben is likely to have been butterflied away....

    I don't think you are far off.:cool:
     
  12. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    That's funny! I could see it get started as folk etymology, and be a 'common misconception' in the USA!!
     
  13. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    The Confederationist flag of West Florida, while inspired by the earlier flag developed by East Florida, took a more traditional approach. A simple quartered field superimposing the Confederation of Southern America flag and the old Cross of Burgundy.

    Confederationist West Florida Flag.png
     
  14. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Yes. Despite Jacques being somewhat oddly shaped, it makes for a pretty good state in terms of similar terrain and issues. The other side of the Missouri really is a whole new world.

    First probably means a delay in statehood for that section of the USA. A Lakota majority depends on how they react to the USA love it or leave it (to Hudson Territory) policy. IF they agree to assimilate and become US taxpaying citizens, then they will make up a good chunk initially. If they do not want to be assimilated, and insist on being a separate nation, they will have to fight (and lose, let's face it) or move north.

    Yes, this USA is a bit like the Borg....:eek:
     
  15. thekingsguard Founder of Korsgaardianism

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Location:
    Virginia - near the USA-CSSA Border
    The Lakota always struck me as one of the tribes more sympathetic to assmiliation. Of course, who can tell?

    Yes, a Borg of racially-tolerent freedom lovers :p
     
  16. The Admiral Hook M*thaf*ckin' Radical...

    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2010
    Location:
    Jhedir-Annarrh
    Mind=Blown.
     
  17. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Indeed - now, hints would be spoilers!:rolleyes:
     
  18. Tsao Banned

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2011
    Location:
    Washington
    Speaking of Korsgaardism, what's going on in Prussia-Poland at the moment?
     
  19. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Pekin seems fun - anyone know how it would be pronounced?

    It's a bit back from the border for that, I suspect.

    Where are you talking about, the site of OTL Paducah?

    Maybe....

    Time will tell how it really is, but your thoughts are pretty solid I think.
     
  20. Glen ASB & Left Hand of IAN Moderator

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2005
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    Empress Elizabeth II of the British Empire, Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, it was initially feared, might follow in the footsteps of her illustrious namesake, Elizabeth I, as an unmarried monarch. The names of suitors from the Empires of Scandinavia and Germany were the lead contenders as having appropriate ranking scions of the Protestant faith. A dark horse candidate was a younger member of the French Royal Family (presumably if willing to convert). However, in quick succession the Queen-Empress refused all matches. She was a strong willed, vivacious woman, perhaps best loved from afar, some said. Her advocacy for increasing women's rights in the British Empire and rather liberal views on arts, dress, and religion, was seen as detriments to potential matches.

    However, the Empress had other plans for her future. She met and fell in love with the handsome young Scottish 13th Earl of Strathmore and Kinghome, Thomas Lyon-Bowes. Initially, her wish to marry was opposed by Parliament and the Archbishop of Canterbury. However, with the election of a new majority Liberal government in 1864 coupled with the death of the previous Archbishop and the Elizabeth's appointment of a more sympathetic occupant to the post, Elizabeth and her allies pushed through both temporal and secular approval of her love match, and for the first time since 1515, a British Subject married into the the direct line of the Sovereign. While Thomas was only recognized as Consort to the Empress, their children would have full rights of inheritance to the British throne.
    [​IMG]