As Dreamers Do: American Magic Redux

Professional Sports as of 1961
  • Professional Sports as of 1961

    Baseball
    American League

    Baltimore Orioles
    Boston Red Sox
    Chicago White Sox
    Cleveland Indians
    Detroit Tigers
    Kansas City Athletics
    New York Yankees
    Texas Rangers (Formerly Washington Senators)

    National League
    Brooklyn Dodgers
    Chicago Cubs
    Cincinnati Reds
    Milwaukee Braves
    Minnesota Twins
    Philadelphia Phillies
    Pittsburgh Pirates
    St. Louis Cardinals

    Pacific Coast League
    Hollywood Stars
    Los Angeles Angels
    Portland Beavers
    Sacramento Solons
    San Diego Padres
    San Francisco Seals
    Seattle Rainiers
    Vancouver Mounties

    FOOTBALL
    National Football League
    Eastern Division

    Dallas Cowboys
    Cleveland Browns
    New York Giants
    Philadelphia Eagles
    Pittsburgh Steelers
    St. Louis Cardinals
    Washington Redskins

    Western Division
    Baltimore Colts
    Chicago Bears
    Detroit Lions
    Green Bay Packers
    Los Angeles Rams
    Minnesota Vikings
    San Francisco 49ers

    American Football League
    Eastern Division

    Boston Patriots
    Buffalo Bills
    Houston Oilers
    New York Titans

    Western Division
    Dallas Texans
    Denver Broncos
    Oakland Raiders
    San Diego Chargers

    Canadian Football League
    Eastern Division

    Hamilton Tiger Cats
    Montreal Alouettes
    Ottawa Rough Riders
    Toronto Argonauts

    Western Division
    BC Lions
    Calgary Stampeders
    Edmonton Eskimos
    Saskatchewan Roughriders
    Winnipeg Blue Bombers

    BASKETBALL
    National Basketball Association
    Eastern Division

    Boston Celtics
    New York Knicks
    Philadelphia Warriors
    Syracuse Nationals

    Western Division
    Chicago Zephyrs
    Cincinnati Royals
    Detroit Pistons
    Los Angeles Lakers
    St. Louis Hawks

    HOCKEY
    National Hockey League

    Boston Bruins
    Chicago Blackhawks
    Detroit Red Wings
    Montreal Canadiens
    New York Rangers
    Toronto Maple Leafs
     
    Animation Studio Power Rankings as of 1961-62
  • Walt Disney Productions
    Unable to acquire the film rights to Rudyard Kipling's Jungle Book, the studio proceeds full steam ahead on production of Chanticleer, The Sword in the Stone, Mary Poppins and Alice in Wonderland. Release dates for these titles have yet to be announced.

    Hanna-Barbera
    The Flintstones continues to pay big dividends in primetime, but Top Cat would probably perform better on Saturday mornings. Hoping to capitalize on the Flintstone momentum, the studio will launch The Jetsons in primetime for the Fall 1962 season.

    Jay Ward
    Rocky and Bullwinkle are still a major hit on television. George of the Jungle is still about five years away at the most.

    Warner Bros. Cartoons
    WB is still cranking out theatrical shorts, but it appears that the halcyon days of the Looney Tunes appear to be over.

    Famous Studios
    At this point, Famous has pivoted full time towards television. Under the watchful eye of Al Brodax, Tintin and a new Popeye series are the moneymakers for Famous so far. Famous's newest character, Deputy Dawg, debuts in Fall '62.

    Bob Clampett Productions
    Beany and Cecil have finally spun off from Matty's Funday Funnies.

    Grantray-Lawrence
    Most of GL's output so far has consisted of commercials. The Planet Patrol pilot still went unsold.

    Rembrandt Films
    After being let go by Famous Studios, Gene Deitch moved to Prague to join this studio. MGM somehow managed to get the Tom and Jerry cartoons back up and running with Deitch, but the studio's head of production Joe Vogel has been on the hotseat after a few expensive live action flops.

