Photos of the Kaiserreich

The current uniform for football players in the Empire of Brazil:
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Commander of the Proletariat and Chairman of the Union of America William Z. Foster

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Industrial workers skirmish with police in Detroit, 1937

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Members of the (unofficial) Negro Farmers and Tenant Union gather in Chicago on the outbreak of the Second Civil War

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An American soldier watches Detroit burn as Syndicalist militia battle for control of the city

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A factory in Michigan builds tanks for the Syndicalist Union Army

according-to-party-leaders-william-z-foster-of-new-york-general-of-picture-id515450470

Foster meets with a representative of the Black Southern Unions to encourage them to revolt
[...] As the Syndicalist forces coalesced across the Steel Belt and took control of major power centers from Northern Minnesota to NYC the outbreak of War seemed inevitable. Big Bill Haywood spoke daily about the coming "Congress of the People" who would form a new government truly by and for the people as demands from Washington to disperse were ignored. As the Syndicalist government took shape the various factions took shape as well. During the coming War however there were two major factions, the Syndicalists and the Social Patriots. The Syndicalists were just that, Syndicalists who sought to radically reform the United States in one form or another from the orthodox Syndicalists like Jack Reed, who was Haywood's expected successor to the Centralists like William Foster. Then there were the 'Social Patriots' who saw the merits of some Syndicalist programs but thought to radical a change would just inspire the bourgeoise to strike back and destroy everything. These were led by James Burnham, a Technocrat and Managerialist and Earl Browder who was a radical Totalist who sought to personally lead the Revolution. As the First Syndicate Congress met in Chicago the Social Patriots tried to seize control of the movement. They introduced multiple legislations they believed they could get passed to give them more power like redefining the vote and how much property would be seized. However, in retrospect predictably, they were checked and the Syndicalists in the IWW maintained control. With their power secure and the deadline to surrender looming Big Bill Haywood appeared before the Congress and declared the Second American Revolution to be in progress. Three days later the first skirmishes between Syndicalist militia and Federal troops broke out in Maryland.

[...] With the surrender of the last Pacific forces, the War was over. It had taken two long and brutal years but the Combined Syndicates of America had taken control of (most) of America. While New England and Hawaii remained under foreign influence and some within the Syndicate High Command wanted to strike them now before the massess of hardened troops they had went home, Haywood turned them down. "The nation is tired" he said "let it rest. There will be time enough soon". Now with the war over the members of the IWW Congress met once more in Chicago to decide who would lead the nation. At first Haywood was suggested and it seemed an easy decision, but then word reached the Congress that Haywood had a sudden stroke on his way to the Congress and died. They convened the Congress for the day in mourning but when they returned the next day the various factions within the Syndicalist movement began to jostle for power. The Social Patriots who were shut out of power early in the War were further marginalized as their power base, the white Southern Unions, were expelled from the Congress for their neutrality in the War. However, upon Foster's insistence and the fact of the Black Belt revolt being both credited largely to him and being crucial for the defeat of the Old Democrats, the Black unions were welcomed in their place. These unions, loyal to Foster and Foster alone for being their loudest voice among the Congress and for his help during their revolt, were key during the next round of votes. During these votes Foster and the TUUL (Trade Union Unity League) gained more and more of an edge as the black unions won them more and more votes. Finally, after nearly a month and a half of debate the Congress came to a close and Foster was elected the head of the Combined Syndicates.

Foster almost immediately got to work shaping America in his own image. His first move was against anybody with ties to Earl Browder and James Burnham. Both of them continued to resist him even after his ascension to power and their unions resisted orders to stop distributing anti-Foster propaganda. Using this as a pretext saying it destabilized the Union Foster purged the Syndicalist Congress of any delegates linked to them and more than a few who just were enemies of him. Many were arrested and more than a few vanished into thin air after being abducted by "thugs" but those who remained got the message. Before long a supermajority of the Congress held TUUL membership cards and supported Foster. Burnham himself fled to Mexico and was never seen again while Browder fled to the Commune where he died a few years later of stomach cancer. Many conspiracy theorists claim Foster had him killed though there is scant evidence to back it up. With his main political rivals gone Foster then targeted the next major roadblock to his perfect America, the remaining Bourgeoise. While very few in number a small amount of upper middle class and rich families remained in the Union. Most of them were owners of local factories who treated their workers well enough that when government officials came to nationalize their property they were convinced not to by local unions. This however would not do for Foster. All those capitalists who remained would inevitably turn back to their devious ways and must be silenced lest they become a hotbed of resistance later in history. This led to the Great Offensive against Capitalism, the first of many. TUUL union bosses worked up their members into a anti-capitalist fury and set them loose against the remnants of old America. Privately owned factories were burned, remaining mansions were stormed and looted and what families couldn't escape were beaten severely or even lynched. In two weeks 132 were injured and 27 killed but it had the desirable effect. The government swooped in and nationalized the remaining factories and seized what material wealth was left behind by their flight. With his external enemies destroyed Foster turned against the system itself. He began to decry the system of local unions that were scattered across the CSA and brute forced the American Reformation Bill through Congress which abolished the system of semi-autonomous unions in favor of One Big Union, the American Union based in Chicago. This was met with fierce resistance by the Syndicalists who remained the only major faction still able to challenge Foster. Under Jack Reed they ordered their own union, the IWW, to resist centralization efforts by Foster. This played right into his hands however. Foster severely denounced Reed in the next Congress and labelled the IWW as anti-Union reactionaries. He ordered his Revolutionary Guards, a group of fanatically Fosterite militia typically made up of young men, to travel with the Centralization Administration to ensure the local unions were absorbed. When IWW militia showed up to resist them fights typically broke out and more often than not the IWW was forced into retreat. By late 1939 the Campaign to Solidify the Union was almost complete and the Syndicalists were quickly losing their bargaining power as the IWW began losing members. Reed, in a last attempt to oppose Foster, called for a vote of no confidence against him, but found nobody willing to back him up leading to the vote never coming to the floor. When Foster heard about this he had Reed arrested for plotting against the people and the Congress and he would die of pneumonia in prison seven months later.

