Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

Congresswoman Flora Blackford (S-NY), 1942
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Where is the “Cold War” that the USA is engaged in during the postwar years? That term implies an ideological and global struggle akin to the OTL USA-USSR Cold War. While countries such as Japanese Empire and the Russian Empire are not friends of the USA in 1944, any international contest with those empires would be more like traditional great power rivalry than anything the like our world’s Cold War.

The USA and the German Empire would be rivals, but it wouldn’t be an unfriendly rivalry. By the end of the series, there are strong suggestions that the USA intends to work with the German Empire to stop the proliferation of nuclear weapons.

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I do think that the USA can succeed in integrating former Canada and the former CSA. By 1944, the CSA has been utterly defeated and destroyed, and the Canadian and Mormon rebels have been defeated militarily. More importantly, the USA has the military power, economic power, and motivation to see through the integration of former Canada and the former CSA: it fits thematically in a series where the USA is seen struggling both to end hostile foreign encirclement in North America and to erase the shame of defeat in the War of Secession.

Again, the USA is not the OTL USSR. The USA is not a repressive dictatorship with an inefficient economy and engaged in an unsustainable global military and ideological struggle.

If a case is to be made for any of the TL-191 post-SGW empires politically fragmenting due to imperial overstretch or military conflict, the Japanese Empire and the Russian Empire might be better candidates for a development analogous to the OTL fall of the USSR. For that matter, the German Empire, presumably with a large sphere of influence of its own by 1944 in both Africa and Europe, wouldn’t necessarily be free of the risk of eventual postwar fragmentation either.

However, I don’t know if anything analogous to the OTL collapse of the USSR would be in the cards in TTL simply because I can’t see anything closely analogous to the OTL USA-USSR global military and ideological contest occurring.

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I would add that while we can’t know exactly what Turtledove himself would have focused on in a postwar TL-191 series, it is interesting that the some of the last POV characters from the former CSA who we follow, in different ways, have accepted that the war is over, and are attempting to move on with their lives.

There’s Jerry Dover, who’s attempting to get back into the restaurant business and goes out of his way not to antagonize local US military authorities.

There’s Jorge Rodriguez, who actually turns in a former Freedom Party activist who wants to restart the Freedom Party, and who does so because he doesn’t want the war to continue.

There’s Clarence Potter, who is no friend of the USA, but recognizes that further military resistance will not restore the CSA. Potter actually goes out of his way to tell an angry CS veteran who reminds him of Featherston to move on with his life.

My point being, these are not POVs that necessarily suggest a likely restoration of CS independence or the ultimate failure of US rule.

The US efforts to pursue reunion with the former CSA will not be flawless or easy. And there are definitely many paths that the postwar world could go. But after everything that’s happened to the USA in the series, by 1944, the USA has won militarily in North America, albeit at a terrible price. I cannot see the USA willingly going back to a pre-SGW situation, or pre-FGW situation, for that matter, of hostile foreign encirclement in North America and the national trauma of disunion.
How likely would you say a German collapse is?
So on this thread on SV it was pointed out that Germany would probably face massive issues post-SGWII given that it's industrial heartland would have been devastated during the war and would probably loot the ever-living fuck out of the low countries and it's colonies to help it rebuild, basically be hollowed out of young men due to suffering enormous casualties among military aged men in two meat-grinder wars in succession, and would struggle to keep down the French, British and Russians.

So ironically not too dissimilar to what happened to the Soviet Union.
 
How likely would you say a German collapse is?aNd

While there are any number of paths that the postwar German Empire could follow, I do not think that the empire would necessarily face a rapid and violent collapse.

The Germans, over time, will be faced with the demand for greater autonomy and independence from within the colonies. How the Germans respond to these kinds of developments would depend on the priorities and leadership of whichever government holds power in Berlin at any given time. The worst case scenario for the German Empire in sub-Saharan Africa could be something analogous to the conflicts that occurred in our world in Portuguese-ruled Angola and Mozambique, or in what ultimately became independent Zimbabwe.

In the end, I think that the overseas territories of the German Empire will gradually be transformed during the postwar years into something more resembling our world’s Commonwealth of Nations, albeit as a more centralized political arrangement. Although most of the empire would ultimately gain political independence from Germany, these new states would still have the Kaiser as their ceremonial head of state, and would likely continue to host German military bases, while German and Austro-Hungarian corporations would continue to have a substantial influence in the new countries. These high levels of post-independence German influence would, however, gradually fade as the independent countries themselves see the rise of new generations of nationalist leaders. The other great powers of the world will also seek to expand their own economic influence in the newly independent states at the expense of the Germans and Austro-Hungarians.

There are some overseas regions of the German Empire that could close to seek full political union with the empire itself, although I don’t think this would be a widespread postwar development.
 
do you think in TL-191 had a Edsa Revolution on February 22–25, 1986 in Philippines like trying to deposed a Japanese Governor in Manila Philippines.
 
In 1861, during the War of Secession, a little known artist named William Bauly would create two iconic pieces of American patriotic art that would be reprinted and even modernized as the United States and Confederate States endlessly clashed over the course of 82 years.


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Our Heaven Born Banner. In later iterations, the Union soldier was either edited out or the uniform was changed because the original one too closely resembled the uniform of the French Zuoaves.


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The Fate of the Rebel Flag. Later iterations would replace the burning ship with either a submarine or a modern battleship. The most recent iteration from the Second Great War replaces the Stars and Bars with the Freedom Party flag.

