Photos from Featherston's Confederacy/ TL-191

(My own take of alternative history within TL-191, this time around the Bull Moose.)



President Theodore Roosevelt. (1913-1924.) Roosevelt, famous for courtless deeds from the Union's first great victory over the Confederate States to building an Central American canal and the women right to vote and National Parks, would be also the first president to break the unofficial 'two term standard' set by George Washington, crushing Upton Sinclair in the 1920 election following a powerful campaigning with dramatic speeches and tours of the USA. His first most famus action of his third term would be demand of the immediate handover of Roger Kimball to face justice in the Union.

The Confederacy cave, and soon Kimball was hung by the gallows by the United States in short order.



American soldiers marching outside of Nashville. Richmond further discredited over the 'Kimball Affair' and the defeat of the Mexican Empire, the Freedom Party saw it sudden rise to power with Jake Featherston at the head in the 1922 election. However, one of his first act was the cancelling reparations to the United States.

The result was a massive one siden beaten from the Union onto the Confederacy before the military couped and jailed Featherstone and the Freedom Party from power and sue again for peace.

Tennessee and more of Virginia was lost and the CSA was forces to agree to a even hasher treaty. The seeds for the end of the Confederate States of America was sow here.

 
(My own take of alternative history within TL-191, this time around the Bull Moose.)



President Theodore Roosevelt. (1913-1924.) Roosevelt, famous for courtless deeds from the Union's first great victory over the Confederate States to building an Central American canal and the women right to vote and National Parks, would be also the first president to break the unofficial 'two term standard' set by George Washington, crushing Upton Sinclair in the 1920 election following a powerful campaigning with dramatic speeches and tours of the USA. His first most famus action of his third term would be demand of the immediate handover of Roger Kimball to face justice in the Union.

The Confederacy cave, and soon Kimball was hung by the gallows by the United States in short order.



American soldiers marching outside of Nashville. Richmond further discredited over the 'Kimball Affair' and the defeat of the Mexican Empire, the Freedom Party saw it sudden rise to power with Jake Featherston at the head in the 1922 election. However, one of his first act was the cancelling reparations to the United States.

The result was a massive one siden beaten from the Union onto the Confederacy before the military couped and jailed Featherstone and the Freedom Party from power and sue again for peace.

Tennessee and more of Virginia was lost and the CSA was forces to agree to a even hasher treaty. The seeds for the end of the Confederate States of America was sow here.

I like it. You should expand on this and make it a story.
 

A Union soldier with his M1941 Carbine in Northern Tennessee, circa 1943.

Union soldiers advancing under fire in Northern Virginia, circa 1944.

An American Army soldier with his Springfield M1955 Battle Rifle with a grenade launcher, circa 1957.

Confederate Marines fighting in the Bahamas, circa 1943. (note one of them holding a captured Thompson SMG)
 
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Union troops marching thru Georgia.


Union troops training in ant-partisan warfare in northern Utah 1966.



OTL Bundesgrenzschutz troops circa 1960's.
 
(My own take of alternative history within TL-191, this time around the Bull Moose.)



President Theodore Roosevelt. (1913-1924.) Roosevelt, famous for courtless deeds from the Union's first great victory over the Confederate States to building an Central American canal and the women right to vote and National Parks, would be also the first president to break the unofficial 'two term standard' set by George Washington, crushing Upton Sinclair in the 1920 election following a powerful campaigning with dramatic speeches and tours of the USA. His first most famus action of his third term would be demand of the immediate handover of Roger Kimball to face justice in the Union.

The Confederacy cave, and soon Kimball was hung by the gallows by the United States in short order.



American soldiers marching outside of Nashville. Richmond further discredited over the 'Kimball Affair' and the defeat of the Mexican Empire, the Freedom Party saw it sudden rise to power with Jake Featherston at the head in the 1922 election. However, one of his first act was the cancelling reparations to the United States.

