The Story of a Party 2.0

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Utgard96, Nov 29, 2011.

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  1. wolf_brother Banned

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    John Quitman could be an interesting choice.

    Good update, I'm looking forward to more.
     
  2. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    You're making a very good point; however, the Confederacy has its capital in Montgomery, and their first priority will be defending it. However, I can see Georgia being attacked and conquered by Lee fairly easily. That is, unless the Confederates manage to go on the offensive…

    It might have been a bit hawkish, but he was really only doing it to provoke Fremont into declaring war first. The demand of popular sovereignty is for all intents and purposes equally outrageous, given who Fremont really is and why he was elected.

    See above.

    Well, Sam Houston's greater influence on the Convention would likely lead to staying in the Union; he was a famed Unionist, and actually resigned and went rogue as soon as Texas seceded. As for Lee, I think he figured he had greater chances of promotion in the Union Army, and also that he could save Virginia by fighting the Confederacy (which is just simply less Virginian and more Deep-Southern ITTL).

    That might be interesting; seeing as how he was a devoted Fire-Eater, as opposed to Davis, who was a cooperationist, he might be more the type of person to make such hawkish demands against the Union. I think Stephens would still make a good Vice President, though.
     
  3. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    Cabinet wise, some suggestions.

    William Barkesdale - pro-slavery, pro-secessionist, but from Tennessee. He was a rather vocal fire-eater.
    Robert Rhett could also possibly be in the cabinet as well.
    Have you ever thought of this guy, especially considering that the POD is before his death, not by much, but close.
    John Bell, could also be in the cabinet, but that would depend on whether an earlier Civil War is enough to distort his views. In relation to that, would the politicians/people who supported the Constitutional Union Party have a different POV with regard to this war? Especially with regards to the Southern Unionists?
     
  4. wolf_brother Banned

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    Considering the rebels ITTL are mostly Deep Southerners, with the capitol in Montgomery of all places, I doubt you'd see someone like Davis, or even Stphens, at the helm of the Confederacy. Quitman is a good bet IMHO, being a Deep Southern, a fire-eater, and above all just his personality, but if you want other options I'd also suggest looking at John C. Breckinridge, Herschel V. Johnson, Linn Boyd, Trusten Polk, or Robert M. T. Hunter.
     
  5. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Well, since Barksdale was from Tennessee, and served as a brigadier under Longstreet IOTL, I could see him becoming "TTL's Breckinridge", commanding an "Orphan Brigade" of sorts a bit into the Civil War.

    Rhett might be Attorney General; he served as South Carolina's Attorney General, after all.

    I've thought quite a bit about Brooks, actually, but I don't think his fate will be greatly different from OTL.

    I think Bell would stay with the Union; he might actually play a role in Tennessee's decision against secession. As for the Constitutional Union, I'm not even sure it would form in the same way as IOTL, or with that name. TTL's version will probably more prominently support a new compromise on slavery, as such a thing might bring the Confederate states back into the Union. John J. Crittenden might play a larger part in the party, as a result.

    Is Montgomery really such an odd place to put the capital? That was where the C.S. government was centred until Virginia seceded IOTL, after all. And I'd think Stephens could fit in; he was, after all, very pro-slavery, and an excellent lawyer. It is true that he was a cooperationist, and Quitman might not accept him as his VP, but I do think he would hold some important position in the C. S. government.

    Indeed, I'm pretty much settled on Quitman. It's true that IOTL he was two years dead by now, but he did die from the National Hotel epidemic, which he reportedly caught during his visit to Washington for Buchanan's inauguration. He would probably boycott Fremont's inauguration (being the Fire-Eater he was), leading to him surviving longer.

    I should think, actually, that William L. Yancey would make quite a good VP, being another prominent Fire-Eater, and passionately in favour of slavery. Johnson might also do well if they want a less radical candidate, being in favour of popular sovereignty, but I should think that if Stephens and Davis are to be excluded, then so is he.

    Both Breckinridge and Boyd were Kentuckians, and as such are going to have a hard time even getting into the C. S., what with the battle lines in Tennessee. Polk, however, might become Governor of Missouri once again, and play a role in the (unsuccessful; that much I can tell you now, and you shouldn't be very surprised) defence of the state.

    Hunter would probably hold similar roles in the Confederate administration as IOTL, but perhaps serving as Secretary of State for longer.
     
  6. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    OK, so here it is. Now, go easy on me if this is completely nonsensical; I know vastly more about the 1850s than the actual war, and I suck at writing campaign descriptions.

