Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

Walt Disney was born in Chicago, Illinois, so I don't think the CSA would use Walt Disney's characters in pro-CSA propaganda, unless they're using it in a way similar to the Vichy French cartoon Nimbus Libere or unless Disney decided to make it big in Florida rather than California.
It's based on the Vichy France cartoon.
 
US war ration books from the Second Great War. The much maligned rationing which was seen before the First Great War made a unwelcome comeback during the Second Great War and in some cases, it was stricter than it was during the latter conflict, with not having a ration book being a crime in several US jurisdictions. Rationing was also seen in former Confederate territory, with it being used to control the population in the aftermath of Freedom Party uprisings.


 
i think it is just because Disney was rumored to be a Nazi apologist irl. But i see what you mean though.
Err--but he wasn't, though. You've seen his WWII anti-Axis propaganda cartoons, right? What I think you're thinking of is his purported hatred of Jews/flagrant racism, neither of which are, in fact, true.

I can get into the whole thing if you want.
 
Err--but he wasn't, though. You've seen his WWII anti-Axis propaganda cartoons, right? What I think you're thinking of is his purported hatred of Jews/flagrant racism, neither of which are, in fact, true.

I can get into the whole thing if you want.
thank you! someone else gets it!
 

A photo of the Robert E. Lee Memorial Power Station near Richmond, circa 1940. The plant along with 61 other coal fired power stations were constructed between 1934 and 1941 throughout the Confederacy under President Featherston's Electrical Expansion Program out of a planned total of 92 power stations. Only 41 of the plants were completed by the time of Operation Blackbeard, with another 13 stations being completed during the course of the war. The Robert E, Lee Power Station was the 2nd largest to be completed and was opened in January of 1937, just in time for Robert Lee's 130th Birthday. In October of 1942, the Power Station was bombed by the Union Air Force, but only suffered minor damage. The plant would be bombed again on March 14th, 1943, and this time, the Union Air Force would cause serious damage to the station, which was out of commission for three months which hampered the Confederate War Machine. The station would be bombed for three more occasions during the war, and during the Battle of Richmond, the facility would see fierce fighting between the Union Army and the Confederate National Assault Force. After the war, the Power Station was to be restored to full operational service by the US Army Corps of Engineers to aid in the Reconstruction of the South and came under the supervision of the US Department of Energy and was renamed to the Tarrington Power Station. The station would continue to operate until the mid-1970s when a Nuclear Power Station was opened nearby to replace the aging coal fired plant and was shut down in 1976. The complex was deserted and would remain abandoned until ultimately being torn down in 1982 and the lot is now occupied by several residential buildings.

A painting of the planned Clopton Power Station (if finished, would've been the largest Power Station of the Whole Confederacy), which was an ambitious project by the Confederate Department of Electrical Energy ordered in 1939, which construction would continue until 1943 when work was halted due to the worsening war situation. The unfinished hulk of the power station was ultimately demolished in 1949.

A digitally restored image of the Charles E. Hiffords Power Station in Newport News, circa 1941. The station was named after Featherston's Chief of the Department of Electrical Energy, Charles Hiffords and was the largest completed plant in the Confederacy, which building began in 1934 and was intended to be completed in 1938, but delays in it's construction meant the station was completed in the summer of 1940, two years behind schedule. In 1941, the Union Navy would launch a failed air attack to take out the station from the USS Enterprise. The Station was ultimately destroyed by the Superbomb in 1944, and it's irradiated carcass still remain to this day along the Saint James River.
 
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A photo of the Robert E. Lee Memorial Power Station near Richmond, circa 1940. The plant along with 61 other coal fired power stations were constructed between 1934 and 1941 throughout the Confederacy under President Featherston's Electrical Expansion Program out of a planned total of 92 power stations. Only 41 of the plants were completed by the time of Operation Blackbeard, with another 13 stations being completed during the course of the war. The Robert E, Lee Power Station was the 2nd largest to be completed and was opened in January of 1937, just in time for Robert Lee's 130th Birthday. In October of 1942, the Power Station was bombed by the Union Air Force, but only suffered minor damage. The plant would be bombed again on March 14th, 1943, and this time, the Union Air Force would cause serious damage to the station, which was out of commission for three months which hampered the Confederate War Machine. The station would be bombed for three more occasions during the war, and during the Battle of Richmond, the facility would see fierce fighting between the Union Army and the Confederate National Assault Force. After the war, the Power Station was to be restored to full operational service by the US Army Corps of Engineers to aid in the Reconstruction of the South and came under the supervision of the US Department of Energy and was renamed to the Tarrington Power Station. The station would continue to operate until the mid-1970s when a Nuclear Power Station was opened nearby to replace the aging coal fired plant and was shut down in 1976. The complex was deserted and would remain abandoned until ultimately being torn down in 1982 and the lot is now occupied by several residential buildings.