The result was a massive one siden beaten from the Union onto the Confederacy before the military couped and jailed Featherstone and the Freedom Party from power and sue again for peace.

Tennessee and more of Virginia was lost and the CSA was forces to agree to a even hasher treaty. The seeds for the end of the Confederate States of America was sow here.

Words cannot describe how happy this makes me...
 
Part Two.

Riots burning down an Confederate City. Following it third defeat, and the military coup of Featherston, the Confederacy was inflame. The public unimaginable angry and outrage at the military at both removing the rightfully elected President and again, bending over to the Union, and again, costing the CSA more of it lands.

A brief lull in the violence only lasted a few years before 1929, and the chaos of the 1930s: The Civil War of the Confederacy.



Riots by Black Confederate in Richmond, 1932. Both black and white Confederates would march on Richmond, many veterans of the Great War, and their families to demand action for them. When police attempted to turn them away after the first few days, shots were fired and the army was order to drive the protests out.


 

The aftermath of a terrorist attack on a Federal Building in Toronto by the extremist organization known as the Canadian Liberation Movement on August 1st, 1995. The bombing killed 28 Government employees and 45 innocent bystanders. This incident was the catalyst for the launching of the so-called "War on Terror" in Canada, which was a low intensity war between the US Government and the CLM waged throughout Canada.

Police Raid of a house belonging to suspected Neo-Freedomites in the city of Atlanta, circa 2012.
 
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CONFEDERADOS

The Confederados were some 10,000 to 20,000 Confederate citizens who moved to Brazil, some after the War of Secession but en masse after the final defeat and forced dissolution of the Confederate States of America after the Second Great War. Most settled in the state of Sao Paulo but can be found all throughout Brazil. The city of Virginia, Brazil was founded by these emigrants. [1]

In 1863 after the end of the War of Secession, a small number of Confederates left the region, both short-term and permanently. The most popular destination for emigration was the Brazilian Empire, where slavery remained legal.

Emperor Dom Pedro II wanted to encourage the cultivation of cotton. To that end, Dom Pedro offered the potential immigrants subsidized transport to Brazil, cheap land, and tax breaks. Confederate President Jefferson Davis and General Robert E. Lee advised Southerners against emigration, but many ignored their advice and set out to establish a new life away from the destruction of war and to cultivate wealth. [2]


Many Confederates who took the Emperor's offer had lost their lands and/or fortunes during the war. In addition, Brazil still had slavery (and did not abolish it until the Second Mexican War). Most of the immigrants were from the states of Alabama, Texas, Louisiana, Mississippi, Georgia, and South Carolina.

Dom Pedro's program was judged a success for both the immigrants and the Brazilian government. The settlers quickly gained a reputation for honesty and hard work. The settlers brought modern agricultural techniques for cotton, as well as new food crops, which spread among native Brazilian farmers. Some dishes of the American South were also adopted in general Brazilian culture, such as chess pie, vinegar pie, southern fried chicken and Texas caviar (known as salada de feijão-fradinho in Portuguese). [3]

The exact numbers are not known; estimates put the Confederados as low as 10,000 but as high as 20,000. Many slaves were transported with their masters down to Brazil until the abolition of slavery by both the Confederacy and Brazil. A high number of freedman stayed on in Brazil.

The postwar United States government was angry at the flight of Confederados to Brazil. In 1945, President Thomas Dewey and the US Congress overwhelmingly passed the Fugitive Confederate Law. This federal law prohibited citizens of the former CSA from leaving America and the occupied Confederate territories for six years. In addition, it required foreign governments to notify the USA of any Confederates entering their borders and to extradite wanted criminals (especially Freedom Party personnel) under extradition law. The law was unanimously upheld by the US Supreme Court but difficult to enforce as Brazil would not deport or extradite the Confederados. About 66 wanted war criminals were clandestinely captured by US federal agents from 1945 to 1961 with 26 being executed by hanging after military tribunal for war crimes and population reduction.[4] The Fugitive Confederate Law was officially repealed in 1962.