    ***

    Story of a Party - Chapter IV

    "…that this nation, under God, shall have a new birth of freedom—and that government of the people, by the people, for the people, shall not perish from the earth."
    - Abraham Lincoln

    ***

    From "To Live and Die in Dixie" by Willie Pearson
    Duke University Press, 1946

    "As now-General Lee was establishing himself in Chattanooga, General P.G.T. Beauregard, commanding the Confederate Army of Georgia, stationed in the important railway hub of Atlanta, was making plans of his own to attack the city and rout Lee. The plan called for nearly the whole army to move out and across the state border, and to pursue Lee should he abandon position and seek a strategic retreat. The plan was put into effect on May 19, as Beauregard led 21,000 men, nearly all infantry, out of Atlanta.

    On May 21, a firefight broke out between one of Lee's scouting patrols and the Confederate vanguard, and soon both armies found themselves in pitched battle. Lee decided to use the hilly terrain to his advantage by blocking off mountain passes and enclosing Beauregard in one area, cutting the Confederates off from both retreat and supply, and utilising his superior numbers to beat Beauregard in battle. This strategy failed, as Beauregard foresaw it and decided to attack one of the guarded mountain passes, which was only lightly defended. This forced Lee to pursue, and led to battle erupting again just north of the city, by the Tennessee River.

    The Battle of Chattanooga ended up a Confederate victory, to the surprise of everyone. Lee was forced to retreat northwest, in the direction of Nashville…"

    ***

    From "The Great Pathfinder" by Abraham Richardson
    Yale University Press, 1954

    "Chapter 8: The War Leader

    As the Confederates occupied Chattanooga and the surrounding hills, President Fremont found himself fighting a losing war. House Majority Leader Nathanael Banks resigned his position on June 3, offering his services to the Union Army. He was given command of the Army of the Potomac, which was to invade and occupy Northern Virginia, and later strike for Richmond.

    Banks was sent away from Washington, commanding a force of 16,000 fresh recruits. He initially met with success, crossing the Potomac on June 3, and occupying Woodbridge within a week, almost unopposed. This, however, was only due to the late arrival of Confederate forces, led by Joseph Johnston. Johnston attacked Banks when he attempted to cross the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg, on June 11. Since Banks' forces were unprepared for open battle (this was, more than anything, due to his own, and Lieutenant-General Scott's, belief that the area could be quickly secured before the Confederates counterattacked, at which time reinforcements could be sent over), even the cautious Johnston managed to successfully rout the Army of the Potomac, sending them retreating back north.

    Banks returned to the capital on June 25, and was met with coldness bordering on hatred by Federal officials. President Fremont was particularly displeased by Banks' defeat, and offered him his House seat (not the majority leadership, however) back, in what was in practice an honourable discharge from the Army. Banks reluctantly accepted, knowing that refusing would mean that the President would force his hand, and was replaced as commander of the Army of the Potomac by Fremont's old ally, Henry Wager Halleck.

    Halleck was a scholarly type of man, and a renowned strategic expert, but was not the most skilled battlefield commander. He did, however, have a great skill for organisation, and he was, in the words of one of his contemporaries, "not the type of man who inspired love, confidence or respect".

    After being installed, Halleck set tirelessly to work bringing order out of the chaos that Banks' retreat had caused. 7,000 new recruits arrived, making a grand total of 23,000 men in the army. With this force, Halleck crossed the Potomac once again on July 29. Johnston moved to oppose him, and on August 3, battle broke out near Chantilly. This battle was a close victory for Halleck, with around 3,000 dead on either side. He advanced to the Rappahannock; he did not move further afield, due to his own belief in defensive strategy, to defend and consolidate the already considerable gains made."

    ***

    From "The Marble Man: The Life of Robert E. Lee" by Henry Custis Lee
    Ingersoll Press, New York City, 1971

    "After his defeat at Chattanooga, Lee spent several disgraceful weeks retreating across the rolling hills of Tennessee, reaching as far as Manchester by Independence Day. There, he decided to counterattack, prompting what is known in history as the First Battle of Normandy Field. His army had almost recovered its organisation by then, despite the constant movements, and he was confident that he could beat Beauregard to a retreat, perhaps even sending him in flight back across the Tennessee. Beauregard, however, was prepared for the notion of Lee counterattacking, and the terrain was in his favour. When the armies met, Lee suffered yet another defeat, and was forced to retreat even further.

    Opinion in Washington was now firmly against Lee, and several suggestions were made by newspapers to remove him from his command. President Fremont, and especially Lieutenant-General Scott, were firmly against this, with Scott stating "Major-General Lee is the finest soldier I have ever seen in action, and the day he is removed is the day I resign." Scott is generally credited as the only thing that stood between Lee and a dishonourable discharge at the time."

