WI Louis of Spain lives?

Louis became King of Spain after the abdication of Philip V on January 1724 but then died of smallpox a few months later, the throne then reverting to his father. Some say Elisabeth of Farnese poisoned him.

What if he had survived? Apparently he didn't care much about Spain's former Italian posessions, and wanted to focus on America instead. But I can't find any sources on what that involves exactly. What else would be different?
 
Louis became King of Spain after the abdication of Philip V on January 1724 but then died of smallpox a few months later, the throne then reverting to his father. Some say Elisabeth of Farnese poisoned him.

What if he had survived? Apparently he didn't care much about Spain's former Italian posessions, and wanted to focus on America instead. But I can't find any sources on what that involves exactly. What else would be different?
He died of smallpox (and in any case would be pretty unlikely who his stepmother poisoned him)
 
Farnese had a lot to gain by returning Philip to the throne. With Philip, Farnese is practically running the country until he dies (or abdicates again). With Louis, it's only a matter of time before her influence is greatly diminished.


I don't think enough is known about Louis to say what direction he would have lead the country. Probably less interest in recovering Italy. Spain didn't recover Italy directly, OTL, but installed Farnese offspring. Louis probably would not go through the trouble for them.

There's also the young Queen, who exhibited bizarre behavior (modern psychiatrists think it was a personality disorder). Does she grow out of it, or is she a national embarrassment sent off to a convent after giving birth to an heir?

Could butterfly the anglo-spanish war of mid-late 20's, which may then affect the causus belli of the War of Jenkins Ear.
 
Farnese had a lot to gain by returning Philip to the throne. With Philip, Farnese is practically running the country until he dies (or abdicates again). With Louis, it's only a matter of time before her influence is greatly diminished.


I don't think enough is known about Louis to say what direction he would have lead the country. Probably less interest in recovering Italy. Spain didn't recover Italy directly, OTL, but installed Farnese offspring. Louis probably would not go through the trouble for them.

There's also the young Queen, who exhibited bizarre behavior (modern psychiatrists think it was a personality disorder). Does she grow out of it, or is she a national embarrassment sent off to a convent after giving birth to an heir?

Could butterfly the anglo-spanish war of mid-late 20's, which may then affect the causus belli of the War of Jenkins Ear.
Never said who Elisabeth Farnese would not benefit greatly from Louis’ death but only who the accusation against her were pure slander and who she would not have poisoned him in any case...
Wishing the death of her stepsons? Yes, likely. Doing anything for it? No, not at all...
 
Don Carlos will marry Maria Theresa in this scenario.
Considering who right now don Carlos is engaged to the younger sister of the actual Queen of Spain is pretty unlikely... Louis I will be forced to put aside his wife soon enough so either he remarry to his brother’s bethroted or Charles (heir presuntive of both Parma and Tuscany) will stay engaged to Philippine
 
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Never said who Elisabeth Farnese would not benefit greatly from Louis’ death but only who the accusation against her were pure slander and who she would not have poisoned him in any case...
Wishing the death of her stepsons? Yes, likely. Doing anything for it? No, not at all...
Is this based on anything in her history?

She is known to be a ruthless, manipulative woman with a hunger for power.

I'd say it is just as likely she is a prime suspect as it is that she had nothing to do with it.
 
Is this based on anything in her history?

She is known to be a ruthless, manipulative woman with a hunger for power.

I'd say it is just as likely she is a prime suspect as it is that she had nothing to do with it.
Yes, she was this but was not the kind of woman to kill people for getting what she wanted.
Plus Louis clearly died for smallpox so in no way she can have been involved
 
Wasn't Louis's wife like 14? She was probably just a tomboyish teenager being herself.
I read on Wikipedia I think that she appeared to manifest all the symptoms of a major personality disorder and her behaviour was certainly bizarre. Had her husband lived, it's possible she would have calmed down a bit. I think she did nurse him at the end and caught smallpox herself (though survived).

I agree that Elizabeth Farnese would have wanted Louis out of the way so her own sons could be advanced. However, if he died of smallpox, she can't be accused of poisoning him, and even if he'd survived, I'm not sure she would have resorted to poison to get him out of the way.