[1] In OTL, these emigrants founded the city of Americana, Brazil in Sao Paulo; here they give it a different name, not wanting to name their haven after their mortal enemy!
[2] In OTL, many Southerners went to Brazil not just because of lost land and money. They also went there not wanting to live under Reconstruction or thinking the South would never regain its economic strength.
[3] Just like OTL!
[4] A parallel to the hunting of escaped Nazi war criminals involved in the Holocaust from OTL.

More info here about OTL Confederados: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Confederados
 
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Museums of TL-191, Part 1.

A colorized photo of the National Institute of Military History in Richmond Virginia, circa 1905.

The National Institute of Military History was opened in 1901 as both a Institution and a Museum about the Military History of the Confederate States. The Museum originally housed exhibits and artifacts from the Colonization of North America, the American Revolution, War of 1812, First Mexican War, War of Secession, and the Second Mexican War. During the First Great War, the Institute was expanded to showcase both mockups of Confederate Weapons, but had captured Union Military Weapons and also hosted a war bond drive. During the Interwar Years, the Museum had a steady visitor stream as it had expanded to include and exhibit about the 1st Great War with artifacts and weapons from both the Confederate and Union Armies (including an M1897 Field Gun that was placed at the entrance of the Museum.) During the Second Great War, the Institute would host a war bond drive as well as having a few pieces of captured Yankee Equipment (including an M3 "Pulaski" Light Barrel that was donated to the museum in 1942 by the Confederate Military. During the war, there were post-war plans of yet another expansion to the Institute, having Confederate Weapons as well as Captured Yankee Weapons. Unfortunately on the Night of August 16th, 1943 during an air raid, a stray bomb from a Union Bomber fell on the eastern wall of the museum which caused catastrophic damage to the building, which many irreplaceable artifacts in that part of the museum were destroyed. Afterwards, the remainder of the artifacts were moved a warehouse outside of the city (except for the M3 Barrel and the many guns and artillery pieces) where they remained until war's end when it was looted by Union soldiers. The building itself saw fierce fighting between Union Army Rangers and Confederate Marine Corps during the Battle of Richmond which caused more damage. After the war the building remained as standing walls and rubble before being finally cleared in the late 1960s, following that, the lot would remain vacant until the 1980s when a new museum was built in it's place.

The front of the Confederate War Memorial Museum in Richmond, circa 2019.

In the early 1970s, both the Sons of the Confederacy and the Confederate War Veterans Association would begin a campaign for the construction of a museum dedicated to the memory of the members of the Confederate Armed Forces. Initially this would have great opposition, often accusing the organizers of the campaign of the Confederate War Memorial Museum Movement as being "Closet Neo-Freedomites." By 1983, resistance to the campaign had subsided as well as enough funding being secured for the construction of the museum. In 1984, the construction of the museum would begin and the organizers would begin asking and receiving donations for both money and artifacts from the War of Succession, 2nd Mexican War, First Great War, Mexican Civil War, and Second Great War. In 1990, the museum had opened it's doors and in that year and ever since had a good reception. The museum's exhibits included the War of Succession, 2nd Mexican War, the build up to the First Great War, the War to End All Wars, Interwar Period, The Rise of Featherston, Sins of Our Fathers (which is referring to the War Crimes committed by the Confederate Military), and the Second Great War.​
 
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Zachary Foster Burke, a former Freedom Party Guard and minor administrator at Camp Dependable during the Second Great War and the Population Reduction on trial in 1962.​

As the end of the war approached and the Yankees got closer to the camps, Burke and other Freedom Party Guards fled Texas and went their separate ways. Many fled to Brazil or other parts of South America, Burke though fled to the Second Mexican Empire – believing that the Mexican government would protect him (Burke also fled with many valuables belonging to the victims of the Population Reduction).

