The Story of a Party 2.0

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Utgard96, Nov 29, 2011.

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  1. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    I have retconned some of the Confederate government positions. For a start, the CAS now lacks a Vice President; instead it has a Senate President, who has many of the same duties. Robert Toombs holds this office, instead of William Yancey. This was done as a concession to the moderates in Congress.

    As such, the Confederate Cabinet now looks like this:

    President of the Confederacy: John A. Quitman (Mississippi)

    Secretary of State: Robert Barnwell Rhett (South Carolina)
    Secretary of War: Jefferson F. Davis (Mississippi)
    Attorney General: Leroy P. Walker (Alabama)
    Secretary of the Treasury: David Levy Yulee (Florida)
    Secretary of the Navy: Stephen R. Mallory (Florida)
    Postmaster General: Sterling Price (Missouri)

    President of the Senate: Robert A. Toombs (Georgia)
    Speaker of the House of Representatives: Robert M. T. Hunter (Virginia)
     
  2. Mac Gregor Well-Known Member

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    Great last update. I am interested to see how the war ends.
     
  3. Desmond Hume Amerikansky tovarishch

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    Just got caught up with this. It is a really great timeline, Ares!
     
  4. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Thank you both. As for how the war will end, wait and see… ;)
     
  5. CobiWann Well-Known Member

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    More! More! More! I love the mix between narrative and documentary!
     
  6. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    Whose the VP?
     
  7. manofsteelwool Well-Known Member

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    Don't you see Ares said VP doesn't exist now?
     
  8. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    I believe I stated that the Confederacy lacks a VP; it always struck me as one of the most unnecessary title in the US government. Toombs, as Senate President, is the closest equivalent they've got.

    EDIT: Ninja'd. Thanks, manofsteelwool.
     
  9. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Thank you. I can't claim credit for the style though - it's all sto… inspired by the Decades of Darkness.
     
  10. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    Looks back up at quoted post.

    huh?!

    How did i miss that?:confused::rolleyes:
     
  11. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Story of a Party - Chapter XI

    "What is essential in war is victory, not prolonged operations."
    - The Art of War, chapter II

    ***
    From "To Live and Die in Dixie" by Willie Pearson
    Duke University Press, 1946

    After the capture of Charleston, the Confederacy was in dire straits. Montgomery was safe from the Union advance, but then it and Florida, except for the area around Pensacola, were the only areas remaining in Confederate hands. President Quitman was frail and suffering from mental disease, but still clung on to power; very likely, the only thing that kept him from getting impeached was the threat of the Union armies.

    Most day-to-day governance was handled by Senate President Toombs and Secretary of State Rhett [1]. The simmering resentment between the two men and their standpoints now reached a boiling point, as the Confederacy was in its death throes. Toombs believed that they should surrender while there was still some wiggle room, and that the Northerners would start to dictate how the South should govern itself if their victory was complete, whereas Rhett believed that the only honourable thing to do was to go down fighting, and that this would earn them the respect of other countries. Toombs had the support of much of Congress, whereas Rhett was favoured by the President and much of his Cabinet.

    ***

    Confederate Executive Mansion
    Montgomery, Alabama, Confederacy of American States
    June 8, 1862

    Jefferson Davis, Confederate Senator from Mississippi and Secretary of War of the Confederacy [2], was sitting in the hallway outside the President's bedroom. Normally, he would be meeting with Quitman at his office; however, he had been afflicted by a rather bad stroke, which forced him to remain bed-ridden. Jefferson had been there when the stroke hit him; he had seen the President of the Confederacy rise out of his chair, caught in a frenzy of optimism over a new law conscripting the people of Montgomery County into Longstreet's army in a last ditch defence, which Davis believed undoable, only to collapse, his head landing in a ledger on the table, and his mouth spilling drool onto the population figures on the opened page. He had been there when the doctors arrived to take him to a military hospital, healthcare being confined to military purposes in there times of crisis, and when they returned with him on a stretcher in the back of the ambulance wagon. Jefferson had never quite agreed with his fellow Mississippian in terms of policy, especially since the President was much more hawkish toward the Union and kept pushing him to attack on all sides. However, President Quitman had still done much to aid Jefferson, and they had grown friendly with each others over the three years of the Confederacy's existence, sharing war stories over dinner on evenings in the Mansion and travelling to the front to make inspections together, and now they were John and Jefferson with each other. If the President should die now, he would miss him.

    Quitman's personal physician came out of his room. Jefferson rose out of his chair.