    UPA
    Henry G. Saperstein, a notorious bean counter, is counting on Gay Purr-ee to be successful enough to keep UPA going. But so far, Mister Magoo is still the lone cash cow for this studio.

    Sib Tower 12 Productions
    Chuck Jones and his business partner Les Goldman have formed this little outfit after Chuck was laid off by Warner Bros. Just a year or so ago, Chuck was producing some Little Audrey, Baby Huey and Herman and Katnip shorts for Fox on a freelance basis.
     
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    The First Corporate Takeover
  • George Lucas (From the 2004 documentary A Legacy of Filmmakers)
    "The old time entrepreneurs that built the studios were leaving. The corporations were taking them over. So there was a lot of chaos in the industry at that point."

    Martin Scorsese (From the 2004 documentary A Legacy of Filmmakers)
    "The old system was finally gone. It was finally gone."

    In 1962, the Music Corporation of America (MCA) completed its purchase of Universal Pictures, an acquisition that was almost a decade in the making. Years earlier, MCA had acquired the pre-1953 Walter Lantz cartoon library when Lantz decided to merge his cartoon studio with Fleischer-Terry to form Famous Studios.

    Speaking of Famous Studios, the Miami-based cartoon factory has also been sold to MCA. That purchase alone gives both parties more than a few perks. For starters, Famous will move onto the Universal backlot. Second, Walter Lantz, Al Brodax and Richard Fleischer will each become three of MCA's larger shareholders behind Wasserman. Third, Universal Pictures will finally have full custody of Woody Woodpecker and the rest of Walter Lantz's characters after only having the distribution rights just two decades earlier.



    At the center of MCA's aggressive expansion was Lew Wasserman (above), who succeeded Jules Stein as MCA's chairman at the end of World War II. Under Wasserman's watch, MCA is currently building a new headquarters building along Lankershim Boulevard, overlooking the Universal lot.

    And if you thought Wasserman was finished, he has more on his shopping list. Against his predecessor's wishes, Wasserman has his eyes on purchasing a 50% stake in the Los Angeles Rams football club from Dan Reeves as early as 1963.


    Wasserman watches his predecessor Jules Stein sign his name on a steel beam before the topping out ceremony for MCA Tower.


    MCA Tower under construction on the right.

    Starting in the summer of 1964, Universal will offer tours of its vast backlot for the first time since the Silent Era.
     
    The Jetsons (1962 TV series)
  • The Jetsons

    Launched on September 23, 1962 on ABC

    Sponsored by
    3M

    Production Company
    Hanna-Barbera

    Voices
    George O'Hanlon as George Jetson
    Daws Butler as Elroy Jetson and Spencer Cogswell
    Penny Singleton as Jane Jetson
    Janet Waldo as Judy Jetson
    Jean Vander Pyl as Rosie
    Mel Blanc as Mr. Spacely
    Don Messick as Astro and RUDI
    Howard Morris as Henry Orbit
     
    Nara Disneyland (1963 Theme Park)
  • Nara Disneyland


    Nara Disneyland opened its gates on February 14, 1963. Under the compromise that was reached a year earlier, the Matsuo Entertainment Company would actually own the theme park while Walt Disney Productions, through its WED subsidiary, maintained creative control.

    @Light_Star 1
    Most of the stuff at Nara is pretty much the same, but with Disney's involvement, they should be okay moneywise.​
     
    The Sword in the Stone (1963 Film)
  • The Sword in the Stone
    Released by Walt Disney on December 25, 1963

    Narration by Liev Schreiber (From the documentary Walt Disney: An American Original)

    "Walt Disney acquired the film rights to T.H. White's novel The Sword in the Stone in February 1939, but production would not officially begin until after World War II. Storyboards and character concepts would be thrown around on and off during the postwar period."

    "After 20 years of development, Walt finally greenlit The Sword in the Stone for a December 1963 release. Unfortunately, the assassination of John F. Kennedy overshadowed the film's premiere."