By January of 1940 Foster was the undisputed leader of the American Revolution, which had by now expanded by force of arms to New England, Canada and Mexico, and he saw to it that the Revolution was ongoing. Fosters next declaration, The Directive on the Organization of the National Economy, led to the institution of a totally planned economy. Everything from the smallest turnip to the largest bomber was made according government plans and under the excruciatingly close eye of the government. While this bred inefficiency where the government focused, as soon as its back was turned under the table deals kept the wheels of industry moving as smoothly as possible. With American troops advancing through Central and into northern South America that industry was all the more vital. It was also about this time the Army was reorganized and expanded and rebuilt around large and mobile divisions outfitted with trucks to move fast and tanks to hit hard. These new units tore through the less well armed and smaller South American enemies they fought against with the only real check to their advance being Mother Nature, but even she would be overcome with persistence. By the time the last Argentinian forces surrendered in late 1940 the Second Weltkrieg was already in full swing and Foster, at the head of his True Revolutionary Faction, sought to strike Europe and fight not only the forces of Reaction in Germany and Russia but the "false Revolutionaries" in the Union of Britain and Commune of France. The coming Great Crusade would be the longest and bloodiest war in American history but as American troops thundered over the waves in early 1941 they were sure in their victory.

(Pt 2 coming soon)
 
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Commander of the Proletariat and Chairman of the Union of America William Z. Foster

Stonewall+Riots,+June+28,+1969+(8).jpg

Industrial workers skirmish with police in Detroit, 1937

labor_m2panel1_civilrights_rrfiremen.jpg

Members of the (unofficial) Negro Farmers and Tenant Union gather in Chicago on the outbreak of the Second Civil War

636361954016546773-sniper-Tony-Spina-019.jpg

An American soldier watches Detroit burn as Syndicalist militia battle for control of the city

191105-A-ZZ999-001C.JPG

A factory in Michigan builds tanks for the Syndicalist Union Army

according-to-party-leaders-william-z-foster-of-new-york-general-of-picture-id515450470

Foster meets with a representative of the Black Southern Unions to encourage them to revolt
[...] As the Syndicalist forces coalesced across the Steel Belt and took control of major power centers from Northern Minnesota to NYC the outbreak of War seemed inevitable. Big Bill Haywood spoke daily about the coming "Congress of the People" who would form a new government truly by and for the people as demands from Washington to disperse were ignored. As the Syndicalist government took shape the various factions took shape as well. During the coming War however there were two major factions, the Syndicalists and the Social Patriots. The Syndicalists were just that, Syndicalists who sought to radically reform the United States in one form or another from the orthodox Syndicalists like Jack Reed, who was Haywood's expected successor to the Centralists like William Foster. Then there were the 'Social Patriots' who saw the merits of some Syndicalist programs but thought to radical a change would just inspire the bourgeoise to strike back and destroy everything. These were led by James Burnham, a Technocrat and Managerialist and Earl Browder who was a radical Totalist who sought to personally lead the Revolution. As the First Syndicate Congress met in Chicago the Social Patriots tried to seize control of the movement. They introduced multiple legislations they believed they could get passed to give them more power like redefining the vote and how much property would be seized. However, in retrospect predictably, they were checked and the Syndicalists in the IWW maintained control. With their power secure and the deadline to surrender looming Big Bill Haywood appeared before the Congress and declared the Second American Revolution to be in progress. Three days later the first skirmishes between Syndicalist militia and Federal troops broke out in Maryland.

[...] With the surrender of the last Pacific forces, the War was over. It had taken two long and brutal years but the Combined Syndicates of America had taken control of (most) of America. While New England and Hawaii remained under foreign influence and some within the Syndicate High Command wanted to strike them now before the massess of hardened troops they had went home, Haywood turned them down. "The nation is tired" he said "let it rest. There will be time enough soon". Now with the war over the members of the IWW Congress met once more in Chicago to decide who would lead the nation. At first Haywood was suggested and it seemed an easy decision, but then word reached the Congress that Haywood had a sudden stroke on his way to the Congress and died. They convened the Congress for the day in mourning but when they returned the next day the various factions within the Syndicalist movement began to jostle for power. The Social Patriots who were shut out of power early in the War were further marginalized as their power base, the white Southern Unions, were expelled from the Congress for their neutrality in the War. However, upon Foster's insistence and the fact of the Black Belt revolt being both credited largely to him and being crucial for the defeat of the Old Democrats, the Black unions were welcomed in their place. These unions, loyal to Foster and Foster alone for being their loudest voice among the Congress and for his help during their revolt, were key during the next round of votes. During these votes Foster and the TUUL (Trade Union Unity League) gained more and more of an edge as the black unions won them more and more votes. Finally, after nearly a month and a half of debate the Congress came to a close and Foster was elected the head of the Combined Syndicates.