    "How bad is it?" he asked. The doctor looked at him with a disappointed face.

    "I'm afraid it's worse than we feared. The President has had another stroke, this one worse than the last. He died just five minutes ago. I heard his last words; they were 'I don't think we can win anymore. Tell Jefferson and Robert [3] to prepare our surrender.'"

    Jefferson swallowed. So it was true. The President was dead, and he wanted the Confederacy to stand down. This was a surprise, considering how Quitman had always wanted to fight until the very end. Perhaps not as much as Rhett did, but still.

    ***

    From "The Civil War" by Kenneth Burnside
    Illinois University Press, 1948

    "Quitman's death made Toombs president, but Rhett would not support his rule. As such, despite the Union armies near the capital, he walked out of government with his supporters, and fled, disguised as a courier, across the Union lines to St. Augustine, Florida, where he founded a rival Confederate government, with himself as President. He vowed to continue the struggle from there, and a small army was raised from among the then-small population of the Florida Peninsula.

    Toombs' government, however, went ahead with the surrender, honouring Quitman's last request. The surrender was accepted by McPherson on June 24, and the war was officially over.

    Sherman, who was the nearest major army commander, sent his II Corps, under the command of Irvin McDowell, to Florida to take care of Rhett's 'insurgent government'. The Army of Florida was defeated soundly in the Battle of Pumpkin Hill Creek on July 1, and Rhett was captured the day after. Without him at the helm, the Floridian state government surrendered, an event that took place on Independence Day of 1862, and ended all formal hostilities between the states. The Civil War was over, at least in name.

    ***

    [1] IOTL, Toombs was a moderate Unionist, who had opposed secession but followed his state into the Confederacy, and although moderate, he had a fiery temper and would never hesitate to use harsh language and harsh methods against his opponents and rivals. Rhett, on the other hand, had been one of the most hardline fire-eaters around before secession, and although he was a more calculating type, he could be extremely radical at times. It's largely the same ITTL, and perhaps unsurprisingly, these men do not get along.
    [2] The Confederate Constitution, taking inspiration from the Westminster system, allowed for a single person to hold both a Congressional seat and a Cabinet position at the same time.
    [3] Toombs, of course. By the Confederate laws, he is now the President. As a sidenote, Rhett preferred to be addressed by his middle name, Barnwell, rather then Robert, his first name.
     
  12. Kitiem3000 Donor

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    I'm curious as to what happens now. Guerrilla war? Are they going to screw up reconstruction? I can see no obvious paths for this to take.
     
  13. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Yes, in part. The situation is... messy, and it isn't helped by the fact that the people in charge tend to be Radical Republicans.
     
  14. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Story of a Party - Chapter XII

    "I wished that I were the owner of every southern slave, that I might cast off the shackles from their limbs, and witness the rapture which would excite them in the first dance of their freedom."
    - Thaddeus Stevens

    ***

    From "Death and Rebirth: A History of the South during Reconstruction" by Charles Wilcox
    Jefferson University Press, 1993

    "After the end of the Civil War, the South lay in ruins. The country had been starved by three years of Union blockades and the relentless march of armies upon the land; many plantation owners had found themselves overthrown by their own slaves, or very nearly so; for example, in Perry, Dallas and Lowndes Counties, all in Alabama's fertile Black Belt region, fully a third of the plantations had seen their owners overthrown and replaced by slaves, who had either divided the land between themselves or set up a new hierarchy with one man at the top, similar to the one that existed before the war. The occupying Union forces reacted differently to these changes; in some counties with radical commandants, the new order was tacitly accepted, and in others, the plantation owners were paid damages or even returned their properties, under the condition that they would pay the freedmen for their work and let them leave if and when they wanted to.



    On September 4, 1862, an act of Congress created the Freedmen's Bureau.*The Bureau's role was first and foremost to provide the basic requirements of living to refugee freedmen, but also to reunite families and to defend freedmen from being unfairly treated or sued by their former owners. The Bureau failed in many of its objectives; healthcare was severely deficient, many black men went their whole lives without finding out if their children were still alive, and the general misery of the freedmen went on.

    One thing the Freedmen's Bureau did do, however, was to make several improvements in the field of education. Before the war, no southern state had any widespread public education system to speak of. This, however, was changed in the reconstruction period, as local elementary schools, high schools, and public land-grant universities were set up all across the South. Despite that the Establishers [1] were against the public education system, and in some cases even campaigned against it, it was allowed to remain in place due to its popularity with poorer whites and freedmen."