    ***

    From "Sam Houston: The Man and the Legend" by Andrew Sanchez
    University of Texas Press, 1962

    "The state of Texas played a vital role to the Union's strategy in the Civil War. The newly formed Army of Texas, under Albert Sidney Johnston, was to strike east, into Louisiana, until reaching the Mississippi River, cutting off Confederate shipping and placing that river under Union control. From there, they were to move north, meeting up with the Army of the Ohio in Northern Mississippi.

    This strategy, however, failed to work initially. Confederate general Wade Hampton III, a rich planter and landowner, and his Army of the Atchafalaya, were poised on the river of that name, waiting for the Union attack. As such, Johnston managed to advance fairly far into Louisiana, capturing most of the Acadiana region, but was beaten back at the Battle of Breaux Bridge. His army managed to prevent the Confederates from chasing them beyond Lafayette, however, and took up defensive positions around that city.

    Further north, Union operations went with more success. The Indian Territory was divided by the war, with the Creeks and the Seminoles supporting the Union, but the other three civilised tribes (the Cherokees, the Chickasaws and the Choctaws) supporting the Confederacy. The tribes soon began waging wars on one another, supported by the sale of arms to both sides. It did not take long before the Union and the Confederacy both intervened directly, with both the Army of the Arkansas and the Army of Texas sending troops into the area. The Union army moved north from Fort Worth, entering Chickasaw-held territory in late June. On Independence Day, they met up with the Seminoles, and moved east with them, defeating the Chickasaws in battle near the Canadian River.

    This defeat incited nearly all the principal Chickasaw chiefs to defect and join the Union, opening up a corridor of Union-aligned land separating most Cherokee lands from the rest of the Territory. This was taken advantage of, and both the Apaches and the western Cherokees were similarly routed before the end of summer. By then, the Confederate Army of Arkansas, under Braxton Bragg, had sent in a whole regiment of men to defeat the Creeks. The Union troops turned east to meet them, only to be defeated. At the second attempt, however, they had the aid of the Seminoles and the Creeks, and managed to win a narrow victory over the Confederates. Now, they marched further east, into Arkansas and the southern Ozarks, to meet up with Major-General Grant's Army of the Missouri coming south…"

    ***

    From "An Officer and Gentleman: The Life of Ulysses S. Grant" by Clifford Stevens
    Jaguar Books, 1972

    "After the secession of Missouri, Grant was appointed commander of the Army of the Missouri, stationed in Jacksonville, Illinois, with orders to cross the Mississippi as soon as possible, capture St. Louis and Jefferson City, and later to move south to meet up with Johnston's forces in Louisiana.

    Grant decided to cross the Mississippi at a less conspicuous location than St. Louis, to avoid immediate confrontation with the Confederate troops across the river. He eventually settled on Hannibal, deciding to march from that city toward St. Louis. The crossing was carried out on June 6, and the Union Army was in occupation of Marion, Ralls and Pike counties within a week. The Army of the Missouri now moved south, reaching St. Charles by mid-July. There, the state militia, acting on orders from Governor Polk [1], engaged Grant in a battle, which he won. Now, the Army of the Missouri split in two, one, commanded by Ambrose Burnside, advancing up said river to capture Jefferson City and force a reversal of the Missouri Ordinance of Secession, and one, commanded by Grant personally, advancing with support of a few primitive gunboats of the Union Navy's Mississippi Squadron [2] down the Mississippi River to recapture Memphis from Samuel Cooper's Army of the Mississippi.

    Burnside's task was the hardest, since the state militia retreated up the Missouri to defend Jefferson City. He reached the state capital on August 8, and immediately ordered his men to open fire on the Confederate positions. The Battle of Jefferson City lasted for two full days, but in the end Burnside's troops won out, largely because of the better equipment (the Liberty Arsenal, Missouri's principal arsenal, having been raided by Union forces as early as in April) they possessed. The State Capitol was stormed at noon on the 9th, and the state government was declared abolished for the duration of the war. Burnside installed himself as military governor, with the approval of General Scott.

    Grant had a considerably easier time, his forces originally being largely unopposed. He had managed to reach Cape Girardeau by the time Burnside had defeated the state government, and he had reached Cairo, Illinois before the Confederates attacked. It was Bragg, and not Cooper, who first attacked Grant, in the Battle of Wickliffe, on September 3. There, Grant won a victory, despite heaving only 19,000 men to counter Bragg's 24,000. This enabled him to push Bragg further south, across the Kentucky-Tennessee state line, and then back across the Mississippi into Arkansas."