    Walt Disney, Jr. (1985 interview on Good Morning America)
    "I was sending applications to USC, UCLA and Calarts when Dad said he needed a voice for Arthur. There was another actor they tried for that character. His name was Rickie Sorensen. I didn't find out till years later that his voice changed halfway through. So, Dad and Woolie Reitherman had to scramble to find another boy to do the voice, and I sheepishly asked Dad if I could try it. I recorded my lines in maybe three or four days."

    Directed by
    Wolfgang Reitherman

    Story by
    Bill Peet

    Based on the book by
    T.H. White

    Voices
    Walt Disney, Jr. [1] as Arthur
    Karl Swenson as Merlin
    Martha Wentworth as Mad Madam Mim
    Junius Matthews as Archimedes
    Sebastian Cabot as Sir Ector
    Norman Alden as Kay
    Alan Napier as Pelinore

    [1] Billed as "Junior."

    Animators
    Milt Kahl
    Frank Thomas
    Ollie Johnston
    John Lounsbery
    Cliff Nordberg
    Hal Ambro
    John Sibley
    Hal King
    Eric Larson
    Eric Cleworth
    Whitey Larkin [2]
    Helen O'Grady [2]

    [2] Fictional artist​
     
    1964 at Disney
  • 1964 New York World's Fair


    At the 1964 New York World's Fair, Disney produced four exhibits that enabled Walt to expand the technology of attractions at Disneyland and Disney parks yet to built.





    Mary Poppins

    Released on August 27, 1964 by Walt Disney.

    That same year, Walt released a film considered by many to be his crowning achievement. Mary Poppins would go on to become the biggest box office hit of 1964-65. It would also take home five Oscars, including Best Actress for Julie Andrews and Best Song for Chim Chim Cher-ee.

    Also in 1964, Walt reached an agreement with Anheuser-Busch, clearing the way for Budweiser to become the official beer of Riverfront Square. The indoor park is slated to open in 1966 along with a new ballpark for the Cardinals.


    Although few people knew it, Walt was already forming multiple shell companies to buy up parcels of land in Florida for a secret project.


    In the midst of all this, Walt Disney, Jr., now 18, graduated from John Burroughs High School and was accepted into the University of Southern California's School of Cinematic Arts.​
     
    State of Animation in 1965
  • Walt Disney Productions will debut a new logo in 1965 to coincide with the tenth anniversary of Disneyland. The studio has two animated films lined up to close out the decade. Chanticleer will see theatres in 1967, followed by Alice in Wonderland in 1969. Outside of animation, Disney narrowly survived a hostile takeover attempt that would've merged the company with DC Comics and Motown Records. The identity of the individual or corporation behind the takeover attempt will be revealed soon.

    Famous Studios is pretty much one of the Last of the Mohicans when it comes to theatrical shorts. Hector Heathcote, Woody Woodpecker and Chilly Willy are the last remaining theatrical short series still continuously being produced. Bob Kuwahara, who created Hashimoto-san for the studio, passed away last year at the age of just 63. With Al Brodax in charge of television animation, Famous will launch The Beatles and Cool McCool in 1966. For 1968, Famous will release its first animated feature in 24 years, The Beatles' Yellow Submarine. Another ace in the hole for Famous is a guy named Ralph Bakshi.

    Sib Tower 12 is now MGM Animation/Visual Arts. After Chuck Jones's deal with Fox expired, he moved onto MGM, where he has helped revive the Tom and Jerry series for theatrical shorts. Also on the big screen, Jones is hard at work on The Jungle Book, which will debut in 1967 [1]. Other upcoming projects: How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966; TV special), The Bear that Wasn't (1967; short).

    [1] The Chuck Jones/MGM Jungle Book will be an earlier adaptation of Jones' Kipling material; Rikki-Tikki-Tavi, Mowgli's Brothers and The White Seal, which aired on TV in the mid 70's IOTL. It will also be one of the few MGM films to carry the abstract blue and gold lion logo that was used IOTL in 2001: A Space Odyssey.

    Grantray-Lawrence has been doing commercials for about eleven years now, but now, Marvel has licensed their superheroes for GL to produce two series for Saturday morning TV; The Marvel Super Heroes for Fall 1966 and Spider-Man for Fall 1967.