There's actually a very good French film "The Royal Exchange" which is on Youtube in its entirety which deals with the marriage of Louis and his wife, and also the engagement of Louis XV and his Spanish cousin, the Infanta Marianna Victoria, who ended up being sent back to Spain in 1725 because Louis was 15 and the French wanted to get him breeding, but Marianna was still only 7! The French seem to have really liked her though, and she did end up as Queen of Portugal.
 
He died of smallpox (and in any case would be pretty unlikely who his stepmother poisoned him)
IDK, Felipe V signed his abdication while he was in the confessional, and Isabel was so furious when she found out, she had Felipe V followed to make sure he didn't do it again.
 
IDK, Felipe V signed his abdication while he was in the confessional, and Isabel was so furious when she found out, she had Felipe V followed to make sure he didn't do it again.
And there is a big difference between that and poisoning her stepson.
Would a Civil War between Louis and his half-brothers (manipulated by Farnese) be possible?
No way. Charles is already settled with Parma and Tuscany so will not suffer for being landless if he can not get support for conquering Naples.
 
What would the the worst case if Louis does seek an annulment of his marriage with Louise Elisabeth d'Orleans? How angry would France get, really? Also what is the worst that Farnese can do against Louis, or would she just resign to not be as influential anymore and leave for France/Italy?
 
What would the the worst case if Louis does seek an annulment of his marriage with Louise Elisabeth d'Orleans? How angry would France get, really? Also what is the worst that Farnese can do against Louis, or would she just resign to not be as influential anymore and leave for France/Italy?
She’d probably resign to not being influential and may retire to her sons territories
 
I see. Anyone knows what his plans for America might have been? For example, the Wikipedia page says the following.

Louis ruled for a short period between the time his father Philip V abdicated in his favour (14 January 1724) and his death from smallpox, just over seven months later. King Philip sent him a letter informing him of his decision. He calls his son a great king. Louis sent his father a humble reply thanking him and signed his letter as Prince of Asturias. His marital problems dominated during his reign. His father kept tabs on him from San Ildefonso. To counter his father's influence, he surrounded himself with officials who had not served under Philip. His plans were to focus more on the American colonies rather than the lost Italian territories. On his death, his father returned to the throne, and reigned until his own death in 1746. Louis was buried in the Cripta Real del Monasterio de El Escorial part of the El Escorial complex.

It doesn't cite a source. Spanish language sources I've found say basically the same, that he had plans for the American colonies, but none elaborate.
 
Charles Petrie's book on Charles III infers that Luis had at least an amenable relationship with his half brothers. It seems that Luis was just a generally nice person (not saying anything about his competence as a leadership, just for personal interactions) and that made for positive relations with his half brothers. I imagine Luis would help establish Charles as the Duke of Parma and possibly even Tuscany. However, Naples and Sicily are less likely without Isabel Farnese being queen-consort.
 
What would the the worst case if Louis does seek an annulment of his marriage with Louise Elisabeth d'Orleans? How angry would France get, really? Also what is the worst that Farnese can do against Louis, or would she just resign to not be as influential anymore and leave for France/Italy?
Pretty unlikely to happen, unless France started the question sending back Mariana Victoria (and I do not believe who Bourbon would be so stupid to doing that with Louis as King of Spain). Louise Elisabeth had brought a very fat dowry and was still only 14 years old at her husband’s death.

Charles Petrie's book on Charles III infers that Luis had at least an amenable relationship with his half brothers. It seems that Luis was just a generally nice person (not saying anything about his competence as a leadership, just for personal interactions) and that made for positive relations with his half brothers. I imagine Luis would help establish Charles as the Duke of Parma and possibly even Tuscany. However, Naples and Sicily are less likely without Isabel Farnese being queen-consort.
Parma and Tuscany were Charles’ inheritance from his mother’s family so Louis would be obliged to support his brother there, specially as Charles is engaged to Philippe Elisabeth d’Orléans, younger sister of his own wife.
 
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