Foster almost immediately got to work shaping America in his own image. His first move was against anybody with ties to Earl Browder and James Burnham. Both of them continued to resist him even after his ascension to power and their unions resisted orders to stop distributing anti-Foster propaganda. Using this as a pretext saying it destabilized the Union Foster purged the Syndicalist Congress of any delegates linked to them and more than a few who just were enemies of him. Many were arrested and more than a few vanished into thin air after being abducted by "thugs" but those who remained got the message. Before long a supermajority of the Congress held TUUL membership cards and supported Foster. Burnham himself fled to Mexico and was never seen again while Browder fled to the Commune where he died a few years later of stomach cancer. Many conspiracy theorists claim Foster had him killed though there is scant evidence to back it up. With his main political rivals gone Foster then targeted the next major roadblock to his perfect America, the remaining Bourgeoise. While very few in number a small amount of upper middle class and rich families remained in the Union. Most of them were owners of local factories who treated their workers well enough that when government officials came to nationalize their property they were convinced not to by local unions. This however would not do for Foster. All those capitalists who remained would inevitably turn back to their devious ways and must be silenced lest they become a hotbed of resistance later in history. This led to the Great Offensive against Capitalism, the first of many. TUUL union bosses worked up their members into a anti-capitalist fury and set them loose against the remnants of old America. Privately owned factories were burned, remaining mansions were stormed and looted and what families couldn't escape were beaten severely or even lynched. In two weeks 132 were injured and 27 killed but it had the desirable effect. The government swooped in and nationalized the remaining factories and seized what material wealth was left behind by their flight. With his external enemies destroyed Foster turned against the system itself. He began to decry the system of local unions that were scattered across the CSA and brute forced the American Reformation Bill through Congress which abolished the system of semi-autonomous unions in favor of One Big Union, the American Union based in Chicago. This was met with fierce resistance by the Syndicalists who remained the only major faction still able to challenge Foster. Under Jack Reed they ordered their own union, the IWW, to resist centralization efforts by Foster. This played right into his hands however. Foster severely denounced Reed in the next Congress and labelled the IWW as anti-Union reactionaries. He ordered his Revolutionary Guards, a group of fanatically Fosterite militia typically made up of young men, to travel with the Centralization Administration to ensure the local unions were absorbed. When IWW militia showed up to resist them fights typically broke out and more often than not the IWW was forced into retreat. By late 1939 the Campaign to Solidify the Union was almost complete and the Syndicalists were quickly losing their bargaining power as the IWW began losing members. Reed, in a last attempt to oppose Foster, called for a vote of no confidence against him, but found nobody willing to back him up leading to the vote never coming to the floor. When Foster heard about this he had Reed arrested for plotting against the people and the Congress and he would die of pneumonia in prison seven months later.

By January of 1940 Foster was the undisputed leader of the American Revolution, which had by now expanded by force of arms to New England, Canada and Mexico, and he saw to it that the Revolution was ongoing. Fosters next declaration, The Directive on the Organization of the National Economy, led to the institution of a totally planned economy. Everything from the smallest turnip to the largest bomber was made according government plans and under the excruciatingly close eye of the government. While this bred inefficiency where the government focused, as soon as its back was turned under the table deals kept the wheels of industry moving as smoothly as possible. With American troops advancing through Central and into northern South America that industry was all the more vital. It was also about this time the Army was reorganized and expanded and rebuilt around large and mobile divisions outfitted with trucks to move fast and tanks to hit hard. These new units tore through the less well armed and smaller South American enemies they fought against with the only real check to their advance being Mother Nature, but even she would be overcome with persistence. By the time the last Argentinian forces surrendered in late 1940 the Second Weltkrieg was already in full swing and Foster, at the head of his True Revolutionary Faction, sought to strike Europe and fight not only the forces of Reaction in Germany and Russia but the "false Revolutionaries" in the Union of Britain and Commune of France. The coming Great Crusade would be the longest and bloodiest war in American history but as American troops thundered over the waves in early 1941 they were sure in their victory.

(Pt 2 coming soon)
Isn't that a picture of Earl Browder at the top?
 
