Land of Sweetness: A Pre-Columbian Timeline

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Every Grass in Java, May 31, 2018.

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  1. SenatorErnesto Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2017
    I have to say this timeline just keeps getting more and more interesting by each post, well done.

    Those mercenaries that went into the Atlantic are probably all dead, with a great stroke of luck maybe they end up in Bermuda instead of dying from dehydration.
     
  2. Wolttaire Well-Known Member

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    Aug 4, 2018
    the bottom of the ocean or if they got extremely lucky they landed in Bermuda which would be awesome!
     
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  3. LunazimHawk Your Friendly Neighborhood Bengal Sultan

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    Feb 3, 2018
    Imagine the possibilities if they end up in Southern Spain... Reverse Conquista. More likely, they'll be be able to destroy some small villages before being driven away.
    Them landing in Bermuda would be an interesting thought, I'm sure the population can sustain itself from fishing.
     
  4. LostInNewDelhi Anarcho-Shaivist

    Joined:
    Oct 30, 2014
    Not only that-- they could follow the Gulf Stream northeast, which would take them to Bermuda. They could continue going that direction and end up in the Lesser Antilles. Or they could go northwest, which would take them to New Jersey... and probably fail worse than Nacan Yam, what with having only around a thousand people and all.

    EDIT: Come to think of it, being a smaller and less warlike bunch might work to these refugees' advantage. Maybe they could be peacefully adopted into a group like the Lenape, marrying into the local elite like their predecessors in Central America? Could be mutually beneficial, if done right.
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  5. corourke Member Donor

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    Jan 1, 2004
    as unlikely as a transatlantic crossing is, I doubt this is the last we've heard of them
     
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  6. AnonymousSauce The 7 Deadly Butterflies of Shaolin

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    Location:
    Ninjago
    I really want to see them end up in Spain
     
  7. SenatorErnesto Well-Known Member

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    Mar 24, 2017
    Thinking about it, I wonder what the Chesapeake Bay Area is up too right about now, if the Powhowtan confederacy hasn’t formed yet, maybe some mercenaries can form something akin to it for the future Virginians to run into?
     
  8. Every Grass in Java Well-Known Member

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    Aug 27, 2017
    See the map on Entry 18. There's been a close ATL analogue to the Powhatan confederacy (even to the point of being based in Werowocomoco), mostly because I was too lazy to think up something else, since the fourteenth century. The Apalachees that appear in yesterday's entry were also mentioned there.
     
  9. Wolttaire Well-Known Member

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    Aug 4, 2018
    yah and I don't see any reason why they wouldn't form anyway the butterflies are far enough away it would take a while to hit them
    with them only having sails there only options are what @LostInNewDelhi says
     
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  10. vlitramonster Member

    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2016
    I'm gonna take a gander here and figure ITTL Mormons are pretty much just protestant Sweetness syncretists.

    That being said, how far has Ah Ek Lemba's Feathered Serpent cult spread out at this point?
     
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  11. Threadmarks: Entry 50: Mercenaries in the South

    Every Grass in Java Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2017
    [​IMG]

    MERCENARIES IN THE SOUTH
    The number of mercenaries who fled Ah Ek Lemba’s Central America was more than twenty-five thousand. When their families are taken into account, the exile Mesoamerican population must have surpassed a hundred thousand.

    Nearly half of those went southeast, under Maya leadership. They reached the sand dunes of the Guajira Peninsula and decided to go further on, entering a great brackish lake that looped into the south. The Mesoamericans explored this lake and found a place clearly favored by the gods. Here there were terrible thunderstorms almost every other day; bolts of lightning would rage on all throughout the night and the peal of thunders shake the earth before you could count to ten.

    “This is the land of Cháak,” the Maya rain god, whispered the mercenaries.

    They decided to settle here. The local Wayuu tribes offered resistance, but one much too insufficient to drive off the Mesoamericans. A new capital was founded where the lake met the sea—they called it Lelem Cháakkaj, “Lightning Cháak-Town”—and the Maya erected a great pyramid to Cháak in thanks. It was the southernmost frontier of Mesoamerican civilization.