He was both right and wrong as the Mexican authorities only looked for and apprehended high ranking or really infamous Confederate fugitives and turned them over to the U.S. government to stand trial for their crimes against humanity. But men like Burke, who were only small cogs in the monstrous machine that was the Freedomite CSA, were able to slip past the net so to speak.

In Spring 1945, Burke settled down in the city of Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico, fell in love and married a local woman there, started a family (all the while living under the alias of “Tyler Lynch”), and acquired a job as a foreman for the local factory. As Lynch, Burke was very well loved by the community as he was a fair foreman and was very good with the children of the town, often appearing at many birthday parties and quinceañera and showering the celebrated child or children with expensive gifts (and took on many customs and traditions of Mexican society even converting to Roman Catholicism). Though the townspeople, and his family, always found it odd that Lynch never joined them in celebrating Día de Muertos and avoided contact with Orizaba's Afro-Mexican community (though most chalked it up being from the Confederacy). When Lynch’s wife asked him about why he abstained from the holiday, he said, “Celebrating the dead brings up too many bad memories of comrades lost in the war”. For you see Lynch had disclosed to the people of Orizaba that he had be a sergeant in the Confederate Army during the Second Great War (in actuality he stole the uniform of a fallen Confederate soldier as he made his way from Texas to Mexico, this soldier’s name being Tyler Lynch).

Throughout the remainder of the 1940s all the way up to early 1960s, Burke lived a quiet and peaceful life. On the night of August 9, 1962, Burke was home in his study enjoying a glass of Mexican whiskey when reporters and camera crews from Mexico’s state-run news service descended on his quiet home, being tipped off by the concerned father of a child who had snuck in and seen Freedomite memorabilia, and more importantly his Freedom Party Guard uniform, in one of Burke’s rooms (this room being secret and Burke not letting anyone see what was inside).


Burke’s house in 2019, some of his descendants still live there.​

It seemed that Burke’s past had finally caught up with him. As he attempted to flee, the former Freedom Party Guardsman was arrested by Mexican police and transported to Mexico City to stand trial for his crimes. During the proceeding, when survivors of the Population Reduction were brought in to testify, Burke remained calm and collected but when the witnesses started to detail their experiences — with some of them breaking down — he laughed cruelly and hysterically. The judge having to stop the proceeding many times to tell him to stop and that it wasn’t funny.

In the end, Zachary Foster Burke would be sentenced to death by hanging, he was only 56 years old.


Zachary Foster Burke in 1949.​
 
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is Alaska still part of Russia or has it been taken by the United States by now?
I don't know who you're asking, but I view Alaska as being cut off from Russia due to Japanese conquest of some parts of the Far East and becoming its own nation with a Romanov influence.

(My own take of alternative history within TL-191, this time around the Bull Moose.)
Interesting story.

I remember awhile ago someone was arguing how illogical it was for Roosevelt to not win a third term.

Regardless, I resolved this by including a change in my own head canon from the original story: Roosevelt dies in 1919, McKenna becomes President, but lacks the charisma and reputation to win his own term against Sinclair.

CONFEDERADOS
Nice to see this obscure part of history get mentioned.

I like your version, in general. I may have done a few changes here and there, but it's a great start.

Another missed opportunity by Dr. Turtledove.


Zachary Foster Burke, a former Freedom Party Guard and minor administrator at Camp Dependable during the Second Great War and the Population Reduction on trial in 1962.
As the end of the war approached and the Yankees got closer to the camps, Burke and other Freedom Party Guards fled Texas and went their separate ways. Many fled to Brazil or other parts of South America, Burke though fled to the Second Mexican Empire – believing that the Mexican government would protect him (Burke also fled with many valuables belonging to the victims of the Population Reduction).

He was both right and wrong as the Mexican authorities only looked for and apprehended high ranking or really infamous Confederate fugitives and turned them over to the U.S. government to stand trial for their crimes against humanity. But men like Burke, who were only small cogs in the monstrous machine that was the Freedomite CSA, were able to slip past the net so to speak.