    With the Flintstones and Jetsons both wrapping up their original runs, there's still a ton more projects being churned out by Hanna-Barbera. The Atom Ant/Secret Squirrel Show and Sinbad Jr and the Magic Belt will debut on the small screen in Fall '65. In addition, HB is negotiating with Marge Buell on a possible Little Lulu series for 1968.

    Superman makes his return to animation thanks to a new series being produced by Filmation for the Fall '66 season.

    After the Rocky and Bullwinke Show wrapped up its original run, Jay Ward has moved on to his newest character, Hoppity Hooper.

    Keep an eye out for Hal Seeger's Milton the Monster, coming to ABC-TV in Fall '65. Batfink debuts in Fall '66.

    Total Television is going strong with Underdog and Tennessee Tuxedo. Coming in Fall 1966: The Beagles.
     
    A Charlie Brown Christmas (1965 TV Special)
  • A Charlie Brown Christmas


    First aired on December 9, 1965 on CBS.

    Based on the comic strip Peanuts by
    Charles M. Schulz

    Directed by
    Bill Melendez

    Produced by
    Bill Melendez
    Lee Mendelson

    Music
    Vince Guaraldi

    Voices
    Peter Robbins as Charlie Brown
    Chris Shea as Linus Van Pelt
    Tracy Stratford as Lucy Van Pelt
    Cathy Steinberg as Sally Brown
    Chris Doran as Schroeder and Shermy
    Katherine Mendelson as Patty [1]
    Geoffrey Ornstein as Pig-Pen
    Sally Dryer as Violet
    Anne Altieri as Frieda
    Bill Melendez as Snoopy

    [1] Not to be confused with Peppermint Patty​
     
    Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree (1966 short)
  • Winnie the Pooh and the Honey Tree


    Released by Walt Disney on February 4, 1966. Originally billed with the live action feature The Ugly Dachshund.

    Based on the books by
    A.A. Milne

    Directed by
    Wolfgang Reitherman

    Music by
    Buddy Baker

    Songs by
    Robert B. Sherman
    Richard M. Sherman

    Voices
    Sebastian Cabot as the narrator
    Sterling Holloway as Winnie the Pooh
    Junius Matthews as Rabbit
    Hal Smith as Owl
    Howard Morris as Gopher
    Barbara Luddy as Kanga
    Clint Howard as Roo
    Bruce Reitherman as Christopher Robin​
     
    Pro Sports Finally Arrives in the South
  • The Braves led the way in ushering a brief relocation boom in baseball. Although the Braves never recorded a losing season in Milwaukee, attendance at County Stadium started to slide by the early Sixties. Around 1944, Lou Perini bought the Braves while they were still in Boston before moving the club to Milwaukee in 1953. By 1963, Perini suddenly sold the team to the LaSalle Corporation, led by Bill Bartholomay. After numerous attempts to revive fan support in Milwaukee failed, Bartholomay turned his attention to moving the Braves elsewhere.

    Atlanta was going to get major league sports sooner or later. That was a fact. No team looking to move was stupid enough to turn down the corporate support promised by Coca-Cola.

    The dream for Atlanta came true when the Braves arrived in 1966. That same year, the Falcons were accepted into the National Football League.



    @Colonel Zoidberg
    1966 also saw the addition of the Miami Dolphins into the upstart American Football League, making the Dolphins the very first professional sports franchise in the state of Florida.

     
    Riverfront Square Opens!
  • Riverfront Square


    After a few years of negotiations and planning, Disney finally opened Riverfront Square on June 10, 1966. Walt Disney, Jr. had just completed his sophomore year at USC in time to join his father and Uncle Roy for the ribbon cutting ceremony. Also there were Anheuser-Busch CEO Gussie Busch, Missouri governor Warren Hearnes and St. Louis mayor Alfonso Cervantes.

