TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

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A P-27K Sky Shark of the 179th Fighter Group on the Kentucky-Tennessee Front, circa May of 1943. With the reports of a new Confederate fighter coming in early of 1943, engineers at Curtiss would respond by equipping the P-27J with a new powerplant, the Allison V-1744, which was a licensed copy of the German DB-605 Engine, in which it would grant the new K models of the Sky Shark more horsepower. Within a short period of time, the new variant would begin to operational service with the USAF on the Kentucky-Tennessee where they were able to match the new Merlin powered Hound-Dogs, thus making a good stop-gap until the P-46 began to enter service later on in the Autumn of 1943.
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A North American A-36 Apache from the 604th Attack Squadron on the Tennessee Front during the Battle of Chattanooga, circa Autumn of 1943. In the middle of 1940, the North American Company would begin a new development of a new interceptor design which would be dubbed as the XP-47 Mustang. In the Autumn of 1941, the USAF would make a formal request to North American Aviation for a new so-called attack aircraft using the XP-47 as a base. By September of 1942, the variant, dubbed the A-36 Apache would begin to enter service with the USAF, in which it would prove to be an excellent plane in it's role as an attack aircraft as well as doubling as a fighter. Throughout 1943 and into 1944, the Apache filled the role as the USAF's primary ground attack aircraft, supporting the advancing US Army forces as they advanced into the Confederacy. The plane was armed with 12.7mm MGs in the nose and four in the wings, it can also carry up to 1,000 lbs of bombs on each wing and the later variants can also carry 5 HVAR rockets on each wing, thus making it a bane to any Confederate ground troops. A total of 866 Apaches would be built from late 1942 up until July of 1944, in which it soldier on in US service up until 1947 for frontline units.
 
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A North American A-36 Apache from the 604th Attack Squadron on the Tennessee Front during the Battle of Chattanooga, circa Autumn of 1943. In the middle of 1940, the North American Company would begin a new development of a new interceptor design which would be dubbed as the XP-47 Mustang. In the Autumn of 1941, the USAF would make a formal request to North American Aviation for a new so-called attack aircraft using the XP-47 as a base. By September of 1942, the variant, dubbed the A-36 Apache would begin to enter service with the USAF, in which it would prove to be an excellent plane in it's role as an attack aircraft as well as doubling as a fighter.
So close, and yet so far.... sigh...
 
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Here's my second take on the Curtiss P-46 Supershark, which this one is from the 14th Fighter Wing during the Battle of Atlanta during the Winter of 1943-1944.
 
Some Second Great War era Gas Masks for the US Armed Forces
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M1936 Protective Respirator - Standard Issue Gas Mask for the US Army during the SGW
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M1943 Lightweight Gas Mask
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Mark IV Gas Mask - Standard issue to US Navy and Marine Corps.
 
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Lexington.png

Lexington class Battlecruiser (1921)

Specifications (following 1934 refit)
Weight: 44,690 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: Turbo Electric Transmission
Range: 10,000 nautical miles
Speed: 33.25 knots
Aviation Capacity: 3 Curtiss SOC Seagull seaplanes, 2 catapults
Armor:
  • Belt: 178mm
  • Main Deck: 57mm
  • Turrets: 279mm
  • Conning Tower: 305mm
Armament:
  • 8 x 16 in guns (4 x 2)
  • 14 x 6 in guns
  • 8 x 5 inch/25-caliber AA guns
  • 4 x 1.1/75-caliber AA guns
  • 8 x 12.7mm AA machine-guns
  • 8 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 x 2)
Ship​
Builder​
Laid Down​
Launched​
Commissioned​
Decommissioned​
Fate​
USS Remembrance (BC-1)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsAugust 17th, 1915April 1st, 1918May 10th, 1920Converted to aircraft carrier, 1916-1920
Sunk during the Battle of Midway, December 7th, 1941
USS Lexington (BC-2)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsJanuary 8th, 1916November 14th, 1919January 4th, 1922January 6th, 1949Struck March 1st, 1954; Sold for scrap, July 8th, 1954.
USS Sandwich Islands (BC-3)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsSeptember 25th, 1915Cancelled August 1918. Broken up on slipway 1918.
USS Yorktown (BC-4)New York Shipbuilding, Camden, New JerseyJuly 5th, 1916Cancelled August 1918. Broken up on slipway 1918.
USS Saratoga (BC-5)Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaSeptember 23rd, 1915July 30th, 1919December 9th, 1921Sunk by CSS Jefferson Davis, February 5th, 1942.
USS United States (BC-6)Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaSeptember 25th, 1915Cancelled August 1918. Broken up on slipway 1918.