In Spring 1945, Burke settled down in the city of Orizaba, Veracruz, Mexico, fell in love and married a local woman there, started a family (all the while living under the alias of “Tyler Lynch”), and acquired a job as a foreman for the local factory. As Lynch, Burke was very well loved by the community as he was a fair foreman and was very good with the children of the town, often appearing at many birthday parties and quinceañera and showing the celebrated child or children with expensive gifts (and took on many customs and traditions of Mexican society even converting to Roman Catholicism). Though the townspeople, and his family, always found it odd that Lynch never joined them in celebrating Día de Muertos. When Lynch’s wife asked him about why he abstained from the holiday, he said, “Celebrating the dead brings up too many bad memories of comrades lost in the war”. For you see Lynch had disclosed to the people of Orizaba that he had be a sergeant in the Confederate Army during the Second Great War, having stolen the uniform of a fallen Confederate soldier as he made his way from Texas to Mexico, this soldier’s name being Tyler Lynch.

Throughout the remainder of the 1940s all the way up to early 1960s, Burke lived a quiet and peaceful life. On the night of August 9, 1962, Burke was home in his study enjoying a glass of Mexican whiskey when reporters and camera crews from Mexico’s state-run news service descended on his quiet home, being tipped off by the concerned father of a child who had snuck in a seen Freedomite memorabilia, and more importantly his Freedom Party Guard uniform, in one of Burke’s rooms (this room being secret and Burke not letting anyone see what was inside).


Burke’s house in 2019, some of his descendants still live there.​

It seemed that Burke’s past had finally caught up with him. As he attempted to flee, the former Freedom Party Guardsman was arrested by Mexican police and transported to Mexico City to stand trial for his crimes. During the proceeding, when survivors of the Population Reduction were brought in to testify, Burke remained calm and collected but when the witnesses started to detail their experiences — with some of them breaking down — he laughed cruelly and hysterically. The judge having to stop the proceeding many times to tell him to stop and that it wasn’t funny.

In the end, Zachary Foster Burke would be sentenced to death by hanging, he was only 56 years old.


Zachary Foster Burke in 1949.​

This is, perhaps, one of the greatest extra details to TL-191 you have written so far, Alpha-King98760.

You may not have known this, but Veracruz is a state of Mexico where there is a historical Afro-Mexican population. Unless he only hangs out with the White/Mestizo elite, I can imagine him being shocked and uncomfortable being surrounded by a group of people who remind him of those he helped be murdered.

+1000 points to you for creativity and for letting the Mexican Empire still exist, along with the trial occurring in Mexico as a sign of diplomatic solidarity with the USA. :)
 
Interesting story.

I remember awhile ago someone was arguing how illogical it was for Roosevelt to not win a third term.

Regardless, I resolved this by including a change in my own head canon from the original story: Roosevelt dies in 1919, McKenna becomes President, but lacks the charisma and reputation to win his own term against Sinclair.
Just something off the top of my head, and my general love for Teddy Roosevelt, and so on. He was simply one of those larger than life people you don't get very often, and even unless likely to come again anytime soon. Even after he left the White House, he was treated by both many Americans and overseas as still being the President. (Or as one reporter said in OTL 'You have to wringer out the personality from you cloths' when meeting Teddy. )

I can see that, and it makes more sense than Rossovlet not taking reelection serious, or the people not wanting him for four more years.
 
I don't know who you're asking, but I view Alaska as being cut off from Russia due to Japanese conquest of some parts of the Far East and becoming its own nation with a Romanov influence.



Interesting story.

I remember awhile ago someone was arguing how illogical it was for Roosevelt to not win a third term.

Regardless, I resolved this by including a change in my own head canon from the original story: Roosevelt dies in 1919, McKenna becomes President, but lacks the charisma and reputation to win his own term against Sinclair.