    Dedication Plaque:

    RIVERFRONT SQUARE
    Dedicated June 10, 1966

    FOUNDING PARTNERS
    Walt Disney Productions
    Anheuser-Busch, Inc.
    Ralston-Purina Company
    McDonnell Aircraft Corporation
    Edward D. Jones & Co.
    Trans World Airline Corporation

    Attractions

    There wasn't really an icon for Riverfront Square except for a marquee outside the park. The park was designed to be indoors so that the park stayed open on rainy days.


    The street level of Riverfront Square is divided into two halves. In Old St. Louis, a Mark Twain Riverboat serves as an all-ages restaurant while the Budweiser Lounge offers a place for the adults to kick back and relax. The main attraction of Old St. Louis is the Lewis and Clark Adventure, which takes guests on a canoe ride through a mythological version of the treacherous expedition.

    Over in New Orleans Square, you might see the Jambalaya Jazz Band serenade guests. The main attractions of this realm are the Blue Bayou Restaurant and the Pirates of the Caribbean ride.





    The midlevel section of the park, located one floor below the street level, consists of two Circarama Theatres, two dark rides and an audio-animatronic theatre.

    Dark rides
    The Haunted Mansion
    Adventure Thru Innerspace (Sponsored by Monsanto)

    Audio Animatronic Theatre
    Great Moments with Mr. Lincoln

    Circarama Theatres
    America The Beautiful
    Davy Crockett's Greatest Adventures


    The basement level serves as the "show buildings" for Pirates of the Caribbean and the Lewis and Clark Adventure.

    TRIVIA
    @Nivek
    A month earlier, Busch Memorial Stadium opened, replacing Sportsman's Park as the home both the baseball and football Cardinals.
     
    Paramount Engulfed!


  • By mid-1966, Paramount Pictures was in trouble. The former member of the "Big Five" was now a shell of its former self. The 1948 consent decree forced Paramount and other studios to sell off their former theatre chains. In the years that followed, the studio had to sell some assets just to stay in business.

    Paramount already survived one takeover attempt by Chris-Craft Industries, but they couldn't escape the grasp of Charles Bluhdorn and his Gulf+Western firm. It was Bluhdorn that attempted a simultaneous hostile takeover of Walt Disney Productions, DC Comics and Motown Records a year ago, only to for all three to fight back.

    With Paramount now under his control, Bluhdorn has Desilu circled next on his shopping list. Such a purchase would be convenient since Desilu is just next door to Paramount on the former RKO lot.

    Gulf+Western's purchase of Paramount won't be the last corporate takeover, as the AVCO Corporation already has its eyes on the tiny Embassy Pictures studio. Taft Broadcasting has already bought Hanna-Barbera. Practically, most of the other Hollywood studios still running independently are ripe for corporate takeovers as the Golden Age entrepreneurs have either passed away or are retiring.​
     
    The biggest TV hits of '66


  • The first season of Batman ran on ABC in the Spring of 1966. Later that summer, a feature film was made. By this time, DC Comics, known at the time as National Periodical Publications, had survived a hostile takeover that would've merged the company with Walt Disney Productions and Motown Records.



    Narration by Leonard Nimoy (From the documentary Star Trek Memories)
    "Pitched by Gene Roddenberry as "Wagon Train to the stars," Star Trek launched on NBC on the evening of September 8, 1966. At the same time as the series' debut, production company Desilu sought to fend off a takeover attempt by Gulf+Western. Despite low expectations, Star Trek became another successful addition to Desilu's television portfolio along with Mannix and Mission Impossible."

     
    How the Grinch Stole Christmas (1966 TV Special)
  • How the Grinch Stole Christmas


    First aired on December 18, 1966 on CBS

    Production Company
    MGM Animation/Visual Arts

    Directed by
    Chuck Jones
    Ben Washam

    Story
    Dr. Seuss
    Based on his book

    Voices
    Boris Karloff as the Narrator and the Grinch
    June Foray as Cindy Lou Who

    Musical Score by
    Eugene Poddany

    "You're a Mean One, Mr. Grinch"
    Music by

    Albert Hague

    Lyrics by
    Dr. Seuss

    Sung by
    Thurl Ravenscroft

    Animation
    Ken Harris
    Lloyd Vaughn
    Don Towsley
    Richard Thompson
    Tom Ray
    Phil Roman​
     
    The State of Animation as of 1967
  • Animation as of 1967...