    The other half—some 55,000 Mesoamericans—went south to Lakekala’s Siki Empire in 1408. Lakekala Siki did not go on major campaign from 1402 to 1408, and he was personally present in Jocay-Picoaza to supervise the dissolution of the Mesoamerican community into fourteen militarized chiliads. Four were settled in highland Ecuador; five accompanied the emperor into Muisca country during the 1409—1414 conquest; the final five were sent to the newly conquered Chimú lands.

    The Mesoamerican communities thus began their gradual assimilation into the Siki state apparatus. But it was the slow and halting sort of assimilation, and independent Mesoamerican identities still persisted in the sixteenth century.

    There are well-known legends that go that some of the five chiliads settled in the south escaped Siki control. Such tales find no corroboration in Siki sources…
     
  12. Threadmarks: Entry 51: The Sons of Inti

    Every Grass in Java Well-Known Member

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    A translation from Quechua of Inca mythistory

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    THE SONS OF INTI

    Intip Churikunan



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    It was in the days of Yawar Waqaq Inka [r. 1380?—1410?] that the tyrant king Yana Wichiq [“Black Feller”] took power in Chincha Hatun Llaqta [“Great Northern City”].

    “I am the creator god Wiraqucha,” blasphemed this Yana Wichiq, “And I will kill all those who will not accept this truth.”

    Most people humored him—"Indeed you are Wiraqucha!"—but one or two out of every ten were true to their hearts. And Yana Wichiq’s face turned red. “Who dares disobey me when I said I would kill them all! Tomorrow I will tear out their hearts and savor the odor of their blood.”

    That night, the god Wiraqucha appeared in the dreams of Qarqusqa Yupanki [“Honorable Exile”], an esteemed nobleman of Chincha Hatun Llaqta who had opposed Yana Wichiq. “I am Wiraqucha, the real Wiraqucha. Know that Yana Wichiq is about to kill you, so take a vial of arrow poison and flee! I have set out a place for you in the distant south. Take your countrymen; I give you and your lineage authority over them.” “What lineage could you mean, o god? I have but a daughter.” “You will see.”

    Qarqusqa Yupanki took the men who had rejected Yana Wichiq’s divinity. He counted their numbers, organized them into five chiliads, and fled south on great sailing boats.



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    Yana Wichiq sent his admiral, Yaku Kuntur [“Water Condor”], after Qarqusqa Yupanki.

    The fleets of Yaku Kuntur were feared throughout the world. His warships were the largest that any had ever seen, spewing out fire and scalding slingstones, yet themselves untouchable by any fire because of the hides of fantastic animals they were draped in. The people called the ships the pumas of the oceans, so fast and powerful were they.

    Yana Wichiq, Yaku Kuntur’s master, was renowned as a sorcerer. He had even created life; his admiral Yaku Kuntur was not in fact a human born of a woman, but Yana Wichiq’s index finger into which he had breathed a soul. As part of Yana Wichiq’s body and figment of Yana Wichiq’s magic, the admiral partook in the tyrant king’s sorcery. In particular, he could turn into a condor and fly above the seas.

    Qarqusqa Yupanki’s men despaired. No matter how fast they sailed, the condor would always track them down. They were doomed. Some of them began speaking of killing Qarqusqa Yupanki and returning to Chincha Hatun Llaqta.

    “Do not fear,” said Qarqusqa Yupanki. “If we are captured, I will say that I took you all against your will, and only I will be killed.”

    So the exiles anchored their boats off a craggy part of the shore and waited, their hearts beating wild.

    Then a thick mist set upon the seas.

    Yaku Kuntur took his condor-form and soared above the waters, knowing that the fugitives would soon be ferreted out. But the condor saw nothing but a thick mist over the seas. He soared again the next day: still nothing but the mist, growing ever thicker. He soared a third time and still could see nothing amid the mist, now so thick that it merged with the clouds. Yaku Kuntur flew back to Yana Wichiq and reported that Qarqusqa Yupanki was lost.

    When the condor flew away, the mist receded at once. The exiles cheered and continued to make their way.



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    At last, Qarqusqa Yupanki reached Jocay, the city of the Sikis, the greatest city on earth.

    Lakekala Siki was then emperor. He had just conquered the Chimú, and he saw that the new people of Qarqusqa Yupanki could be useful in pacifying that land.