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A platoon of soldiers from the 67th “Soissons” Regiment of the 38ème Division of the French Communard First Army pose for a picture in the streets of Luxembourg City, July 14, 1939. The Soissons Regiment(so named because it was recruited from the men of the city of Soissons) would see heavy fighting throughout the war as part of the 38ème Division, particualrly in the Drive Through Wallonia and the Battle of Cologne. The initial French advance through the border areas of Alsace Lorraine, Wallonia and Flanders had gone surprisingly well; the Germans had counted on the Ludendorff Line to hold the, well, line, but French sappers and the special heavy tank units of the Commune Guard had successfully penetrated the initial German defenses, and within two months of the outbreak of war they were in both Metz and Mulhouse. The incredibly brutal urban fighting in Saarbrucken slowly the Communard advance, but couldn’t stop it, and the Germans were forced to pin their hopes on anchoring their defenses at the Rhine. The 38éme Division, and the men of the the Soissons Regiment, would play a crucial role in the upcoming Operation Xavier....

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A model kit example of a Communard H.258 naval bomber. Introduced in 1934, it would prone to be a highly effective submarine hunter, with German U-Boat crews referred to the Bay of Biscay, which was heavily patrolled by the H.258s, as “The Valley of the Shadow of Death”. Carrying a four man crew and equipped with four machine guns as well as four torpedoes, the H.258 would remain in active service until 1942, when it was phased out in favor of the PL.108. Other models would be sold to Romania( Romania, despite being a far right regime under the Iron Guard, saw their joint hatred for Germany as more important and supplied the French with oil in exchange for military equipment like aircraft) the Socialist Republic of Italy, the CNT-FAI and Egypt.

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A paratrooper of the Nationalist Italian Milanese government armed with a MAB-38 submachine takes a break in a courtyard during street to street fighting in the city of Ferrara. The ANI rose to power following elections in September 1936 and immediately began preparing the Milanese government for a war of revenge against the syndicalist Turin government and the increasingly autocratic Austrians. ANI operatives made contact with ethnic Italians in Slovenia, the Austrian Littorial and Tyrol, helping spark insurgencies against Vienna. Milan bided it’s time as the syndicalist took over the rest of Italy, heavily fortifying the Po River and strengthening its armed forces. With the tide of war fully turning against the Third Internationale, the Nationalists threw their paratroopers and marines across the Po in the summer of 1944, followed by elite units such as the Ariete armored division. Nationalist Italy’s timely entry into the war saw them rewarded with Emilia-Romagna and Tuscany, as well as northern parts of the Umbria and Marche regions, while the Sardinian based Kingdom of Italy was restored in Piedmont and the Reichspakt aligned Italian Confederation was created in southern Italy with its capitol in Rome.
 
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Poster of "Quo Vado?" (here it is shown the english version of the poster), a french-italian satirical movie directed and acted by italian actor Checco Zalone.
The plot is centered around Alessandro Ferretti, a sicilian song-writer, who is forced to travel to Nice, searching for better opportunities after the Christian Culture Instutite disapproved most of his songs.
The movie is divided mostly in two arcs: on one side it analyses Alessandro's difficoulties to adapt to a more liberal society , on the other it explores Alessandro questioning his sexuality when he discovers to be attracted to both Brigitte, a french singer, and Dario, his roommate.
The movie has been praised as satirical masterpiece both towards the Italian Federation's society and values and the "no bisexuals" trope comon in many French and German movies.
The ending in particular is considered one of the best part of the film thanks to its mix of satire, drama and social commentary: Alessandro proposes to both Brigitte and Dario, saying that "this is basically how marriage works in the italian federation : the classic family is formed by husband, wife, their Children, his secretary, her tennis istructor and the dog. We are basically simplifing the process" but the last shot of the movie is Alessandro looking sadly at the horizont, knowing that he will never be able to go back home without facing consequences.
While the movie recived international praise, it was harshly criticised by the Christian Culture Instute and banned in the Italian Federation
What's the political landscape of this KRTL?
 
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Supporters of the Volksbund wave their movement’s red-black-gold flags in celebration upon hearing the news that Kaiser Georg II had abdicated and that the “Emergency Council” which had ruled their nation for over a decade was dissolving to allow for free and fair elections once more, 2012. The ascension of Kaiser Georg II in 1997 had caused serious concerns in some elements of German society; the new Kaiser was seen as being autocratic on a level not seen since Wilhelm II’s day, and increasing polarization and deadlock in Germany’s political scene were posing an increasing threat to the country itself. In September of 2000 a series of deadly bombings were orchestrated by the neo-syndicalist terrorist group known as the Free German Republican Army in the cities of Cologne, Hanover, Stuttgart, Frankfurt and Hamburg; when the smoke cleared over a hundred people had been killed and several hundred more wounded, and the situation only seemed to be escalating. When the Kaiser‘s brother, Prince Otto, was nearly assassinated by a sniper at a public speaking event in Berlin Georg II made his move. While Germany was a constitutional monarchy, it’s monarch had greater powers than those of nations like the Canadian Commonwealth, and with the country deadlocked following two rounds of indecisive elections Georg II utilized his powers to create an “non-partisan Emergency Council” to run the country until the “situation stabilized”. The Emergency Council, however, quickly began to implement autocratic policies with the full support of Georg II, to the point where by 2003 Germans were living in circumstances which would have been quite familiar to anyone who had experienced the Ludendorff dictatorship almost a century earlier. Using fears of further FGRA attacks(who continued conducting occasional bombings, although not nearly as successfully as they had in 2000) the Emergency Council‘s crackdown continued, and even increased in intensity. By 2008, however, the people of Germany were fed up with Emergency Council rule, and the Volksbund movement was formed. Calling for the restoration of democracy and the abdication of Kaiser Georg II, who had become symbolic of the Emergency Council’s worst abuses, and who continued to strongly support them, the movement began with a small protest in the city of Essen. Over the next several years it spread like wildfire through the cities of Germany, culminating in massive rallies in May of 2012. The police found themselves overwhelmed as the crowds continued to grow, and the military police, armed with tear gas and rubber bullets, were called in. In cities like Dresden and Rostock local government turned a blind eye as members of far right paramilitary groups such as the Iron Eagles clashed with protesters; in the city of Aachen a company of military police actually famously defected to the Volksbund and helped repulse the Iron Eagles in the “Battle of Katschhof Square”. With Germany seemingly teetering on the verge of outright insurrection or even civil war the members of the Emergency Council met with Kaiser Georg II in a secret meeting at a bunker beneath one of Georg‘s personal residences in East Prussia. The exact details of the meeting have remained classified to this day, but what is known is that the next day— May 26– Georg II announced he was abdicating the throne for the ”good of the German people”. That same day the Emergency Council formally announced that its members were resigning and that free elections were being scheduled in three months time. The people of Germany flowed into the streets once more, but this time in an eruption of joy.