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USS Lexington as of July of 1944

Specifications (1944)
Weight: 44,690 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: Turbo Electric Transmission
Range: 10,000 nautical miles
Speed: 33.25 knots
Aviation Capacity: 2 Vought OS2U Kingfisher, 1 catapult
Armor:
  • Belt: 178mm
  • Main Deck: 57mm
  • Turrets: 279mm
  • Conning Tower: 305mm
Armament:
  • 8 x 16 in guns (4 x 2)
  • 20 x 5 inch/38-caliber guns (10x2)
  • 16 x Quad 40mm AA guns
  • 45 x 20mm AA machine-guns
 
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Here's a batch of some US Navy Light Cruisers

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Phoenix class Light Cruiser (1914)

Specifications (As originally built)
Weight: 6,390 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 4x Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines
Range: 9,000 nautical miles
Speed: 35 knots
Armor:
  • Belt: 70mm
  • Main Deck: 33mm
  • Conning Tower: 20mm
Armament:
  • 4 x 6 in guns in turrets
  • 8 x 6 in guns in casemate
  • 6 x 76mm rapid fire guns
  • 4 x 47mm salute guns
  • 6 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 x 3)
  • 210 x naval mines
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
USS Phoenix (CL-1)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaMarch 28, 1910April 9, 1912September 2, 1914May, 1930Sold for Scrap, June 6, 1930.
USS Manchester (CL-2)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaApril 1, 1910April 14, 1912August 29, 1914May 1930Sold for Scrap, June 8, 1930.
USS Fargo (CL-3)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsJune 12, 1910June 30, 1912December 2, 1914December 1935Sold for Scrap, January 8, 1937
USS Altoona (CL-4)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaApril 10, 1910April 29, 1912September 21, 1914September 1, 1944Sold for Scrap, February 11, 1945
USS Scranton (CL-5)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsJune 14, 1910July 2, 1912December 28, 1914Sunk by the HMS Edinburgh in the Atlantic, June 11, 1915
USS Eugene (CL-6)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsJune 9, 1910June 29, 1912January 10, 1915Sunk by Confederate Bombers at Nassau, August 15, 1941.
USS Bangor (CL-7)Union Iron Works, San FranciscoAugust 7, 1910August 30, 1912January 21, 1915December 1935Sold for Scrap, February 6, 1937
USS Peoria (CL-8)Neafie & Leavy, PhiladelphiaOctober 6, 1910September 30, 1912April 9, 1915September 13, 1944Sold for Scrap, January 21, 1946
USS Madison (CL-9)Union Iron Works, San FranciscoAugust 16, 1910August 22, 1912January 9, 1915Sunk during the Battle of the Three Navies, June 11th, 1916
USS Baltimore (CL-10)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaApril 11, 1910May 15, 1912September 25, 1914December 1935Sold for Scrap, January 9, 1937

757928USS_Omaha_1944.jpg

Omaha class Light Cruiser (1918)