    ***

    From "Samuel Clemens: The Life of a True American Hero" by David Isaacs
    Brown University Press, 1943

    "When Generals Grant and Burnside entered Hannibal, Missouri, with their troops, Clemens was home on leave after the shipping company that had employed him as a pilot had gone out of business, as a result of he Civil War. He visited Grant's speech in the town, made just before leaving. That moment is largely accepted as the occasion on which Clemens finally decided to join the Union armed forces [3].

    He signed up for the Navy the day after, leaving Hannibal on the 13th, and arrived in Cairo, Illinois, the temporary base of the Mississippi Squadron, on the 29th. He was assigned to the gunboat USS Abilene, named for the city at northern end of the Chisholm Trail, and got along well with Commander Jacobs, his commanding officer. He later said that these days were "the happiest of that horrible war", and of Jacobs that "he was the finest officer and the most distinguished leader I have ever served under".

    His first combat role was in the Battle of Wickliffe, where the Abilene was among the ships providing fire support to Grant's forces, which proved the decisive factor of that battle. Here, Clemens manned the rear gun with distinction, which earned him petty officer's rank on the 7th, by Jacobs' personal recommendation. He now began manning the bridge, as the gunboats started filling a more mobile support role, and here the skill with which Clemens had piloted steamers for a living paid off. He was promoted to the rank of chief petty officer in October, and in February of 1861 he would become an ensign, serving as the helmsman of the Abilene."

    ***

    From "To Live and Die in Dixie" by Willie Pearson
    Duke University Press, 1948

    "By October of 1860, the Confederacy found itself in an exposed position, although not significantly weakened compared to its position upon secession. Indeed, Beauregard's and Cooper's efforts in Tennessee had probably saved the Confederacy from being split in two, and Hampton, for all his military inexperience, had done an admirable job at keeping Albert Sidney Johnston away from New Orleans, but in Virginia, Halleck was building up an impenetrable wall of Union troops and fortifications along the Rappahannock, which Joseph Johnston's Army of Northern Virginia would have difficulty breaking through.

    William Sherman was also beginning to show his worth in these days, as his troops in the Army of Appalachia had seized Charleston, where a convention was being held to discuss the counter-secession of the western Virginian counties. Missouri was effectively lost to Burnside's army, and Grant was harassing General Cooper's position in Memphis.

    In summary, secession had proved a harder thing than any "fire-eater" of the 1850s had ever imagined, and the Confederacy needed a victory in either Virginia or Tennessee to keep it from disintegrating. That came in November…"

    ***

    From "A History of the United States through its Presidents"
    John Bachmann & Son, Bluefields, Nicaragua, 1948

    "1860 presidential election

    The 1860 presidential election was radically changed from all of the earlier elections. Ten states had seceded, and although Missouri had been recovered two months previously, that state was under military occupation, and hence did not vote.

    Secession virtually destroyed the Democratic Party, who would probably have split as violently as the Whigs before them had the southern states waited longer with seceding. Instead, it quietly petered out as a political movement, the credibility of its policies on slavery (i. e. that the Union could still be saved through making suitable compromises) having been effectively destroyed first by secession, and then by the Republican campaign machinations. This was the last presidential election where a Democrat stood as a major candidate.

    The Democratic convention chose Senator Stephen A. Douglas for the presidency, with Governor Andrew Johnson of Tennessee as his running mate.

    The Republicans unanimously renominated Fremont for the presidency, but did not back Dayton for Vice President, instead successfully nominating Senator Abraham Lincoln of Illinois as Fremont's running mate.

    A new addition to the electoral mix was the Constitutional Union Party, founded by Senator John Bell of Tennessee, and including most Southern Unionists. Bell was nominated for the presidency with little opposition, and Governor Samuel Houston of Texas was chosen as his running mate.

    The election race proved more hard-fought than anyone would figure. Fremont, of course, ran on a platform based around the war effort, promising to put the war to an end before the end of his second term.

    Douglas, and especially Bell, however, both opposed the war, believing that secession was a right under the Constitution, and that although keeping the Union together was of course preferable, it was a compact between free and sovereign states, and if a state felt its interests were not guarded properly, it had a right to leave.

    To this, Fremont and Lincoln replied, in glowing sentences, that the secession of the Confederacy was illegal, since it took place without the consent of Congress, and was in defence of nothing except barbarism and uncivilised practice. They painted the war as a crusade against slavery, "this greatest of mankind's evils", and pledged to continue with this viewpoint for the rest of their terms.