A painting of the planned Clopton Power Station (if finished, would've been the largest Power Station of the Whole Confederacy), which was an ambitious project by the Confederate Department of Electrical Energy ordered in 1939, which construction would continue until 1943 when work was halted due to the worsening war situation. The unfinished hulk of the power station was ultimately demolished in 1949.

A digitally restored image of the Charles E. Hiffords Power Station in Newport News, circa 1941. The station was named after Featherston's Chief of the Department of Electrical Energy, Charles Hiffords and was the largest completed plant in the Confederacy, which building began in 1934 and was intended to be completed in 1938, but delays in it's construction meant the station was completed in the summer of 1940, two years behind schedule. In 1941, the Union Navy would launch a failed air attack to take out the station from the USS Enterprise. The Station was ultimately destroyed by the Superbomb in 1943, and it's irradiated carcass still remain to this day along the Saint James River.
Isn't that the same building used on the cover of Pink Floyd's "Animals" album?
 

A photo of the Robert E. Lee Memorial Power Station near Richmond, circa 1940. The plant along with 61 other coal fired power stations were constructed between 1934 and 1941 throughout the Confederacy under President Featherston's Electrical Expansion Program out of a planned total of 92 power stations. Only 41 of the plants were completed by the time of Operation Blackbeard, with another 13 stations being completed during the course of the war. The Robert E, Lee Power Station was the 2nd largest to be completed and was opened in January of 1937, just in time for Robert Lee's 130th Birthday. In October of 1942, the Power Station was bombed by the Union Air Force, but only suffered minor damage. The plant would be bombed again on March 14th, 1943, and this time, the Union Air Force would cause serious damage to the station, which was out of commission for three months which hampered the Confederate War Machine. The station would be bombed for three more occasions during the war, and during the Battle of Richmond, the facility would see fierce fighting between the Union Army and the Confederate National Assault Force. After the war, the Power Station was to be restored to full operational service by the US Army Corps of Engineers to aid in the Reconstruction of the South and came under the supervision of the US Department of Energy and was renamed to the Tarrington Power Station. The station would continue to operate until the mid-1970s when a Nuclear Power Station was opened nearby to replace the aging coal fired plant and was shut down in 1976. The complex was deserted and would remain abandoned until ultimately being torn down in 1982 and the lot is now occupied by several residential buildings.

A painting of the planned Clopton Power Station (if finished, would've been the largest Power Station of the Whole Confederacy), which was an ambitious project by the Confederate Department of Electrical Energy ordered in 1939, which construction would continue until 1943 when work was halted due to the worsening war situation. The unfinished hulk of the power station was ultimately demolished in 1949.

A digitally restored image of the Charles E. Hiffords Power Station in Newport News, circa 1941. The station was named after Featherston's Chief of the Department of Electrical Energy, Charles Hiffords and was the largest completed plant in the Confederacy, which building began in 1934 and was intended to be completed in 1938, but delays in it's construction meant the station was completed in the summer of 1940, two years behind schedule. In 1941, the Union Navy would launch a failed air attack to take out the station from the USS Enterprise. The Station was ultimately destroyed by the Superbomb in 1943, and it's irradiated carcass still remain to this day along the Saint James River.
The New Port News Superbomb was dropped in 1944, not 1943.
 

A photo from Camp Dependable, estimated sometime between 1938 and 1939, shown here are the Freedom Party Guards, a few black inmates, and also several white political prisoners.
 

Members of the Atlanta Ghetto Police pose for a photograph circa 1941.​

Ghetto Police (officially known as the Ghetto Auxiliary Policing Service), called 'the Negro Police' by Black Confederates, were police auxiliaries organized by the local ghetto councils called 'Negro Councils or NegCouns for short*' within the myriad of Black Confederate ghettos found throughout the many major cities of the Freedomite Confederate States of America.

Members of the Negro Police wore black or dark blue police uniforms, an identifying armband (not worn in the picture above), a custodian helmet and a badge (though chiefs wore a kepi), they weren’t allowed to carry guns but did carry batons and large knotted sticks. Also a notable feature of the Negro Police was their lack of footwear (including socks), this was done on purpose by the Freedom Party to humiliate them and in the words of Freedom Party Attorney General Ferdinand Koenig:

“To drive home the point that they (the Negro Police) are deemed as sheep dogs looking over the flock of black sheep, readying them for the slaughter.”

In ghettos where the NegroCoun was resistant to Freedomite orders, the Negro police were often used to control or just outright replace the council. One of the largest Negro police units was in the Montgomery Ghetto, where the police numbered about 2,500. The Atlanta Ghetto had about 1,200 with others having similar or smaller numbers to Atlanta’s.