    ***

    From "A Complete History of the United States Congress"
    Complied by the Library of Congress, 1955

    "1862 midterm elections

    The 1862 midterms, by and large, took place in the quiet after the storm. The Civil War was over, but the former Confederacy was still under military occupation, and so the elections were mainly taking place in the North. The Democratic performance was a low-water mark in that party's history, as without the support of the South, only twelve Representatives and four Senators were elected, most of them from Tennessee, Delaware and New Jersey. Almost all of the remaining Southern seats were taken by the Constitutional Union, making them the second biggest party in Congress. The rest of the states, however, were swept by the Republicans, who won all but a dozen seats in the free states."

    ***

    From "Deconstruction and Reconstruction: A History of the Postbellum United States, 1862-1924" by Walker Smith
    Abrams Publishing, Philadelphia, 1956

    "With the midterms over and their supermajority secured, the Republicans set about establishing their new order. They began by amending the Constitution four times, first to ban slavery everywhere in the Union, then to more closely demark the rights of all citizens, the method for counting population for representation in Congress, the extent of legal blocks against ex-Confederates and the extent of debt and reparation payments by the federal government [2], then to forbid secession, and finally to establish universal manhood suffrage, regardless of race."

    ***

    The Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was passed by the Texas Legislature on June 14, 1863, the twenty-third state legislature to do so, and ratified on June 26 of the same year.

    "Section 1. Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.

    Section 2. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

    ***

    From "Deconstruction and Reconstruction: A History of the Postbellum United States, 1862-1924" by Walker Smith
    Abrams Publishing, Philadelphia, 1956

    "The Thirteenth Amendment was a straightforward affair. Congress sat down to do what it had been expected to do since the start of the Civil War four years earlier, and more or less since Fremont's inauguration as President; namely, to put an end to slavery once and for all. The amendment was written in record time, and the state legislatures ratified it with haste, the border states knowing that this was what they had subjected themselves to when they had voted against secession. The amending process was completed in three months."

    ***

    The Fifteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was ratified by the Osage State Legislature [3]*on October 12, 1865, the twenty-fourth state legislature to do so, and was ratified on November 1 of the same year.

    "Section 1. All signatory parties to this Constitution acknowledge the United States of America to be a perpetual union, a sacrosanct covenant between states, and that no state, having taken upon itself the rights and responsibilities of any state in the Union, shall have the right to exclude itself from said union without the consent of three-fourths of both houses of Congress and three-fourths of the other states' legislatures.

    Section 2. Congress shall have the power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

    ***

    From "Deconstruction and Reconstruction: A History of the Postbellum United States, 1862-1924" by Walker Smith
    Abrams Publishing, Philadelphia, 1956

    "The Fifteenth Amendment may seem a strange deal to some. Why would the United States, the nation that had started on the premise of being a voluntary association, decide to make itself a rigid nation-state in this way? The reasons for this can be found by simply looking casually at the Civil War and its history. The conflict had been the bloodiest in American history up to that point, and it had accomplished very little on a grand scale. President Seward's [4] administration wanted assurance that nothing like this could happen again, and so did the Republicans in Congress. This amendment was, put simply, the best way of achieving that."

    ***

    The Sixteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was passed by the Tennessee General Assembly on April 22, 1866, the twenty-seventh state legislature to do so, and ratified on May 2 of the same year.

    "Section 1. All male citizens of the United States above the age of twenty-one, regardless of race, are eligible to vote in any election for President or Vice President, for electors for President or Vice President, or for Senator or Representative in Congress.

    Section 2. The right of said citizens to vote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state or municipal government based on race, colour, previous condition of servitude, or the failure to pay any tax levied by federal or state authority.

    Section 3. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation."

    ***

    From "Deconstruction and Reconstruction: A History of the Postbellum United States, 1862-1924" by Walker Smith
    Abrams Publishing, Philadelphia, 1956

    "The Sixteenth Amendment and the process leading up to its ratification was, in fact, more complicated than one might think at first. The original idea for the amendment was simpler, with a single section stating concisely that no citizen's right to vote was to be abridged based on "race, colour, or previous condition of servitude". However, some radicals in Congress, notably Charles Sumner, were unhappy with this version, fearing that Southern authorities would use poll taxes to disqualify freedmen from voting. When they threatened to abstain if their conditions were not fulfilled, the amendment was reworked to its current version." [5]

    ***

    [1] This term is used to refer to the same group of conservative Democrats that we term the Redeemers IOTL. The term stems from how these people favoured the "establishment", that meaning the unequal but peaceful state of things that existed before the Civil War.
    [2] The Fourteenth Amendment is exactly the same as IOTL. Therefore, I am skipping over it in this update.
    [3] Osage, along with Delaware, is one of only two border states to pass this amendment; even here, it was difficult enough to defeat the states' righters in the state government.
    [4] Yes, I did just give away the next President, and the result of the 1864 election with him. There was no mistake.
    [5] This is actually all OTL, except that IOTL, the amendment was not changed, and Sumner and the other radicals did abstain. Here, his influence is greater, and he manages to have the amendment reworked.