    The Republicans ended up winning the election, with all the free states, except New Jersey and Indiana (which both voted for Douglas) voting for Fremont. Both Texas, Tennessee, Kentucky and Maryland, however, voted for Bell, and Delaware also voted for Douglas. In the congressional elections, the Republicans retained a safe majority in both houses.

    Overall, the biggest losers of the election were the Democrats, who lost nine Senators and twenty-seven Representatives, mainly to the Constitutional Union Party, but also to the Republicans."

    ***

    [1] Yes, Trusten Polk. I put him in this position because it seemed most logical.

    [2] Mainly old river steamships converted for wartime use by the removal of most upper decks and the instalment of outdated pieces of naval artillery.

    [3] As IOTL, Clemens was quite an opportunistic youth, and without his stint as a silver miner in Nevada, I imagine he might have joined the military to make some use of his skills and interests. As to why he joined the Union, he believed staunchly IOTL that abolition was just and fair, and ITTL many Missourians are skeptic to their state's decision to secede.

    ***

    Thoughts?

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2011
  7. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    No comments?
     
  8. Unknown Member

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    Good so far, Ares96.

    Looks like Tennessee will be heavily damaged post-war.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2011
  9. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    It will be, for all intents and purposes, TTL's Virginia. It will be heavily damaged, but it will bounce back, and by the present day it will not be much less developed than most other states.
     
  10. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    All the notable villains and heroes of the civil war have made their opening moves. The only one i didn't see was McClellan. The Democrats position was strange, in the election, no wonder they lost senators/congressmen.
    Anyway, ASJ in Blue?:eek: Samuel Clemens;) in Blue, and in the Navy. Set to become a hero methinks?
    Looking good Ares. Looking good.
     
  11. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Well, McClellan is kind of passed up by Fremont and Scott in favour of their allies, Lee, Grant and Halleck. He will be appearing soon, however.

    IMO this is what would likely happen if secession took place just before an election. The Democrats simply have no credibility now that compromising with the South has failed. Certainly noone in the North will want to establish a compromise on slavery after victory.

    What this does to the Radical Republican position, I probably don't even need to state. ;)

    He was a Texan patriot, and opposed secession. Since both Houston and Texas stayed in the Union, I see no reason for him to defect. Admittedly the same (but in reverse order) could be argued for Lee, I'm not doing two of these shifts: one is ASB enough.

    A thought: Johnston could be pitted against Beauregard in battle somewhere in Tennessee, later on in the war.

    You've got it right. The idea struck me that Clemens might stay in the piloting business for a couple of months longer ITTL, and when I looked at the map and saw that Hannibal would be the best place for a crossing north of Saint Louis, inspiration kind of struck. As for his future, you will have to wait and see...

    Thank you.
     
  12. Cathcon1 Feudalist Party Founder

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    Continue!!
     
  13. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Update time!

    ***

    Story of a Party - Chapter V

    "Generals may win campaigns, but people win wars."
    - Donald Porter

    ***

    From "The Marble Man: The Life of Robert E. Lee" by Henry Custis Lee
    Ingersoll Press, New York City, 1971

    "As 1860 turned into 1861, General Lee was taking up defensive positions around Nashville, believing that Beauregard would inevitably strike against the city, and that its loss could well cost Lee his command and the campaign. He held a speech to a new regiment of volunteers on January 9, clearly showing his intents:

    "My fellow soldiers, I am proud to see that you have all decided to get in line and fight for the Union. Now, I am well aware that this war is unlike any we have ever fought, in that it is a war between brothers, and that you may even be forced to fight your own family members. Being a son of Virginia, I am also aware of the pain caused by being forced to see what one used to call home now being a battlefield.

    Despite this, however, our resolution must not falter. If we fight bravely now, maybe soon this terrible war will be over, and we can call one another brothers again."

    These sentences show that, despite the unsuccessfulness which had plagued his campaign up until then, Lee had not lost his will to fight either. He was determined to beat Beauregard back, whatever the cost.

    Battle did indeed break out on the 15th, and Lee managed, finally, to beat Beauregard back. After this battle, Lee could move his positions constantly forward behind the retreating Confederate positions. He ordered his army to take defensive positions just north of Chattanooga, in preparation for a new offensive aimed at capturing that city and eventually also Atlanta, a railroad hub through which most of the South's cargo went. Such a move would, in effect, split the Confederacy in two, open the way to the sea and bring the war within measurable distance of its end [1]. However, Lee's army had suffered considerable casualties between Chattanooga, First Normandy Fields, Nashville, and the dispersed hill fighting in between, and even with enough new recruits to bring all regiments to full strength, Lee was concerned that his offensive would still suffer too high casualties. It was therefore that he sent a letter to President Fremont, asking for new recruits and outlining his offensive plan."