A picture of the Atlanta Ghetto in 1940 (top). Harvey X. Duncan, chief of the Atlanta Ghetto Police circa 1943 (bottom).
The Negro Police was also heavily violent and severely corrupt with Harvey Xavier Duncan, the chief of the Atlanta Ghetto Auxiliary Policing Service, detailing in his memoirs the day-to-day work of the police i.e. protecting food depots, controlling employees at ghetto bakeries or other places of business, and violently putting down riots, as well as patrolling the area and confiscating food from the ghetto residents. He recounts the involvement of Negro Policemen in swindling food rations and in forcing women to provide sexual services in exchange for bread.

The Americo-Jamaican historian and Ghetto archivist Elliot Hill has described the cruelty of the ghetto negro police as "at times greater than that of the Freedom Party Guards or the regular army." The ghetto police ultimately shared the same fate with all their fellow ghetto inmates. During a ghetto’s liquidation they were either killed on–site or sent to extermination camps (usually after rounding up the ghetto residents and putting them on transports to the camps).


Elliot Hill pouring over research material for his most famous archival work “Ghettos: The Overlooked Centres of the Population Reduction” circa 1962.​

————————————————————————————

* = Though they were organised by the NegCouns, they received their orders from local Confederate military commanders, Freedom Guards leaders, or from local Freedom Party officials.
 
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Members of the Atlanta Ghetto Police pose for a photograph circa 1941.​

Ghetto Police (officially known as the Ghetto Auxiliary Policing Service), called 'the Negro Police' by Black Confederates, were police auxiliaries organized by the local ghetto councils called 'Negro Councils or NegCouns for short*' within the myriad of Black Confederate ghettos found throughout the many of the major cities of the Freedomite Confederate States of America.

Members of the Negro Police wore black or dark blue police uniforms, an identifying armband (not worn in the picture above), a custodian helmet and a badge (though chiefs wore a kepi), they weren’t allowed to carry guns but did carried batons and large knotted sticks. Also a notable feature of the Negro Police was their lack of footwear, this was done on purpose by the Freedom Party to humiliate them and in the words of Freedom Party Attorney General Ferdinand Koenig:

“To drive home the point that they (the Negro Police) are deemed as sheep dogs looking over the flock of black sheep readying them for the slaughter.”​

In ghettos where the NegroCouns was resistant to Freedomite orders, the Negro police were often used to control or outright replace the council. One of the largest Negro police units was to be found in the Montgomery Ghetto, where the police numbered about 2,500. The Atlanta Ghetto had about 1,200 with others having similar or smaller numbers to Atlanta’s.


A picture of the Atlanta Ghetto in 1940 (top). Harvey X. Duncan, chief of the Atlanta Ghetto Police circa 1943 (bottom).
The Negro Police was also heavily violent and corrupt with Harvey Xavier Duncan, the chief of the Atlanta Ghetto Auxiliary Policing Service, detailing in his memoirs the day-to-day work of the police i.e. protecting food depots, controlling employees at ghetto bakeries or other places of business, violently putting down riots, as well as patrolling the area and confiscating food from the ghetto residents. He recounts the involvement of Negro Policemen in swindling food rations and in forcing women to provide sexual services in exchange for bread.

The Americo-Jamaican historian and Ghetto archivist Elliot Hill has described the cruelty of the ghetto negro police as "at times greater than that of the Freedom Party Guards or the regular army." The ghetto police ultimately shared the same fate with all their fellow ghetto inmates. A ghetto’s liquidation they were either killed on–site or sent to extermination camps (usually after rounding up the ghetto residents and putting them on transports to the camps).


Elliot Hill pouring over research material for his most famous archival work “Ghettos: The Overlooked Centres of the Population Reduction” circa 1962.​

———————————————————————

* = Though they were organised by the NegCouns, they received their orders from local Confederate military commanders, Freedom Guards leaders, or from local Freedom Party officials.
A very interesting idea, Alpha-King98760.

It gives plausibility to the idea of some Black Confederates working with the CFP and turning over their own people in order to live a little while longer. However, I can still see some of them surviving with the help of sympathetic Confederates or acting as double agents with the USA. Regardless of some having good intentions, they would still be viewed upon as traitors.
 
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Following the Second Great War, the USA looked to mend bridges with Britain to countenance the rise of Japan, which included helping to rebuild the country. One of the ways they did so was with the mass-produced "S160" locomotive, several hundred of which were sent across the Atlantic in early 1945 along with the "S100" dock shunters.

The S160s quickly proved their worth on heavy freight duties, working alongside their Riddles WD Counterparts, as well as the Stanier 8Fs and later 9Fs. Unlike the S100 Class, which were consigned to the Southern Region, the S160s were found all over Britain, being nicknamed "Yanks" by the engine crews - partly from their American origin and also because they had a tendency to "yank" their trains along.

The last examples were withdrawn in 1993. Several are preserved, including the above example on the Keighley & Worth Valley Railway.
 
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