    MGM Animation/Visual Arts is hard at work on The Jungle Book, which will be in theatres in Thanksgiving 1967. Thanks to the success of How the Grinch Stole Christmas, Dr. Seuss will have Horton Hears a Who available to MGM for a 1970 debut.

    Hanna-Barbera has reached an agreement with Marjorie Buell for the rights to produce a Little Lulu series, which is expected to air on Saturday mornings starting in Fall '67.

    20th Century Fox has hired Filmation to produce a revival of its Movietoon characters for a new TV series expected in Fall '67.

    Yellow Submarine, starring and featuring the music of The Beatles, is still on track to become Universal Pictures' first feature animated film since Walter Lantz's 1949 clunker Hans Brinker.

    DePatie-Freleng is still making cartoons for Warner Bros., but now with Seven Arts interested in merging with WB, it looks like DFE's partnership with Warners may be nearing its end.

    Grantray-Lawrence's failure to gain any real traction has come back to bite them hard. The first season of Spider-Man may very well be GL's last hurrah unless a miracle happens.

    Walt Disney Productions is still on track to release Chanticleer in 1967, with country superstar Roger Miller assuming the titular role.​
     
    Professional Sports as of 1967
  • Major League Baseball
    American League
    Eastern Division

    Baltimore Orioles
    Boston Red Sox
    Chicago White Sox
    Cleveland Indians
    Detroit Tigers
    New York Yankees

    Western Division
    Los Angeles Angels (From PCL)
    Oakland Athletics (Formerly Kansas City)
    Portland Beavers (From PCL)
    Seattle Rainiers (From PCL)
    Texas Rangers
    Vancouver Mounties (From PCL; Formerly Oakland Oaks; Moved in 1956)

    National League
    Eastern Division

    Atlanta Braves (Formerly Milwaukee; Moved in 1966)
    Brooklyn Dodgers
    Cincinnati Reds
    Minnesota Twins (Formerly New York Giants; Moved in 1958)
    Philadelphia Phillies
    Pittsburgh Pirates

    Western Division
    Chicago Cubs
    Hollywood Stars (From PCL)
    Houston Astros (From PCL; Formerly Sacramento Solons; Moved in 1962)
    San Diego Padres (From PCL)
    San Francisco Seals (From PCL)
    St. Louis Cardinals

    National Football League
    Eastern Conference
    Capitol

    Dallas Cowboys
    New York Giants
    Philadelphia Eagles
    Washington Redskins

    Century
    Cleveland Browns
    New Orleans Saints (Expansion)
    Pittsburgh Steelers
    St. Louis Cardinals

    Western Conference
    Central

    Chicago Bears
    Detroit LIons
    Green Bay Packers
    Minnesota Vikings

    Coastal
    Atlanta Falcons
    Baltimore Colts
    Los Angeles Rams
    San Francisco 49ers

    American Football League
    Eastern Division

    Boston Patriots
    Buffalo Bills
    Cincinnati Bengals (Expansion)
    Miami Dolphins
    New York Jets

    Western Division
    Denver Broncos
    Houston Oilers
    Kansas City Chiefs
    Oakland Raiders
    San Diego Chargers

    Canadian Football League
    Eastern Division

    Hamilton Tiger Cats
    Montreal Alouettes
    Ottawa Rough Riders
    Toronto Argonauts

    Western Division
    BC Lions
    Calgary Stampeders
    Edmonton Eskimos
    Saskatchewan Roughriders
    Winnipeg Blue Bombers

    National Basketball Association
    Eastern Division

    Baltimore Bullets
    Boston Celtics
    Cincinnati Royals
    Detroit Pistons
    New York Knicks
    Philadelphia 76ers