    ***

    Thoughts?
     
  15. Russian Sailor Taco man extrodanaire

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    Great update


    I wonder what will the southern reaction will be. Will there be a 40 acres and a mule act for both poor whites and blacks?
    :D
     
  16. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    [REDACTED]
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012
  17. manofsteelwool Well-Known Member

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    [2] The Fourteenth Amendment is exactly the same as IOTL. Therefore, I am skipping over it in this update.
     
  18. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    F*****HELL! That is the second time i have done this.

    Dammit!:mad:
     
  19. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Story of a Party - Chapter XIII

    "Whatever policy we adopt, there must be an energetic prosecution of it. For this purpose it must be somebody's business to pursue and direct it incessantly."
    - William Henry Seward

    ***

    The White House
    Washington, D. C.
    August 2, 1862

    President Fremont sat at his desk working, when his secretary arrived to announce a visitor.

    "Mr. President, Senators Hamlin and Sumner are here to see you."

    "Send them in."

    The three men had met each week for some time now, to plan out the reconstruction and readmission of the old Confederacy into the Union. They were all of the more radical side of the Republican Party, and so they agreed on what should be done most of the time. It had been agreed early on, for example, that the states should remain under occupation until they could be assured not to rebel again. The means for assuring this, however, were not quite clear, and Fremont expected that that was what Hamlin and Sumner wanted to clarify.

    "Good day, gentlemen," he said as they entered the room. "I understand you wanted to discuss something?"

    "Yes," said Hamlin. "Now that the war is over, we rather think that we should demarcate the means for bringing the Southern states back into the Union."

    Sumner started speaking. "We think, or I think, anyway, that half of the state officials, and three quarters of the ex-Confederates, are to have taken an oath not to rebel against the federal government again before the readmission progress can begin."

    "I agree," said Fremont. "It should be clear to them that if they want to be a part of the Union they can't try this kind of things anymore. In fact, I rather think there should be an amendment, if we get to that point, that keeps it more difficult for states to secede. This time it happened too quickly, and without Congressional support to boot…"

    "Indeed. However, firstly, I think we should devote our attention to restoring order in the South and emancipating all of the slaves. We have prepared a constitutional amendment to that effect, which we shall undertake to put before Congress to consider as soon as our current legislative actions are finished, which will be in a couple of months."

    "We must not forget," said Hamlin, "to protect the rights of the freedmen once they are, well, freed. The Southerners are liable to still treat them as slaves even when they aren't. To ensure that this won't be the case, we should definitely put forth another amendment to make sure they get the franchise…"

    "Agreed," said the other two men, almost in unison. Hamlin carried on.

    "… and perhaps a land reform, to make sure the freedmen won't have to be dependent upon the planters for land."

    "Hold on there." Fremont stopped him. "That will turn everyone in the South against us, except possibly the freedmen themselves. If we do such a thing, we should only take land from the planters who openly supported the Confederacy, as punishment for the rebellion. However, I'm not certain that even that will be quite necessary. The western territories offer ample land. Kansas, for example, is quiet enough these days, and only about a third of the land is settled. Perhaps we should pass an act making homesteads available to anyone, regardless of race, who settles the land?"

    "That's a good idea," said Sumner, "and I think the Freedmen's Bureau which we've discussed establishing can arrange cheap transport for the freedmen who want to resettle?"

    "It might," said Hamlin. "I'm sure there are many freedmen who will want to get away from the planters. I've heard they've gotten even more brutal after the slave revolts."

    "Splendid, then," said Fremont, "we are decided. There should be a Homestead Act, and that's what I want you to prioritise. I went into office promising free soil for free men, and that's what we're going to give them. As for the size of these homesteads, I think the standard 160 acres will do; that's more than enough to support a family."

    The three men exchanged the usual greetings, and the Senators left Fremont to do his work in peace.