Specifications (As originally built)
Weight: 7,050 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 4x Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines
Range: 9,000 nautical miles
Speed: 35 knots
Armor:
  • Belt: 76mm
  • Main Deck: 38mm
  • Turrets: 20mm
  • Conning Tower: 20mm
Armament:
  • 4 x 6 in guns in turrets (2 x 2)
  • 8 x 6 in guns in casemate
  • 2 x 76mm AA guns
  • 6 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 x 3)
  • 224 x naval mines
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
USS Omaha (CL-11)Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co, Tacoma, WashingtonDecember 6, 1915December 14, 1917February 24, 1918September 1, 1944Sold for Scrap, January 18, 1945
USS Milwaukee (CL-12)Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co, Tacoma, WashingtonDecember 13, 1915December 26, 1917June 20, 1918September 19, 1944Sold for Scrap, January 10, 1945
USS Cincinnati (CL-13)
ex - Indianapolis
Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsAugust 16, 1916August 19, 1918September 4, 1920September 1, 1944Sold for Scrap, December 9, 1944
USS Utica (CL-14)Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, MassachusettsNovember 1, 1916October 30, 1919June 9, 1921September 20, 1944Sold for Scrap, February 2, 1945
USS Tacoma (CL-15)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaDecember 15, 1916April 30, 1918September 3, 1920November 5, 1944Sold for Scrap, December 6, 1945
USS Marblehead (CL-16)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaDecember 16, 1916April 9, 1918September 14, 1920January 2, 1945Sold for Scrap, February 6, 1946.
USS Columbus (CL-17)William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaFebruary 9, 1917February 16, 1919August 6, 1921September 22, 1944Sold for Scrap, January 20, 1945
USS Saginaw (CL-18)Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co, Tacoma, WashingtonJanuary 23, 1916January 29, 1918November 16, 1918Sunk by Confederate Destroyers near Nassau, August 17, 1941.
CL-19William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaCancelled, April 1918
CL-20William Cramp & Sons, PhiladelphiaCancelled, April 1918

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Dover class Light Cruiser (1927)

Specifications (As originally built)
Weight: 8,590 long tons fully loaded
Propulsion: 4x Westinghouse reduction geared steam turbines
Range: 9,700 nautical miles
Speed: 35 knots
Aviation Capacity: 1 Curtiss O2C, 1 catapult
Armor:
  • Belt: 80mm
  • Main Deck: 40mm
  • Turrets: 24mm
  • Conning Tower: 20mm
Armament:
  • 8 x 6 in guns in turrets (4 x 2)
  • 6 x 76mm AA guns
  • 8 x 12.7mm AA machine-guns
  • 6 x 533mm torpedo tubes (2 x 3)
ShipBuilderLaid DownLaunchedCommissionedDecommissionedFate
USS Dover (CL-19)Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City.April 1, 1924April 14, 1925July 24, 1927July 9, 1946Sold for Scrap, January 10, 1950
USS Harrisburg (CL-20)Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, PennsylvaniaJune 6, 1924June 17, 1925November 1, 1927Sunk by CSS Texas in the Atlantic, November 5, 1941.
USS Fort Wayne (CL-21)Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co, Tacoma, WashingtonAugust 23, 1924September 4, 1925February 22, 1928Sunk by Japanese Warships during the Battle of Midway, December 8, 1941.
USS Missoula (CL-22)Todd Dry Dock & Construction Co, Tacoma, WashingtonAugust 29, 1924September 1, 1925February 10, 1928October 19, 1945Sunk during weapons tests near the Sandwich Islands, July 16, 1948.
USS Scranton (CL-23)Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City.May 3, 1924May 20, 1925August 4, 1927Sunk during Second Battle of Bermuda, April 11, 1943.
 
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guys question would the union have wartime light carriers or would they simply make escort carriers like in the books .
 
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An analog to OTL's Independence-class CVLs is not out of the question. Whether merchant hulls (Bogue and Casablanca-class OTL) or tanker hulls (Sangamon and Commencement Bay-class OTL) is an open issue for CVEs.

Heavy carriers would probably be OTL's Essex class ships.
 
S. Marlowski, in your headcannon why is the union cruiser hull numbers seperatd by ship type instead of one list of hull numbersfor all cruisers. also roughly how many predreadnoughts and dreadnoughts would the union have during the first great war.
 
S. Marlowski, in your headcannon why is the union cruiser hull numbers seperatd by ship type instead of one list of hull numbersfor all cruisers. also roughly how many predreadnoughts and dreadnoughts would the union have during the first great war.
The reason for this is because the US Navy wanted to differentiate between the various cruiser types in service (Light cruisers, heavy cruisers, armored cruisers, etc.)
 
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