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Soldiers of the Russian Federation on maneuvers in the province of Turgai. The Russian State, under the dictatorship of the NRPR, had held together for seventy five years total—far longer than anyone had anticipated after the death of the Vozhd—and had remained a major player in international affairs. By the mid 2000s, however, things had become clear that the regime had become stagnant and was failing to keep up with issues such as the country’s decaying infrastructure network and increasing overreliance on oil profits to help keep the large Russian military funded and functioning properly. In August of 2015, therefore, a joint coalition of civilian figures and dissident military officers who had lost faith in the NRPR, led by General Yevgeni Lebed, the nephew of the country‘s former leader Alexander Lebed(who had run the country from 1991 until his resignation due to “health issues“ in 2003) staged a coup, which would later become known as the “Silent Revolution“, deposing the NRPR “Old Guard” and creating the Transitional Government of National Unity. The government, with General Yevgeni Lebed as its figurehead in order to reassure the military and the hardliners within the NRPR, introduced a five year transitional plan in order to reintroduce democracy to Russia. Part of this process was a series of referendums held in Ukraine(divided between Eastern and Western Ukraine) Belarus, Georgia, and the Central Asian territories in 2017, offering a choice between full independence, partial independence and continued close association with the new Federation, or remaining a part of Russia. Belarus, Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan and Eastern Ukraine voted to remain a part of the Russian Federation; Western Ukraine, Georgia, and Turkmenistan voted for full independence; and Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan voted for partial independence and close association with the Russian Federation. Today, the Russian Federation is ranked as a flawed democracy; while there are several political parties capable of winning elections, the legacy of the NRPR dictatorship still looms large.

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George Corley Wallace, the third president of the American Union State, makes a speech in Montgomery, Alabama, 1968. Following the death of Huey Long in 1954 Sid McMath had succeeded him as president of the American Union State in the ensuing special election, but twelve years of overseeing the continued rebuilding of the country, diplomatic clashes with the Pacific States of America and the Entente backed New England government, and overseeing the war against the Silver Legion had left McMath exhausted. A former Colonel in the Union State’s Marine Corps, he had been wounded in the leg by a sniper during combat operations in southern Illinois in 1944, and he was increasingly eager to return home to Arkansas. As a result, he announced that he wouldn’t run in the upcoming 1966 special election, which led to a minor power struggle in whihc George Wallace ultimately emerged victorious. Wallace‘s assassination in 1975 has only added to the shroud of mystery surrounding the man; to this day, it is unclear which of his views of the issues of the day were genuinely his own and which were positions he had simply taken in order to advance to the position he held. Under Wallace the Union State slowly began to turn outwards out of the pseudo isolation it had been in since the end of the Civil War, forming an alliance with the South American nations of Argentina(which had split with Berlin at this point), Peru, Bolivia and Chile to counter German and Entente influence in the New World. Despite often surrounding himself with Confederate imagery Wallace quietly provided the FBI with increased resources to continue the war against the Second Silver Legion and other extremist groups across the Union State. On April 30th, 1975, Wallace was making a speech in Jefferson City, Missouri when a rifle shot rang out, striking him in the chest. Several more shots rang out in quick succession and Wallace toppled to the ground, mortally wounded— he would die of his wounds after slipping into a coma on May 2nd. The shooter, one David Richards, would led FBI and state authorities on a wild hunt across much of Missouri before he was finally run to ground and killed in a shootout on the outskirts of Joplin, Missouri. Although many possible motives have been advanced for Richards‘ actions, ranging from him being a German or Canadian agent to a conspiracy within the Union State government or simply being a homicidal individual out for his “fifteen minutes of fame”, his true motives likely will never be known.
 