    ***

    From "The Civil War" by Kenneth Burnside
    University of Illinois Press, 1948

    "Fremont received Lee's letter on the 24th of February, and spent the next few weeks considering the offensive plan. After consulting with General Scott, he decided to send down a second army, recruited from the Ohio and Indiana state militias, bolstered with fresh volunteers from those states, and commanded by George B. McClellan. This army was named the Army of the Ohio, and before April was to an end, McClellan found himself commanding 17,000 men, a force nearly equal to Lee's. He moved south from Cincinnati on May 5th, reaching Lee's position on the 21st. There, the two men discussed strategy, and found themselves in disagreement; while Lee believed in quick offensive action to capture cities and secure victory as quickly as possible, McClellan was a more cautious type, who believed that gains made should be fortified and consolidated to avoid the enemy recapturing it.

    They quickly overcame their disagreements, however, and agreed to mount a joint attack on Chattanooga as soon as possible in order to secure their position before the main offensive.

    That battle broke out on the 5th of June, and Beauregard found himself quickly overwhelmed by the numerically superior Union forces. Chattanooga was back in Union hands, and Lee's offensive could finally take place."

    ***

    From "Dictionary of the Civil War"
    Baker Press, Langley, New Caledonia, 1937

    "ATLANTA CAMPAIGN: Offensive campaign fought by the Union Army of the Tennessee, under Robert E. Lee, and the Union Army of the Ohio, under George B. McClellan, against the Confederate Army of Georgia, under P. G. T. Beauregard. The offensive began on June 11, 1861, with Lee's men crossing the Tennessee at Chattanooga and pursuing Beauregard's army back into Georgia. The goal of the campaign, as alluded to by the name, was for Lee's men to capture the railroad hub of Atlanta, and then strike south-east against the state capital at Milledgeville, and at Savannah, one of the South's most important seaports. McClellan would then fortify Atlanta, capture nearby towns to avoid a Confederate counterattack, and prepare a new campaign aimed at Montgomery, the Confederate national capital. The capture of Montgomery would, coupled with the country being effectively split in two by the capture of Georgia, bring the war to an end, or so it was believed.

    Lee entered Atlanta on June 22, after engaging Beauregard in battle and defeating him first at Cassville and then at Kennesaw Mountain, both located northwest of the city. McClellan followed on the 25th, enabling Lee to move southward, which he did a few days later… [2]"

    ***

    From "The Marble Man: A Biography of Robert E. Lee" by Henry Custis Lee
    Ingersoll Press, New York City, 1971

    "As Lee left Atlanta, he faced battle almost immediately, as Beauregard sent his army to meet the offensive. The two armies met in battle outside Pantherville, a small city just east of the Atlanta city centre (these days it is at the edge of the Atlanta urban sprawl), on July 6. The battle is known in history as "Lee's Perfect Battle", since Lee managed to use his tactical genius to the fullest. Despite a numerical disadvantage, he successfully routed four brigades of Beauregard's army, taking over 5,000 prisoners, and casualty rates on the Union side were relatively low. Eventually, Beauregard had to retreat toward Milledgeville.

    The Battle of Panthersville brought Lee to national fame, and most of the people who had demanded him sacked after First Normandy Fields were now praising his efforts. President Fremont, in particular, was overjoyed that there was another Southerner [3] in the Union ranks who did not hesitate to fight for freedom's cause."

    ***

    From "The Great Pathfinder" by Abraham Richardson
    Yale University Press, 1954

    "After the Battle of Panthersville, the mood in the capital was a victorious one, and even then it was recognised that this was the perfect time to make the war political. To this end, Fremont issued a series of Presidential Proclamations, intended to bring forth the idea that the war was not only fought for the restoration of the Union, but also to bring freedom to the Union. The most famous one is the Emancipation Proclamation, which was released on July 15, and promised freedom to all "persons held in bondage and being residents of the ten states that are currently in rebellion against our Union". There was also, among others, the Fugitive Proclamation, which called for a repeal of the Fugitive Slave Act, and the introduction of measures to help refugees "of all races and colours" fleeing from life in the Confederacy.