    “O Northerners!” Said the greatest emperor in the world. “I permit you to dwell near my southern borders, so long as you accept the laws of the land. And I swear by my gods, by Peayán and Yoa’pá, that I will deprive you not of your swords [chaska chuki in Quechua] nor of your shields [wallqanqa in Quechua] nor of your ayllu [“clan / family” in Quechua; “penis” in Aymara, a language spoken near Quechua].”

    Qarqusqa Yupanki thanked him effusively, and the five chiliads were settled along the coast.



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    The next year, Lakekala Siki sent his subordinate, Chiki Tuku, to Qarqusqa Yupanki’s community of Northerners.

    “Are you following the laws of the land?” Asked Chiki Tuku. “We are indeed,” replied Qarqusqa Yupanki. Chiki Tuku feigned suspicion and entered all the Northerners’ houses, but there was nothing wrong in sight.

    “There is a new law in the land,” Chiki Tuku then said. “You must give up your swords [chaska chuki “sword”] immediately. The emperor has requisitioned them.”

    “The emperor swore by his gods, by Peayán and Yoa’pá, that this would never come to pass.”

    “You misheard him. He never said that he would not deprive of your swords. What he said is this: ‘I will never deprive you from misfortune [chaska chiki “star foretelling misfortune”].’”

    “If only he would deprive us of misfortune, and not our swords!” Cried Qarqusqa Yupanki. But he was so grateful to Lakekala that he accepted the demand.



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    The next year, Lakekala Siki sent Chiki Tuku, once more, to Qarqusqa Yupanki’s community of Northerners.

    “Are you following the laws of the land?” Asked Chiki Tuku. “We are indeed,” replied Qarqusqa Yupanki. Chiki Tuku feigned suspicion and entered all the Northerners’ houses, but there was nothing wrong in sight.

    “There is a new law in the land,” Chiki Tuku then said. “You must give up your shields [wallqanqa “shield”] immediately. The emperor has requisitioned them.”

    “The emperor swore by his gods, by Peayán and Yoa’pá, that this would never come to pass.”

    “You misheard him. He never said that he would not deprive of your shields. What he said is this: ‘I will never prevent the Northerner from crying out in grief, for surely he will weep [waqanqa “he will cry”].’”

    Qarqusqa Yupanki cried out in grief and said, “If only he would not give me cause to weep here, instead of depriving us of our shields!” But he was still grateful to Lakekala and accepted the demand.



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    The next year, Lakekala Siki sent Chiki Tuku, a final time, to Qarqusqa Yupanki’s community of Northerners.

    “Are you following the laws of the land?” Asked Chiki Tuku. “We are indeed,” replied Qarqusqa Yupanki. Chiki Tuku feigned suspicion and entered all the Northerners’ houses, but there was nothing wrong in sight.

    “There is a new law in the land,” Chiki Tuku then said. “We must split up your families [ayllu “family” in Quechua] and scatter them. The emperor has decreed it.”

    “The emperor swore by his gods, by Peayán and Yoa’pá, that this would never come to pass.”

    “You misheard him. That sentence was in Aymara, and you still have not been castrated [ayllu “penis” in Aymara].”

    “You are mad,” said Qarqusqa Yupanki. He bound Chiki Tuku, castrated him, beat him until he wept, and finally strangled him under an ill-fortuned star. Then the Northerners fled before the Sikis could enter in pursuit.


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    On a litter born by burly men, Lakekala Siki came personally to chase Qarqusqa Yupanki. The Siki armies were swift on the mountains; the Northerners, inexperienced and clumsy. Lakekala soon tracked them down and gave battle.

    Qarqusqa Yupanki was the first to die, when a sling stone fell upon his head.

    “The enemy chief is dead,” said Lakekala, “The day is won. The fugitives will return now—only a matter of waiting.”

    So the Sikis withdrew. The Northerners could not weep; their despair was so deep that their tears all ran out.


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    Qarqusqa Yupanki had only one child, a daughter called Mama Qispirumi (“Obsidian Mother”).

    Mama Qispirumi huddled in her cotton blankets. Her father was still in her eyes: the cry of anguish, the bloodied face, the skull broken in, the empty eyes—she found she could not cry—and her father came to her again, and with him the realization that there was nothing she could do, and she would die far away amid these strange and foreboding mountains—she remembered the sunlit streets of Chincha Hatun Llaqta, and missed them bitterly. It was winter here, in the Andean deserts, and the world was white and bleak.