    ***

    From "Deconstruction and Reconstruction: A History of the Postbellum United States, 1862-1924" by Walker Smith
    Abrams Publishing, Philadelphia, 1956

    "The Homestead Act was passed by Congress on December 14, 1862. Under it, anyone who had filed an application and then improved the land he lived on could then file for the title deeds to the land without having to buy it from the government. The idea behind the act was not only to settle the west faster, but also to provide new homes for freedmen and other war refugees. This latter idea proved somewhat unsuccessful, as not all the people wanted to leave their home areas and their extended families behind, and some of them wanted to move to the cities of the North to find industrial jobs instead (this, as you will all know, was before the Boll Weevil Infestation, and so the South still lacked even the beginnings of a native industrial economy [1]). In addition, many of the planters in the South still held considerable sway over their former slaves, many of whom retained the servile mindset that they had been brought up with, and could use various means to keep them from leaving. This was done by means such as sharecropping, which it was difficult to prevent in law, and was quite effective at keeping the freedmen economically dependent upon their former masters."

    ***

    From "Death and Rebirth: A History of the South during Reconstruction" by Charles Wilcox
    Jefferson University Press, 1993

    "By the summer of 1863, most of the planters had been returned their real property; at least, those who had managed to keep the title deeds to their plantations had. In some cases, however, the occupying forces had actually not allowed the planters to return, on the grounds that they had actively supported the Confederacy; this was usually the case, but sometimes the planter in question had just not actively resisted, which made it difficult to initiate a lawsuit.

    The plantations whose masters were turned out saw their land divided between the freedmen living on them, except in some rare cases where the plantation was kept around as a collective farm, owned jointly between all of the freedmen on it and managed by an elected president. On the plantations that were divided, there arose disputes between the freedmen over who should get what. Soon, an act of Congress, termed the Land Reform Act 1863, was passed to determine who should get what. The act guaranteed that "all such persons formerly held in servitude to such persons as have participated in rebellion against the lawful authority of the United States federal government, shall receive forty acres of land from the land previously held by the persons to whom they were indentured, with the rest of such persons' land to be distributed evenly among all parties."[2]. In effect, the act expropriated the Confederate supporters among the planters, and distributed the land between the former slaves. It did much to calm relations between various freedmen, but it only worsened the already strained relations between the freedmen and the planters that were still managing their own plantations. The poor whites of the South, who although having a bad lot in life were still in favour of "keeping the negro in his place", were also against the act, and in many places violence broke out between them and the freedmen, whom they saw as having stolen land from its rightful owners and gotten away with it because of "the nigger-lovin' bastards in Washington". The army had to be called in to cease these confrontations, which only led to the white groups attacking the army and the freedmen, and soon getting captured and detained b the army. As the right of habeas corpus was suspended in the occupied South, this meant that they could find themselves in jail cells for several months and then suddenly released with stern warnings not to repeat their mistakes.

    Indeed, these were dark times for democracy, and it was against this background that an election was held for the office of the Presidency…"

    ***

    From "A History of America Through its Presidents"
    John Bachmann & Son, Bluefields, Nicaragua, 1945

    "1864 presidential election

    The election of 1864 was marked by one singular event, with many other issues spreading out of it. This was the Civil War, and its recent ending. The principal issue was how to deal with the Southern states, now that the war was over. The Republicans favoured the continuation of the policies pursued under Fremont, such as taking away both land and voting rights from ex-Confederates, and even redrawing state boundaries to punish the former Confederate states. Initially, Vice President Lincoln was considered a likely candidate, but when Roger Taney died in April [3], Lincoln was selected by President Fremont to replace him as Chief Justice. Lincoln was accepted by the Senate and sworn in, and a new candidate needed to be found. Indeed, the radicals of the party soon found their man in William Henry Seward, the Secretary of State and a noted radical. Although there were concerns over his past policies, particularly his support for funding Catholic schools in New York during his time as governor there, his history as a strong abolitionist and a friend of the people carried him through to the nomination, which he won on the first ballot at the Convention in Albany. Hannibal Hamlin, the President pro tempore of the Senate [4], was chosen as his running mate.

