WI Fascist Germany goes straight for the Polish Corridor before attempting Anschluss

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by ColeMercury, Nov 7, 2011.

  1. ColeMercury is male, FYI

    Joined:
    Apr 7, 2007
    Location:
    Republic of Australia
    Just a thought -- how might it have gone if fascist Germany (not necessarily Nazis specifically, depending on how far back the POD is) had primarily concentrated on regaining lost territory rather than pursuing a pan-Germanist agenda? In OTL, they let their former territory remain as part of Poland (West Prussia and Posen) while they annexed land which, pre-WW1, had belonged to somebody else (Austria & Czechoslovakia). If they had gone straight for Poland instead, would the other European powers have let it go in the same way they let Czechoslovakia go in OTL?
     
  2. Enigmajones Ours Is The Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Look behind you
    An economic collapse. They needed those Austrian Gold reserves. Plus, Poland won't give up the corridor, no matter the circumstances. The only way they get the corridor is by force.
     
  3. KACKO Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 12, 2010
    And what about 15t of gold from Czechoslovakia in 1938 for monetary reform in occupied Sudetland and later additional Czechoslovak gold in 1939? Czechoslovakia had over 90 t of gold reserves in September 1938.
     
  4. Enigmajones Ours Is The Fury

    Joined:
    Jul 26, 2008
    Location:
    Look behind you
    They got that AFTER the Anschluss. The Anschluss proved to Hitler that he could act in pretty much anyway he wanted. Pre-Anschluss Germany was afraid that the annexation would cause a war with Italy, a war they knew they would lose. Without the Anschluss the Germans don't have the balls to go after the Sudeten.
     
  5. MSZ Banned

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2011
    War with Poland. It's as simple as that. France would likely get involved soon after that. If the invasion happens before 1939, Germany is likely to be halted, and getting the Rheinland occupied. If it happens after 1939, then without the Anschluss and Czechia it would still be significantly more difficult to overcome the Allies.
     
  6. I Blame Communism Banned

    Joined:
    Nov 12, 2008
    Location:
    Class-*khachoo!*
    The big question is: what does the corridor have for Germany, besides a grudge? Compared to Austria and Czechia, peanuts. Poland would fight for it, so why fight for something of so little value?

    The Nazis actually maintained strained-but-normal relations with Poland from 1933 to 1939. Keeping Poland at arm's length from the French security system, and being separated from the USSR, made obvious strategic sense. Some in Britain wrongly but understandably wrote Poland off as a German ally.

    Way to change that assessment. You're going to war, a war you may well not win, for nothing much of value.
     
  7. yourworstnightmare Trubbelmakare

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2007
    Location:
    Tusen Sjöars Land
    A different German government than the Nazis might have done just that, and ended up fighting a war with Poland not really worth it (oh the Germans would win, if France don't get involved, but at what cost?) Are we assuming this happen in '38 or '39, since there is a big difference. If it happen at the same date as OTL and Germany have built up their forces as OTL (as much as they could without Austrian resources) they'd do much better than tehy'd if they went relatively unprepared in '38.
     
  8. Caesar Australis Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 13, 2011

    The corridor was the transit route for most of Poland's imports and exports. So taxing such transit would be a valuable source of revenue for Germany.
     
  9. Cook Real friends stab you in the front.

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2010
    Location:
    this side of the Black Stump.
    Germany signed a non-aggression pact with Poland in 1934. It was this action that had given Hitler the secure eastern border he needed while reoccupying the Rhineland, absorbing Austria by intimidation and then Czechoslovakia. Had he been making belligerent speeches right from the start demanding the ‘corridor’, which he’d pretty much needed to have done for him to get the people revved up for a war with Poland he’d never have been able to sign the pact, or he’d have torn it up almost as soon as he’d signed it. Either way he’d have been facing a very powerful Polish nation when Germany was only just beginning to really build up its army. And a Poland that was allied with France at that. Germany at the time had no strategic depth and was extremely vulnerable.