There also exists a lesser known, similar artistic piece by Frederic Edwin Church called Our Banner in the Sky.

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This particular piece of art became popular during the US advance into the Confederacy in 1943-1944.
 
How likely is an Austro-Hungarian collapse do you think? I've always imagined for every Central Powers victory scenario that the empire would fall sooner or later, and Austria would end up being annexed by its northern neighbor. Same with Sudetenland and the other majority-German regions.
 
How likely is an Austro-Hungarian collapse do you think? I've always imagined for every Central Powers victory scenario that the empire would fall sooner or later, and Austria would end up being annexed by its northern neighbor. Same with Sudetenland and the other majority-German regions.

Calling itself as Austria-Hungary implies that it is still stictkly dual monarchy instead reforming as multinational federation which would probably use name "Danubian Federation". That would mean no bit autonomy for other ethnic groups and since there is too Serbia annexed, I would imaginate it collapsing on Yugoslavian style civil war.
 
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Soldiers from the Australian Army Special Air Service Regiment pose for a photo with a U.S. Army Special Forces "Alpha" Team. The Fourth Pacific War marked the first instances of collaboration between the U.S., Australian, and New Zealand militaries in C.D.S. joint operations. In the Chinese and the Southeast Asian theaters, American "Grey Berets" would forge a long-lasting cooperative relationship with their Australian and New Zealand counterparts.
 
Quick question for all of you: Do you people think that super bombs (nuclear weapons) would be used after the Second Great War? Personally I doubt it but I do think people would be more "comfortable" with the idea of a superbomb war, for instance I think the likely hood of India and Pakistan going into a superbomb war is more likely in the 191 timeline compare to irl, due to people already being used to the idea of using superbombs. Because people will now know having a superbomb exchange would not cause the end of the world, it would be devastating obviously, but people would not think it would be that bad compared to how people think of the possibility of a nuclear war irl.
 
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The picture above is the scale model of the T1 Custer, a 3rd-Generation Universal Barrel (UB). It was developed and produced by General Motors during the 1980s. It replaces the Mk.3 Morell Universal Barrel and joined the Mk.5 Dowling as the frontline barrels for the armored forces of the US Army. It is armed with a 1x 120 mm smoothbore gun, 1x 20 mm autocannon, and 2x M2 HMG. This Universal Barrel is in service with several countries and served in many conflicts. The current iteration of this barrel is T1A3 Custer, equipped with a newly-developed Urban Protection System (UPS)

Current Operators:
Alyeska - 45
Argentina - 55
Australia - 100
Colombia - 75
Guyana - 35
Haiti - 30
Iran - 155
Korea - 350
Liberia - 110
Mexico - 175
The Philippines - 65
New Zealand - 75
Quebec -60
South Africa - 200
United Federation of Central America - 80
The United States of America - 5,500
Venezuela - 100
Vietnam (the Federal Republic of) - 250
 
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In 1861, during the War of Secession, a little known artist named William Bauly would create two iconic pieces of American patriotic art that would be reprinted and even modernized as the United States and Confederate States endlessly clashed over the course of 82 years.


View attachment 690609

Our Heaven Born Banner. In later iterations, the Union soldier was either edited out or the uniform was changed because the original one too closely resembled the uniform of the French Zuoaves.


View attachment 690610

The Fate of the Rebel Flag. Later iterations would replace the burning ship with either a submarine or a modern battleship. The most recent iteration from the Second Great War replaces the Stars and Bars with the Freedom Party flag.

There also exists a lesser known, similar artistic piece by Frederic Edwin Church called Our Banner in the Sky.

View attachment 690611

This particular piece of art became popular during the US advance into the Confederacy in 1943-1944.
Oh, this is good.
 
if the Confederates Canadians and French had last ditch weapons in the end of 2nd great war. any ideas.
For the Confederates perhaps drum magazine Grease guns, a cheaper and stripped down Tredegar Assault Rifle.

I believe in the last book the Confederate had few real barrels, instead using Jagdpanzer equivalents.
 
if the Confederates Canadians and French had last ditch weapons in the end of 2nd great war. any ideas.
The Canadians would have an assortment of many types of weapons likely. Smuggled guns from Britain, captured guns from the US Army, but if you're looking for "last-ditch" guns, they would likely also have improvised homemade weaponry akin to what many partisan groups had.

The Sten Gun, particularly the Mark II, is is actually a fairly good example of a potential last ditch gun made by the British. Any of the weapons they made in preparation for an invasion of the home islands in 1940 are also good examples - so basically anything the Home Guard would have been issued.

I'm not sure about France.
 
I'm not sure about France.

I could see French Home Guard units being armed with La Belle rifles.


Or maybe Berther rifles.


Both weapons were severely out of date by OTL's World War II (with the deficiencies in the Berthier being known as far back as before World War I), so the French tried replacing them with the MAS-36, but mass production didn't really get started until after World War II.

 
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A US Navy 14 inch/50 Caliber Railroad Gun firing on Confederate positions in Kentucky, circa 1915. These battleship guns were quickly pressed into service with as railroad artillery as the need for heavy artillery to smash fortified positions became very important.
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A Confederate 13.5-inch Railway being prepared to fire on Union Forces near Lubbock, Texas, circa 1916. Much like their Northern adversaries, the Confederates would too modify some of the large caliber artillery pieces originally intended for battleships into rail-based mobile artillery platforms.
 
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