    That night, the sun god Inti came to her in a dream.

    “Cross the mountains still! There is a husband and a place for you there.”

    Mama Qispirumi doubted, but still she obeyed.


    [​IMG]

    The next day, Mama Qispirumi announced her dream of Inti to the Northerners. Few of them believed her. Half of them wanted to return to Siki territory; another two-fifths were led by a certain Lluchkaq [“One who Slips”], who sought to bolster his own authority by marrying Mama Qispirumi.

    The former began their trek back to the coast as Lluchkaq approached Mama Qispirumi, attempting to court her. “No,” she said. “Inti tells me that a husband awaits me beyond those mountains.”

    “Your dreams sound like dog-dreams. Maybe you were sun-sick and hallucinated? It would be right to have a man in your life.”

    As he was saying this, Mama Qispirumi ran. She entered the depths of the mountains and found a grotto to hide in, but she was only a woman and not strong enough, and within hours Lluchkaq was in front of the grotto. It was a sunny day—the frozen-solid snow before the grotto was beginning to thaw—and Mama Qispirumi thought it bitterly ironic that the Sun was seeing this all.

    “Undress now,” said Lluchkaq, “Let us consummate our union.” And he laughed at the thought that the woman before him was his.

    “There is nothing I can do now,” admitted Mama Qispirumi. “But leave me some scrap of dignity. Approach me as I undress, but looking up, not at me. When I am undressed, I will give you the word.”

    Lluchkaq chuckled and looked up. The Sun peeked out of the clouds and blinded him, but still he looked up as he walked forward, not wanting to show weakness before his soon-to-be wife.

    Then, the light of Inti in his eyes, Lluchkaq slipped on the thawing snow. He let out a single guttural cry as his head cracked open on an oddly shaped rock and his body spilled, lifeless, down the mountainside.



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    Mama Qispirumi returned, took control of Lluchkaq’s men, and crossed the Andes east.

    Many died in the journey, and those who lived were battered by the cold and tired by the wind, but they took heart. They had heard that Lakekala had deported the half who had chosen to return to exile in Sogamoso and Bogotá, and they knew there was no place to go but east.

    Finally they reached the highland valley of the Taramas. The Tarama king asked Mama Qispirumi’s hand in marriage. Inti told her to rebuff him, and so she did. “Let us see then, woman,” the king said, “How you fare in these mountains with no llamas.”

    The Taramas thus hid all their llamas. But the Northerners ran into a herd of albino guanacos (wild llamas) who willingly carried all their packs for them.

    Thus bidding the Taramas farewell, the Northerners reached the valley of the Wankas. The Wanka king, too, asked Mama Qispirumi’s hand in marriage. Inti told her to rebuff him, and so she did once more. “Let us see then, woman,” the king said, “How you fare in these mountains with no potatoes and no water.”

    The Wankas thus concealed all their potatoes and blocked all their wells. But the Northerners found that whatever plant they dug out of the earth, even the feeblest weeds, had potatoes for roots. And rain fell so thick that there was no need for wells to drink, but the roads they walked upon were left miraculously dry.


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    Thus bidding the Wankas farewell, the Northerners reached the country of the Chankas.

    The Chankas were a people who would take their neighbors as prisoners and hang them upside-down. Then they would skin them alive, starting from the front of the toes, so that the victims would see their own blood stream down their body and pool beneath their suspended heads. Once the victims bled to death, they would drink their blood in cups made of their skulls.

    It was the king of such a people who asked Mama Qispirumi’s hand in marriage. She was terrified, but she knew such a barbaric man could never please her. In any case, Inti told her to rebuff him as well, and so she did.

    The Chanka king announced that if he could not have Mama Qispirumi as a wife, he would have her as his cup and drink instead.

    The Chankas were many and the Northerners few, and Mama Qispirumi knew that she could not defeat them in war. She made a suggestion. “Let you and I face off in single combat, club-to-club. I am a woman, and you are a man. You will surely win.” “Surely! And I will let you use any weapon you wish, to show that I can defeat you no matter what you will. If you kill me in any way at all, I vow by my gods that the Chankas will let you go.”