    These proclamations soon found their way into the legislation of Congress, which did indeed vote in favour of repealing the Fugitive Slave Act on the 21st. The now-Northern-dominated Congress also took its chance to pass some legislation that had previously been stalled due to Northern-Southern divisiveness. Most prominent among there was the Transcontinental Railroad Act, which promised generous financial aid, in the form of government bonds, to any company willing and able to scout and build a railroad connecting the existing rail network with the Pacific Coast. The commission was accepted by the St. Joseph & Topeka Railroad Company in 1864, leading them to rename themselves the Union Pacific Railroad Company the year after…"

    ***

    From "To Live and Die in Dixie" by Willie Pearson
    Duke University Press, 1946

    "After Panthersville, Beauregard found himself on the run once again. Lee was pursuing him southward along the railway line toward Savannah, with the intent of pushing to the sea and splitting the Confederacy in two. Beauregard decided to act quickly, and asked President Quitman to send him reinforcements on July 15. Quitman sent Beauregard a whole corps worth of recruits, including the now-famous Thomas Jackson and his brigade. Jackson had featured prominently in Samuel Cooper's Memphis Campaign, with his steadfast attacking moves earning him the nickname "Ironfist". [4]

    "Ironfist" Jackson was promoted to Major General, and placed in command of the new IV Corps of the Army of Georgia, on July 18. However, despite of this, Lee managed to beat Beauregard back at Covington, and Beauregard decided to make a new counterattacking plan.

    By the new strategy, Lee's army would be allowed to penetrate quite far into Georgia with only token Confederate forces opposing him. Meanwhile, Beauregard was to attack him from the rear, leaving his army out of supply.

    This strategy would have worked well enough, if Lee had not anticipated it. The plan, codenamed Plan 187, was incautiously dropped by a Confederate courier, only to be found by a Union scouting patrol. When Lee received the plan, he decided to make his troops ready for the attack by posting most of them to the back of the marching formation. Furthermore, he informed McClellan, who prepared two of his five corps to strike Beauregard in the back, surrounding the Confederate formations.

    The battle broke out near the farm of Shady Dale, on the 26th, as Lee's forces prepared to strike across the woods toward Milledgeville. Beauregard had under his command 20,500 men, Lee 18,500.

    Initially the battle went poorly for Lee, as Beauregard's forces encircled his army and began fighting their way through the Union formations. McClellan arrived within a few hours, and struck the Confederates in the back. This turned the tide of the battle, and ensured the Union encirclement of the Army of Georgia, and the capture of Milledgeville a few days later."

    ***

    From "The Civil War" by Kenneth Burnside
    University of Illinois Press, 1948

    "As July of 1861 turned into August, Henry Halleck and the Army of the Potomac were still holding position along the Rappahannock River. By now, everyone was wondering why he still hadn't moved, and Halleck only offered his usual comment on how defences needed to be strengthened to ensure the area's safety and prevent it from falling into enemy hands. This only served to infuriate the Federal leadership further, with President Fremont writing in a letter to a friend:

    "I am starting to think that appointing Halleck was the largest mistake we have made so far in the war. It seems now, that sooner would the Autocrat of all the Russias abdicate his throne and proclaim his citizens as free republicans than Halleck will cross the Rappahannock into Confederate-held land." [5]

    However, Halleck's organisational skill was considerable, and so when Lieutenant-General Scott resigned his commission, willing to live out his days in peace [6], Halleck was offered his place and accepted. He was replaced in Virginia by William Tecumseh Sherman, the former commander of the Army of Appalachia, command of which, in turn, went to George Meade.

    Sherman immediately began forming plans for taking Richmond within the year. His forces numbered in at 35,800 men, the largest single army in the Union ranks [7], whereas Joseph Johnston had amassed 33,500 across the Rappahannock. Sherman crossed the river at Fredericksburg on August 20, and battle broke out almost at once.

    The battle started out well enough for Johnston, with J. E. B. Stuart's [8] cavalry brigade moving behind Union lines and cutting them off from retreat. This allowed Johnston to make full use of the panic in the Union ranks; however, Sherman quickly sent a corps of his army back, easily reestablishing a link from his bridgehead into Union-controlled land. Now the tide of battle turned, and Sherman eventually managed to defeat Johnston, sending his army retreating and taking several thousand men as prisoners.

    After the battle, Johnston set up defensive positions around Richmond, believing (as was the case) that a successful defence of the Virginian capital would be essential to the war effort."

    ***

    From "The Late State: A History of Vandalia" by Hiram Lansdowne
    Greeley Press, Charleston, 1985

    "At the time of Third Fredericksburg, a convention was held in Wheeling to discuss the countersecession of the western Virginia counties. The delegates to the convention agreed that the area would do better as a separate state from Virginia, since its society was much different from that of the rest of the state. They voted on secession, and with a sizeable majority, all the represented counties except for Monroe [9], Tazewell and Giles approved it [10].