Nice to see this obscure part of history get mentioned.

I like your version, in general. I may have done a few changes here and there, but it's a great start.

Another missed opportunity by Dr. Turtledove.




This is, perhaps, one of the greatest extra details to TL-191 you have written so far, Alpha-King98760.

You may not have known this, but Veracruz is a state of Mexico where there is a historical Afro-Mexican population. Unless he only hangs out with the White/Mestizo elite, I can imagine him being shocked and uncomfortable being surrounded by a group of people who remind him of those he helped be murdered.

+1000 points to you for creativity and for letting the Mexican Empire still exist, along with the trial occurring in Mexico as a sign of diplomatic solidarity with the USA. :)
Thank you very kindly. Though I didn’t know about the Afro-Mexicans. Perhaps I’ll add something pertaining to that in.
 
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(Ignore that subtitle below) German Mittelafrikan Askari soldier in Mittelafrika against British forces.
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German infantry later war in the Eastern Front Against Russia, notable for their camo, a recent innovation of the time.
ZiF3.jpg

German Heer in Mittelafrika, shortly post war during a exercise having a drink, the Native Askari's adopted the same pattern shown here.
Horten_H_XVIII.jpg

60s era German Horton flying wing, largely regarded as proto stealth in the modern day, yet that wasn't actually what was in mind by the engineers.
TL-191 is a German world in many ways, alongside co power United States. Germany is the big cop, you don't have to like him TTL, but much like OTL United States , if you misbehave or act too much like those fascists you will get a bit of a slap. Naturally sometimes that is used as a pretext for coups in all honesty...
 
Book cover for "Fortress Americana, the Germano Japanese Confederate War"
220px-Army_of_the_Trans-Mississippi_Flag.svg.png

(credit to @CalBear)
This TL's premise is a Confederate Victory in America, with a much reduced American puppet state, Fascist Canada (largely a continuation of British fascims) as well as its Mexican ally, facing off a Germano Japanese invasion force. The book gets into the truly nasty confederate plans, will multiple their already horrid attrocities. Though it has been criticized by many for "having a German Japanese monopoly" in the A4 (Germany, Japan, Ukraine, and and Ottoman Empire) and leaving out allied Mittelafrika on the spoils (though its s a nuclear power, sort of like India in the original timeline.) To counter this, the author reiterates he doesn't ENDROSE the A4, and while it hasn't exactly stopped the trolls from coming in, it remains a very popular timeline.
(Note - this wouldn't be a direct copy, for example, the confederates are simply unable to secure the loyalty of the US puppet that the nazis in Calbears timeline did out of France of Belgium for obvious reasons, though Canada is a different story...)
The post war world features a completely balkanized confederacy that is effectively in a pre industrial state nonetheless (not being given to America for fear of the "confederate virus" infecting the Union.)

The A4 will "cancel" troublesome powers, via orbital bombardment. Naturally, given the gneocides of many people, the confederate remnant states is essentially a global punching bag and pariah, as shown by the recent crushing of the Virginia rising. Essentially, the A4 said "listen up, we just leveled Brunswick with an orbital nuke, but if you wanna keep it up, we are fine with letting the Yankees give you a good spanking, and let me just tell you, they will give it pretty hard given your past, they got good reason to hate you." Naturally, they gave up, return to status quo, they weren't in the mood for a Yankee rampage.

Germany, Japan, Ukraine, and the Ottoman's still dominate, though Mittelafrika is catching up in all honesty.
 
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England Lives and Marches On speech
A famous speech given by the leader of the Ultranationalist British Union, Sir Oswald Mosley, in 1933.

This speech and others from Mosley were very influential to Featherston's own rhetoric. Scholars have noticed that he would sometimes paraphrase Mosley's speeches and substitute Confederate words and ideas. For example, during his Inaugural Address on March 4, 1934, the phrase "The Confederacy lives and marches on!" was found in his written notes.
 
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