    Mama Qispirumi took out her bow and her quiver of obsidian-headed arrows, and applied the poison which her father had taken from Chincha Hatun Llaqta to the tips of the arrowheads. The day of the fight, the Chanka king charged like a maniac, shield and pike in hand. The woman fired a single arrow. Her arms were not strong, and the arrow only grazed the king’s hand. He laughed at the poor aim. Then his laughter turned to screams—he fell to the earth—then the screams were over and the king was dead.

    The Chankas muttered of cowardice. But a vow was a vow, and the Northerners were left unscathed.


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    Thus bidding the Chankas farewell, the Northerners reached Qusqu, the city of the Inkas.

    When the Northerners had fled Chincha Hatun Llaqta, Yawar Waqaq Inka had been Sapa Inka, or ruler, but he had died before the exodus of Mama Qispirumi. The new Sapa Inka was named Hatun Tupaq Inka, and he was engaged to a woman from the Anta kingdom to the west.

    As Mama Qispirumi made her way across the peaks, the creator god Wiraqucha came to Hatun Tupaq Inka in a vision. He said:

    “The woman who comes to Qusqu is your wife to be. She will bear your children, and your lineage will surpass all the kings of the earth.”

    Hatun Tupaq Inka recounted his dream to his tutor, Walpa Rimachi, who called out to him, astonished: “O Wiraqucha Inka! Break off this engagement with the Anta woman.” Henceforth Hatun Tupaq Inka was called Wiraqucha Inka, after the god he had seen.

    Mama Qispirumi had a vision too. She met the sun god Inti again, who told her:

    “The man who is in Qusqu is your husband to be. He will sire your children, and your lineage will surpass all the kings of the earth.”


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    The Antas attacked Qusqu in retaliation for the broken engagement. The war was hard-fought, and no woman seemed to come.

    The two armies met at last at the Valley of Amankay, both sides arranging their forces into a center and two flanks and charging. Then the right flank of the Incas gave way and the Inca center came under attack from both front and right. Wiraqucha Inka ordered a counteroffensive, seeking to cleave the Anta army in half and relieve the pressure on the right. He ran to the head of his armies, swinging his sling and hurling stone after stone, but the Incas gained only a little ground. The Anta king roared and his troops rushed forth again, pushing back the Incas and retaking in a matter of minutes all they had lost. The Incas began to retreat in disorder, their shields thrown aside, stumbling on their fallen comrades’ limbs.

    “Perhaps it was a mistake,” muttered Wiraqucha Inka as he saw the broken corpse of Walpa Rimachi, “Perhaps it was some minor spirit, not Wiraqucha. Perhaps I saw wrong.”

    Then the Antas relieved their pressure, and the Incas began to advance again. “The king is dead! Attack from the rear”—Wiraqucha was not sure whose soldiers were saying this, but he did not feel that he was dead, and there seemed to be no enemy when he looked behind his head, so the dead king and the rear must both be the enemy’s—and soon the Antas were in open flight, escaping the battlefield that had been theirs just moments ago. It was a miracle from Inti. Mounted on his litter, Wiraqucha Inka was the first to see the leader of this new army that had attacked the Anta from the rear and broken their ranks, and he knew that his vision had indeed been that of his namesake god.


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    Wiraqucha Inka and Mama Qispirumi married shortly after. The night of their marriage, Wiraqucha and Inti came to them again. “You will have a son,” said the gods, “a child of South and North, and he will be one who shakes the earth [pachakutiq]. Your clan and descendants will be mighty kings, sovereign lords and universal rulers, worshippers of the gods and benefactors of the poor, from sea to sea.

    "They will be the sons of Inti, and the sons of Inti do not perish [Intipmi Churikunan chinkankuchu].”


    * * *


    By 1400, the Inca state of Cuzco/Qusqu was already the strongest state in the southern Andean highlands IOTL. TTL’s Siki expansion along the coast hasn’t significantly affected the highlands yet, so Qusqu’s position as a major power—and its potential to create the Americas’ greatest empire—remains largely untouched. See Terence N. D’Altroy’s The Incas: Second Edition, “Chapter Three: The Incas before the Empire.”