    Western Division
    Chicago Bulls
    Los Angeles Lakers
    San Diego Rockets (Expansion)
    San Francisco Warriors
    Seattle Supersonics (Expansion)
    St. Louis Hawks

    American Basketball Association
    Eastern Division

    Indiana Pacers
    Kentucky Colonels
    Minnesota Muskies
    New Jersey Americans
    Pittsburgh Pipers

    Western Division
    Dallas Chaparrals
    Denver Nuggets
    Houston Mavericks
    Los Angeles Stars
    Oakland Oaks

    National Hockey League
    Eastern Division

    Boston Bruins
    Chicago Blackhawks
    Detroit Red Wings
    Montreal Canadiens
    New York Rangers
    Toronto Maple Leafs

    Western Division (All Expansion)
    Los Angeles Kings
    Minnesota North Stars
    Oakland Seals
    Philadelphia Flyers
    Pittsburgh Penguins
    St. Louis Blues
     
    Tomorrowland (1967 Renovation)


  • Tomorrowland Renovation
    Disneyland Park
    Anaheim, California

    New Attractions
    Adventures thru Inner Space
    Flight to the Moon
    Carousel of Progress
    Rocket Jets
    People Mover
    Circle Vision 360
    Alpine Gardens

    Existing Attractions
    Matterhorn Bobsleds
    Skyway to Fantasyland
    Tomorrowland Autopia
    Submarine Voyage Thru Liquid Space
    Monorail
    Tomorrowland Terrace Stage​
     
    The Jungle Book (Chuck Jones version)
  • The Jungle Book

    Released on August 11, 1967

    Distributor
    Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer

    Produced by
    MGM Animation/Visual Arts

    Supervising Director
    Chuck Jones

    Sequence Directors
    Ben Washam
    Abe Levitow

    Executive Producers
    Les Goldman
    Earl Jonas

    Supervising Animators
    Lloyd Vaughn
    Ken Harris
    Richard Thompson
    Tom Ray
    Phil Roman
    Don Towsley
    Phil Monroe
    Zack Dillinger*
    Leslie Alston*

    *Fictional animator

    Music
    Eugene Poddany

    Voices

    Rikki-Tikki-Tavi segment
    Shepard Menken as Rikki-Tikki-Tavi
    Orson Welles as Nag
    June Foray as Nagaina
    Matthew Garber as Teddy
    Mel Blanc as Chuchundra
    Lennie Weinrib as Darzee


    Mowgli's Brothers segment
    Kurt Russell as Mowgli
    James Earl Jones as Baloo the Bear
    Sebastian Cabot as Bagheera the Panther
    John Vernon as Shere Khan
    Mel Blanc as Tabaqui the Jackal
    June Foray as Mother Wolf
    Ben Wright as Father Wolf
    John Abbott as Akela


    White Seal segment
    Roddy McDowall as Kotick
    June Foray as Mackah
    Thurl Ravenscroft as the Blue Whale
    Candy Candido as the Sea Vitch
    Hans Conried as the Sea Catch
    Verna Felton (last film role) as the Sea Cow​
     
    Chanticleer (1967 Film)
  • Chanticleer

    Released by Walt Disney on October 18, 1967

    Directed by
    Wolfgang Reitherman

    Story
    Larry Clemmons
    Ralph Wright
    Ken Anderson
    Vance Gerry

    Animators
    Milt Kahl
    Frank Thomas
    Ollie Johnston
    John Lounsbery
    Ted Berman
    Julius Svendsen
    Bill Justice
    Hal King
    Eric Cleworth
    Eric Larson
    Fred Hellmich
    Walt Stanchfield
    John Ewing
    Dick Lucas
    Dan MacManus
    David Tendlar (Formerly of Famous Studios)
    Whitey Larkin*
    Helen O'Grady*

    *Fictional animators

    Voices
    Roger Miller as Chanticleer
    Phil Harris as Patou
    Julie Andrews as Goldie Pheasant
    Cesar Romero as Poco Loco
    J. Pat O'Malley as Reynard the Fox​
     
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