    The Constitutional Union, who had originally had a very simple party program of reconciling the North and South and upholding constitutional rule of law, had had a chance to expand its ideology during its first few years in Congress. The party put forth a program of quick reconciliation between the North and South, "so that the nation may be whole once more". As for their nominations, several candidates held sway, including John Bell of Tennessee, their 1860 candidate; Sam Houston of Texas, Bell's running mate; Francis Preston Blair, Jr. of Osage, the Union Army general who had been instrumental to that state's countersecession from Missouri; Edward Everett of Massachusetts, a former Senator who had been a strong candidate for the nomination in 1860; and several others. However, two days into their national convention, the still immensely popular Robert E. Lee announced that he was a Constitutional Unionist, and was nominated by a unanimous convention on the fourth ballot. Blair was selected as his running mate, despite concerns that a Northern vice-presidential nomination might be useful to counterbalance the very Southern Lee.

    The Democrats, for their part, were disillusioned by their poor performance in the previous election, but hoped that a good candidate and sensible policies would help regain some of their voting base. They advocated a soft reconstruction as well, and the Democratic policies for dealing with Reconstruction were almost exactly the same as the Constitutional Unionist ones. However, the economic policies of the two parties were different. The Democrats favoured the status quo for the South, preserving the unique way of life in the former Confederacy, and as a rule vehemently opposed tariffs on foreign trade. The Democratic nomination, although hotly contested, was eventually secured by Senator Thomas A. Hendricks of Indiana, with George H. Pendleton of Ohio as his running mate. [5]

    The campaigning was intense; however, the South was largely ignored by all three major candidates, since the southern states did not vote in the election. The Republicans ran their campaign on the slogan "Peace for our time", and it was not uncommon for Republican-aligned newspapers to portray Hendricks and Lee as copperheads and doughfaces who wanted to set the South completely free and start the Civil War all over again.

    The Democrats and the Constitutional Unionists, on the other hand, were convinced that electing Seward would mean the complete ransacking of the South, and that his approach to reconstruction had grown beyond punishing the South and turned into a crusade to destroy it politically and economically. The image of Seward and Hamlin as vultures swooping down on the corpse of a planter was common during the campaign, and similar imagery has become a staple of political cartoons.

    Lee, for his part, did not make much campaigning of his own, instead running a traditional "front porch campaign"; this was rather successful, since the Lee family estate was located only a few miles away from Washington, D. C. His party hoped that his celebrity and success in the war alone would carry him into office.

    The election was a relatively close race considering that most of the South (all of the former Confederacy except Vandalia and Osage) was still under military occupation, and the Republican North and West dominated the electoral college. Had the South voted in the election, it is likely that General Lee would have won office, leading to a vastly different Reconstruction. However, with this not being the case, the policies of the Constitutional Union meant that Lee was an unappealing choice to most of those Northerners who wanted to punish the South for the war. Seward was promising that very thing, and this was what won him the election.

    Lee carried Vandalia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Osage, Texas and New Jersey, and Hendricks carried Indiana, Illinois, Maryland and Delaware. Seward won all other states.

    Results
    Secretary of State William Henry Seward (R-NY) / Senator Hannibal Hamlin (R-ME): 149 EV
    General Robert E. Lee (CU-VD) / Governor Francis Preston Blair, Jr. (CU-OE): 44 EV
    Senator Thomas A. Hendricks (D-IN) / Former Congressman George H. Pendleton (D-OH): 39 EV"

    ***

    [1] Hint hint…
    [2] IOTL, Sherman set aside land for the freedmen in southeastern Georgia, and arranged for it to be divided up in a similar fashion. After the war, similar measures were proposed by the Radicals, but were either written off as too radical or vetoed by President Johnson. ITTL, however, with the slave revolts already having started the job and there being fighting over it, the act is seen as a less drastic step.
    [3] This is earlier than he died IOTL. Why? Because he was more than eighty years old at this point, and because seven years of Republican rule, with all the hatred felt toward him for Dred Scott and others, is more of a strain on him than three years would have been.
    [4] ITTL, Hamlin remained a Senator instead of standing for the gubernatorial election in Maine. This means that he has served continuously since 1848, making him the most senior Senator of the Republican party (even though he was obviously not a Republican from the beginning).
    [5] So, why not Seymour? Well, he actually declined the nomination over and over in 1868 IOTL, and even when the entire convention started shouting that he was the only one they'd accept, he still adamantly refused. Only when he had left the room did the convention nominate him unanimously wihout his knowing, forcing him to give in.

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    Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2012
  20. Russian Sailor Taco man extrodanaire

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2010
    Location:
    the U.S
    Well I guess there is a 3 party system I can't wait to see what happens when economics come into play.

    Wouldn't republicans in a way to get support from poor southern whites might also try to distribute land to poor whites also?
     
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