    The Taramas, the Wankas, and the Chankas were all historical peoples. The Taramas and the Wankas were organized into “moderately complex chiefdoms” in this period, and there’s a short section on them in “Chapter 38: Between Horizons” in The Handbook of South American Archaeology. The Chankas were an early enemy of the Incas, renowned for their cruelty and supposedly vanquished by Pachacuti as the first step in the Inca unification of the Andes. Many historians think it unlikely that the Chankas could have been a serious rival to the Incas; even the largest Chanka town is less than a fourth the size of even pre-imperial Qusqu, and the description of Chanka barbarism might be just a bit too clichéd. Still, this entry itself is Inca mythistory and not a narration of what really happened. So insulting the Chankas goes well with the nature of the text.

    Most of the Quechua names and terminology are taken from a trilingual dictionary here.

    Hatun Tupaq Inka, the eighth Inca ruler, really did rename himself Wiraqucha Inka, after the Inca creator god Wiraqucha, following a vision he had of the deity at the god’s shrine center in Urcos. The Spaniard Sarmiento’s 1572 Historica Indica, usually considered a fairly reliable testimony of how the Incas viewed their own history, says (from MacCormack, Religion in the Andes, p. 353):

    [At Urcos], where there is the magnificent huaca [wak’a “cult object”] of Ticci Viracocha [Tiqsi Wiraqucha, the Inca creator god], one night Viracocha appeared to him [Hatun Tupaq Inka]. In the morning, he called together his nobles, one of whom was Gualpa Rimache [Walpa Rimachi], his tutor, and told him how that night Viracocha had appeared to him and promised him and his descendants great good fortune. Gualpa Rimache congratulated and saluted him with the name “O Viracocha Inca!”… And this name he kept for the rest of his life.
    Shoutout to @King of the Uzbeks.
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
  13. Neoteros Dux Mediolani

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    Duchy of Milan
    ...damn.

    Just... okay, this was epic.

    Quite literally. If Ah Ek Lemba's the Alexander of Mesoamerica, Mama Qispirumi's the Ulysses of the Andes.

    And it's nice to see that ships are bridging the gap between North and South - Jared Diamond may be full of shit, but it's hard to argue against his theory about America's North/South divide having been one of the reasons behind the continent's bad luck in 1492.
     
  14. LostInNewDelhi Anarcho-Shaivist

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    Oct 30, 2014
    Interesting that the Inca see Wiraqucha as a universal god, capable of commanding the allegiance of foreigners and leading them on a grand Mosaic adventure. It even ends with a Covenant, except it's one of marriage and not a giving of laws :p
     
  15. Every Grass in Java Well-Known Member

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    Aug 27, 2017
    Inca religion had some similar tendencies even IOTL. From D'Altroy's The Incas:

    The Incas themselves proclaimed that they were driven by a divine mandate to spread the religion of the Creator God Wiraqocha [sic], the Sun god Inti, and the other deities, to the rest of humanity. Rowe (1946: 280) notes that such a directive sounds suspiciously like crusading Christianity, but that there is little doubt of its aboriginal character by the early sixteenth century.​

    From "Inca Sacred Landscapes in the Titicaca Basin" in The Oxford Handbook of the Incas:

    The Inca primordial couples were the first to be created and were the favorites of Viracocha [sic], and the sun himself gave them an explicit mandate to rule over other Andean groups... The common origins of all people at Tiwanaku at the hands of Viracocha justified their unification under a larger hierarchical structure. By associating themselves with Viracocha and his creative powers, Inca emperors claimed special legitimacy as pan-Andean rulers. Inca imperial expansion recapitulated Viracocha's journey across the Andes, reuniting the descendants of the primordial couples he had created.​
     
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  16. Falecius Well-Known Member

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    Anarres
    Sounds suspiciously similar to the Romans' Capitoline Jupiter, and the Assyrian cult of Assur.
     
  17. Wolttaire Well-Known Member

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    Aug 4, 2018
    Are any gods of the north going to be adopted by the Inca?
     
  18. Neoteros Dux Mediolani

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    Convergent evolution, probably: both Cusco and Rome were at the center of imperialistic polities that were centered on a semi-divine figure (the Inca and the Emperor) and were far more advanced than the surrounding states, at least in theory.
     
  19. Falecius Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, I was not suggesting diffusion or biased interpretation by (Spanish) sources.
     
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  20. SenatorErnesto Well-Known Member

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    Mar 24, 2017
    I shook with awe when I read that final line, amazing shoutout to another amazing timeline!
     
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