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The Union of Britain aircraft carrier RNS Mosley cruises through the North Sea during the Republican Navy’s annual maneuvers, 2006. The Union of Britain’s Totalist regime remains, to this day, one of the world‘s few syndicalist states and by far the most powerful of the “rogue states”. The regime’s extreme paranoia and fear of invasion means that it is one of the most closed off and heavily fortified places on earth. Elaborate rings of coastal defenses and interlocking bunkers dot the coastlines of the Union of Britain, and a substantial amount of the nation’s GDP goes to maintaining its oversized navy, which includes three aircraft carriers— RNS Mosley, RNS Blair, and RNS Revolution. The Union of Britain alos possesses a number of nuclear weapons, and rumors continue to persist of biological weapons labs being hidden beneath Scottish mountains and experimental chemical weapons being tested on lonely Welsh moors. The belligerent posturing of the Union of Britain is a major reason why there are still large numbers of German troops stationed in Ireland, as the latest satellite reconnaissance passes have revealed what appear to be additional missile bases having been established on the Isle of Mann. The Union of Britain‘s special intelligence service, the Revolutionary Exportation Bureau, is one of the world‘s largest and most feared agencies. Founded in 1936 by Eric Blair, with orders to “set Europe Ablaze“, the organization‘s original leader, Kim Philby, established a sprawling headquarters hidden beneath a seemingly mundane government building in the city of Birmingham. It was from this headquarters that the R.E. D organized numerous operations against capitalist nations across the world, ranging from training CNT-FAI fighters in the Scottish Highlands to creating an entire replica German village in East Anglia, run by exiled German syndicalists, so that its agents could practice posing as native Germans. The Union of Britain‘s forces battled long and hard on the continent, but ultimately the Third Internationale was defeated in mainland Europe. Efforts to invade England proper were a different story, however; Chairman Mosley had been preparing for an invasion almost from the day he had taken office, and neither the Reichspakt nor the Entente was able to successfully gain a foothold. After over a year of stalemate, in which the Republican Navy was slowly worn down but had largely managed to hold its own, the Entente exhausted of both manpower and material following years of war and failed efforts to gain a firm beachhold, and the Reichspakt more interested in consolidating its gains and turning its attention east to deter the Russians from once more rumbling over the border, a second “Peace With Honor” was signed and the Union of Britain withdrew back behind the walls of “The People’s Fortress”.

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A group of National Revolutionary Army guerrillas demonstrate the camouflage skills which made them such feared opponents during the collapse of the League of Eight Provinces, 1936. The Left Kuomintang, under Wang Jingwei, were a lightly armed guerrilla force in southern China which had never the less managed to seize control of Fujian and Jiangxi Provinces by the time the house of cards came tumbling down in early 1936. Following his uprising Wang Jingwei had sent frantic, near constant requests for small arms and artillery to the Union of Britain and Commune of France, which had largely obliged him—as a result it was hardly uncommon to see LKMT guerrillas hauling around quick firing 18 pounder artillery pieces or their French 75mm counterparts. The British Enfield No. 4 Mark I rifle, in particular, was prized amongst the Chinese guerrillas for its accuracy and reliability. Ultimately, however, the presence of fanatical and well trained Japanese(and much less fanatical and well trained Fengtian) ”volunteers” enabled the Anqing Clique to successfully defeat the Left Kuomintang, although a low level insurgency would continue in Fujian Province for many years to come.


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The Bourne Ultimatum is the first book in the Jason Bourne novel series by Pacifican writer Robert Ludlum. Written in 1990, it details the exploits of a Pacifican commando code named Jason Bourne(his real name is not known until the end of the second book) , who was assigned to a joint intelligence task force run by Canadian Deputy Director Andrew Grant. In the course of the novel series, Bourne discovers a extensive conspiracy through the Entente’s intelligence services which threatens democracy itself, and goes on the run while being hunted by members of the cabal he is trying to bring down, the duped non conspiracy members of the Entente agencies, and various police and security forces.

In The Bourne Ultimatum, Grant sends Bourne on a top secret mission to extract a high value Canadian agent, an computer specialist at a new Russian missile base in the Murmansk region, and get him over the border into Entente allied Norway. Bourne arrives at Joint Forces Base McCarter, where he connects with Zoe Jennings, a New Englander agent assigned to be his communications contact for the mission. Bourne successfully infiltrates over the border and eventually the base itself while posing as one of the laborers being used to expand the facility, making contact with the Canadian agent, Vladimir Markov; before they can leave the base, however, a group of Ukrainian ultranationalists lead by Ivan Kobevko seize control of much of the base, aided by traitorous guards. Kobevko and his men are members of an obscure splinter group which had broken away from the mainline anti Russian Ukrainian insurgent movement, the Free Ukrainian Army; the fact that they were able to conduct such an operation so far from their usual base of operations in western Ukraine is shocking.