    General Meade, who was present in Wheeling despite his army being further south, approved of the Convention's actions, and signed its adopted resolution. He sent a letter with the same Army courier who carried the resolution to Washington, asking Congress to admit Vandalia into the Union at once. This was done, and Vandalia was admitted as the Union's 34th state on September 12, 1861.

    However, the situation was complicated when the state's first governor, Arthur Boreman, moved the location of the capital to Alexandria, which, although located in the part of Virginia that had not seceded, was Union-controlled, and claimed control over all the Union-held parts of Virginia. This earned him the stern warnings of President Fremont, who insisted that he return to Vandalia and limit his claimed jurisdiction to that state. Boreman refused, and this caused a brief confrontation between the two men, until Fremont realised that he would need some form of government for Virginia once that state was returned to Union control. As such, Fremont allowed Boreman to go on as governor of both states until war's end."

    ***

    [1] With apologies to George Orwell.

    [2] I've tried to make this similar to the OTL Atlanta Campaign, as the situation is kind of similar. The fewer battles are because of the Union's numerical superiority; although Lee's force, being the vanguard, bore the brunt of the fighting, McClellan did play a part in the battles as well.

    [3] Although he ran for both Senate and the Presidency as a Californian, Fremont was born in Georgia, to a Virginian mother from a rich planter family, and considers himself a Southerner by birth.

    [4] IOTL, as everyone will know, Jackson's nickname was "Stonewall", coming from his brigade being one of few that didn't break and run during First Bull Run. ITTL, his career is different, and as such he gains a different nickname.

    [5] Lincoln wrote something similar IOTL (wish I could remember where I read it…)

    [6] Scott did resign in late 1861 IOTL as well; he was, after all, seventy-five years old by this point, weighing in at nearly 140 kg (300lbs.) and suffering badly from rheumatism and gout. He died not five years later IOTL, and I see no reason why this should be any different.

    [7] ITTL, the armies of the Civil War are rather smaller. This is mainly because the war has not been going on for very long, and no conscription has been launched by either side.

    [8] Too many Virginians have been moved back and forth across state lines in this war already. At least Stuart will be doing what he did IOTL.

    [9] This is OTL's Buchanan County. Since ITTL Buchanan humiliated himself in the campaign and lost the election, Virginia sees no reason to name the county after him, and instead chooses one of the greatest Virginian presidents.

    [10] This means that Vandalia includes all of OTL's West Virginia except for Morgan, Berkeley and Jefferson counties, but with Alleghany, Bath and Highland counties added.

    ***

    Thoughts?
     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2012
  14. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2010
    Location:
    AUS
    Lee and McClellan, fighting together, in Georgia. Sherman fighting Johnston, in Virginia. And Halleck, well, being Halleck.

    :eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek::eek:

    You sir, are making an awesome TL, and i hope this goes further than your previous V1. I look forward to more.
     
  15. Unknown Member

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    Corpus Christi, TX
    Ares96, I just nominated you for a Turtledove for Best New 19th Century timeline.

    This TL is all kinds of awesome, and the Civil War isn't over yet.
     
  16. Turquoise Blue Blossoming Tibby! Donor

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    Shoshone Territory, eh? Was you inspired by Union and Liberty which did the same?
     
  17. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

    Joined:
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    Up yonder
    I actually didn't even stop to think of the parallels with OTL until just now. Except for Halleck, that was all coincidental.

    Thank you very much. I will indeed try to continue. I've got everything up until about 1920 roughly sketched out.

    Well, actually it's supposed to go in Continuing 19th Century, since it's a remake of an old TL. Still, thank you very much - I hope people will vote for it!

    Indeed - as you can see, between Lee's "perfect battle", the Union inroads into Virginia and Georgia, the Emancipation Proclamation and the admission of *West Virginia, 1861 is basically TTL's 1863.

    Not only that; it was also because it actually makes sense as a name - more sense, indeed, than Idaho, which name no one knows the origin of. Shoshone is the name of an Indian tribe in the area, and an alternative name for the Snake River.
     
  18. Darth_Kiryan The Númenorean Sith

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    especially considering that Lee's perfect battles holds similarities to Antietam and Chancellorsville
     
  19. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

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    Mar 19, 2010
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    Up yonder
    That was a conscious decision on my part; the battle is supposed to be an analogue of both at once.
     
  20. Utgard96 basically a load of twaddle about freedom

    Joined:
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    Up yonder
    [​IMG]
     
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