The Ukrainians begin using welding torches to cut their way into the sealed missile control center; Kobevko’s plan, once he has full control of the missiles, is to deliver an ultimatum to Moscow ordering them to leave “Greater Ukraine” or see Murmansk, St. Petersburg, Arkhangelsk, Moscow, and several other cities destroyed by nuclear missiles. The base is isolated enough that conventional Russian troops will be unable to reach it before the ultimatum expires. To make matters worse, a blizzard outside has grounded incoming aircraft. Bourne uses his sat phone to contact McCarter Base to inform them of the ongoing takeover; Director Grant orders him to extract with Markov, as the Russians would see an Entente agent at the base as being connected to the attack. However, the ultranationalists, lead by Kobevko‘s second in command Skripchenko, begin executing “unnecessary“ personnel amongst the bases’ technicians and scientists, causing Markov to openly balk at leaving. As he protests, several of the base’s guards who had defected to the ultranationalists, conducting a sweep for escaped base personnel, stumble across Markov and Bourne; Bourne manages to kill two of them, but the third guard manages to escape and rely the news to the rest of his companions,

A cat and mouse hunt through the base ensues as Bourne and Markov try to stay one step ahead of the ultranationalist teams hunting them. Bourne whittles down the terrorist force bit by bit in a series of clashes, including killing Skripchenko in a brutal fight in the base’s motor pool. The Ukrainians finally manage to breach through to the central missile control room, and Kobevko begins preparations to launch the missiles, angered by having lost so many of his men. Bourne storms the missile control room, killing the last few Ukrainian ultranationalists and mortally wounding Kobevko when he tries to manually launch the missiles. As the Ukrainian leader lays dying, he declares, in near perfect English, that Agent Bourne couldn’t stop Project Icarus and that ”it’s only just begun”. Markov, using the base central computer system, deactivates the targeting system and disarms the missiles. Bourne takes an encrypted flash drive that Kobevko had plugged into the Russian system as he and Markov leave the base, just minutes ahead of arriving Russian special forces.

Back at McCarter, Bourne giving Jennings the flash drive and asks her to discreetly try and figure out what the Ukrainians were working on. During his debriefing with Director Grant Bourne mentions Kobevko’s final words, which the Canadian dismisses as being the “ramblings of a dying man” and orders Bourne to go prepare for his next mission. After Bourne departs, Director Grant picks up his phone and calls Wilcox, a former Royal Canadian Marine and assassin working for the Entente Joint Intelligence Task Force. Grant grimly states that ”there’s been a leak” and orders Wilcox and his team to “terminate Jason Bourne“.

The novel concludes with Bourne killing two assassins at his hotel in Ottawa; the men have identification cards stating them to be Royal Canadian Mounted Police. Now the subject of a massive manhunt and branded as a rogue agent, Bourne goes on the run, determined to clear his name and expose Project Icarus. This leads into the events of the second book, The Bourne Identity.
 
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Mexican “volunteers” aim a French made Hotchkiss machine gun from an apartment window in Panama City, 1955. Panama had seized the long desired Panama Canal following the outbreak of the Second American Civil War in 1937, much to the alarm of the Canadian government, which had coveted the canal itself, and especially considering the fact that only a year earlier Panama had fought a border war with newly Entente allied Costa Rica. Ottawa, therefore, sponsored a coup by the paramilitary Panamanian National Police; Manuel Pino, the organization‘s commander, promptly invited a Entente “advisory force” into the country in order to help “stabilize“ it. Royal Canadian Marines and troops from the Jamaica Regiment of the West Indies Federation promptly disembarked and took control of the Canal Zone, leaving it rather obvious who was behind what had just transpired. The CPN, the National Police’s figurehead civilian leadership, would run Panama more or less quietly for the next eighteen years under a series of “Maximum Leaders”(that was apparently Omar Torrijos’s title IRL, and it sounds rather fitting for leaders of a military junta tbh). In 1955, however, the domestic opposition to the CPN, which had steadily been growing since the end of the Second Weltkrieg, skyrocketed. Pro democracy activists formed an alliance with Panama‘s(heavily repressed) labor movement in what would become known as the People’s Popular Front, and in the summer of 1955 launched an uprising in Panama City itself in an effort to take control of the country from the CPN and “Maximum Leader” Arnulfo Arias Madrid. The rebellion was assisted by ”volunteers” from Mexico; the syndicalist government there had, while quite friendly to the Third Internationale and sending a full division of volunteers, known as the Division Rojo(Red Division) to fight in mainland Europe, never actually joined the Third Internationale and therefore was not invaded during the Second Weltkrieg. Mexico provided a safe haven for wanted syndicalists fleeing from the Pacific States of America and the American Union State, as well as European syndicalists uncomfortable with Mosley‘s autocratic regime. Mexico had turned its attention to keeping syndicalism in the New World alive, sponsoring insurgents across Central America(who had been successful in Guatemala and El Salvador), the Dominican Republic, and Venezuela. Helping the People’s Popular Front in Panama, therefore, was seen as a greatly worthwhile cause and way to hit back at the imperialists. The People’s Popular Front would control Panama City for three days before the National Police, with Canadian air support, succesfully retook it; guerrilla warfare would continue in the country side for the next nine years until the fall of the CPN and democraticization of Panama in 1964.


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Siamese/Thai soldiers board a river transport en route to the Mekong Front, 1941. The Kingdom of Siam, today known as Thailand, was one of the few Asian nations not to be conquered by European colonists, and had expanded its borders at British and French expense following the Weltkrieg and the revolutions sweeping Britain and France. The country struggled mightily with the aftershocks of Black Monday due to its heavy reliance on trade with Germany, and therefore was more than receptive when Japanese investors came knocking. Tokyo’s help enabled the kingdom to shake off the economic collapse it had found itself in, but it also left Siam vulnerable to Japanese economic control. As a result, Siam was an early member of Japan’s alliance(supposedly setting aside its age old rivalry with fellow Japanese client Burma in the process), and therefore found itself at war with its former benefactor. The initial advance into Malaya went well, with a joint Japanese- Thai force taking Kuala Lampur.....and then things bogged down. Heroic German resistance in the jungles of Malaya slowed the advance towards Malacca City to a crawl, and finally stopped it outright. Fighting along the Mekong and in the jungles of Laos were inflicting horrifically heavy losses on Siam’s army, and then entry of both Fengtian China and Russia into the war against Japan had made it clear the kingdom had backed the wrong horse. Throughout 1943 the Japanese were driven back, yard by bloody yard, and with the fall of Bangkok in February of 1944 Siam had finally had enough, and formally capitulated to the Reichspakt. Japanese troops stationed in Burma would set up a collaborator ”Restored Siamese Kingdom“ in the Lower Shan State and the Moulmein region, but as the Japanese war effort gave out under the strain of fighting three great powers so too did their puppet states. The treaty ending the Great Pacific War stripped Siam of much of the lands it had gained in the 1920s; Cambodia was ceded to German East Asia, as was the country’s economically valuable(large tungsten and rubber deposits) Malay territories. Tired of fighting, Siam— which formally changed its name to Thailand in the aftermath of the war— withdrew into isolationism, seeking to avoid becoming entangled in the Reichspakt-Entente confrontation.



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A column of A11 “Matilda” tanks rumble down a road in Australasia‘s Northern Territory during Exercise Coiled Serpent, the Australasian Army’s annual army-wide war games. The Matilda was one of the Entente’s more widely used armored vehicles; introduced in late 1936 as a replacement for the famouslu— and ironically— mechanically unreliable A4 “Reliant” light tanks, the Matilda was a major leap forward in Entente tank design. Equipped with a quick firing 2 pounder(40mm) cannon, as well as a machine gun, the Matilda was sufficiently well armed for its day. It’s real advantage, however, was the fact that it was extremely heavily armored, far more so than the German Ozelot, Russian BT-10, English Pilot Mark III or French Communard FCM-36, all of which had been introduced in their own respective militaries at around the same time as the Matilda was developed. While this extra armor meant that the Matilda was a rather slow vehicle, once it did get to the battlefield it was almost invulnerable to many of the anti tank weapons of the day. One example of this is the oft repeated story from the Indian Reunification Wars is of Taj’s Pride, a Matilda tank of the Dominion of India’s armored corps. During the Battle of Raipur, the tank’s commander, Sergeant Vihaan Mehta, had brought his tank up and down the line over a dozen times during the course of the day, helping repulse numerous attacks by Indian Red Army infantrymen. His tank, despite being hit numerous times by French supplied 25mm anti tank guns(inspection by mechanics after the battle would reveal thirty four distinct impact sites) was still fully operational after the fight. The Matilda would ultimately slowly begin to be phased out as Entente forces encountered heavier anti tank guns— not to mention the fact that it simply couldn’t quite keep up with the pace of modern offensives—but it remained in active service with some Entente militaries, soldier on alongside newer models, until the early 1950s. The Australasian Army in particular was found its Matildas, with the last of them not being fully phased out of service until 1954.

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Japanese-American volunteers stand at attention during a Hawaiian National Guard training exercise, 1939. Following the outbreak of the American Civil War, the Hawaiian Islands were left vulnerable; the people of Hawaii had no real interest in fighting a civil war in the far off mainland. A bloodless revolt occurred, declaring Hawaii’s independence and creating a constitutional monarchy under David Kalakaua, which had promptly joined the Entente alliance. While most of the Pacific Fleet departed for the mainland and threw its hat in with one warring faction or another, Admirals Benjamin McCandlish and Luke McNamee managed to convince a portion of the fleet to sit out the war in Hawaii, protecting the islands from the looming Japanese threat. Experimental aircraft carrier USS(now HNS) Massachusetts, together with battleships USS(HNS) New Mexico, USS(HNS) Arizona, and USS(HNS) New York, and heavy cruisers USS(HNS) Seattle and USS(HNS) San Diego, gave the kingdom a fairly sizable naval punch. The five thousand man Hawaiian National Guard, however, was deemed insufficient to the task of defending the islands from a Japanese invasion, and therefore a call went out for volunteers. Despite the skepticism of his former American advisors, King David Kalakaua authorized General Barney Hajiro, a promising young officer in the Hawaiian National Guard who’d been promoted due to Hawaii‘s dire shortage of qualified commanders, to begin recruiting Japanese American volunteers to serve in the newly renamed Hawaiian Territorial Guard. Hajiro‘s volunteers would be nicknamed the “Phantom Battalion” for their skill at infiltrating behind enemy lines during the Indian Wars of Reunification, becoming one of the most highly decorated units in any of the Entente armies.
 
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