OTL Election maps resources thread

Spot the difference

(Was working on a thing with the 1968 election, and the wikipedia map for that year seems to have a lot of errors, going off the results in the text and these district maps. The map below on the right is the one currently on the wiki, while the one on the left has corrections, though I'm not even sure I've corrected all the errors, at some point I may go back and comprehensively go over it, but I found something like 30 or so errors just editing the map for a thing without intentionally expecting to be making corrections)

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In retrospect, 2020 California Prop 24 was passed by a strange coalition.
In what appears to be a simple Democratic victory, it was opposed in San Francisco and Alpine County.
 
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From a Westerner's perspective, Japanese gubernatorial contests are very weird. For starters, even though (as I correctly assumed) the overwhelming majority of Japanese governors are aligned with the LDP, only twelve of the 47 prefectures have an actual LDP governor. A further ten are independents supported by the LDP, while ten are independents endorsed by both the LDP and the opposition parties who were basically just opposed by independents and/or the Communists.

Six more are independents elected with the support of the opposition (and with half of them I can guess why- Iwate and Saitama are the home of Ichirō Ozawa, the so-called 'Shadow Shogun' who was instrumental in the LDP losing the 1993 election and who has been a Diet member for over 50 years for various parties, and Yukio Edano, current Leader of the Opposition and of the Constitutional Democratic Party (CDP) respectively, while Okinawa has the ongoing conflict over the US's military presence which the pacifistic opposition parties can use to rally against the LDP), while five are independents without any major party's support and Tokyo and Osaka's governorships are controlled by the local Tomin First No Kai and Osaka Restoration Association parties. Finally, and most amusingly to me, the only national party besides the LDP to get a governor elected without just backing an independent is... drum roll... the SDP! Admittedly Masanori Tanimoto, governor of Ishikawa, was first elected back in 1994, back when the JSP was still a thing, and has been backed by the LDP and Komeito most of the time, but Wikipedia calls him a Social Democrat so I'm going with it.

That, however, brings me onto the weirdest part. I can't really find a consistent list- not just on Wikipedia, but really any English-language source online that I've found- of what party the governors are all from, if they're from a party, or even which parties they're endorsed by. (The only thing I can tell for certain is a grand total of none of them are Communists.) Admittedly that's understandable due to the lesser influence these elections have on Japan's unitary political system and the fractious nature of the opposition since 2016, but as a result, there's some asterisks on this map for where I'm uncertain about what party someone comes from or who backed them. For instance, Iwate's governor Takuya Tasso was elected for the Democratic Party for the People (DPFP), but since that's now folded and I can't find any info on whether Tasso has joined the CDP or the continuity DPFP or become an independent, he's just down as 'independent with opposition support'.

If anyone has any information to help with or correct this, feel free to share, obviously!
 
Notes on U.S. gubernatorial elections, 1851-1860

(Dark blue: Democratic hold. Light blue: Democratic gain.
Dark yellow: Whig hold. Light yellow: Whig gain.
Dark red: Republican hold. Light red: Republican gain.
Dark purple: Know Nothing hold. Light purple: Know Nothing gain.)

1851

Starting position: Dem 24, Whig 6, Ind 1.

Successions pre-election
California. 1851 Jan. J. McDougal (Ind Dem) succeeded P. Burnett (Ind Dem), resigned.
Mississippi. 1851 Feb. J. Guion (Dem) succeeded J. Quitman (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1851 Mar. No majority. Legislature re-elected S. Dinsmoor Jr. (Dem).
Connecticut. 1851 Apr. No majority. Legislature re-elected T. Seymour (Dem).
Rhode Island. 1851 Apr. P. Allen (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Alabama. 1851 Aug. H. Collier (Dem) re-elected.
Kentucky. 1851 Aug. L. Powell (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Tennessee. 1851 Aug. W. Campbell (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Texas. 1851 Aug. P. Bell (Dem) re-elected.
California. 1851 Sep. J. Bigler (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Ind.
Vermont. 1851 Sep. C. Williams (Whig) re-elected.
Georgia. 1851 Oct. H. Cobb (Const. Union †) elected. Const. Union gain from Dem.
Ohio. 1851 Oct. R. Wood (Dem) re-elected.
Pennsylvania. 1851 Oct. W. Bigler (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Massachusetts. 1851 Nov. No majority. Legislature re-elected G. Boutwell (Dem).
Michigan. 1851 Nov. R. McClelland (Dem) elected. Shortened term.
Mississippi. 1851 Nov. H. Foote (Union Dem) elected.
Wisconsin. 1851 Nov. L. Farwell (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Virginia. 1851 Dec. J. Johnson (Dem) elected.

† Some sources give Cobb as a 'Union Democratic' candidate.

Closing position: Dem 25, Whig 5, Ind 1.

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(Orange: Const. Union win - Georgia)

Successions post-election
Mississippi. 1851 Nov. J. Whitfield (Dem) succeeded J. Guion (Dem), term as Senate president expired. (Pre inauguration).

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1852

Starting position: Dem 25, Whig 5, Ind 1.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1852 Mar. N. Martin (Dem) elected.
Connecticut. 1852 Apr. T. Seymour (Dem) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1852 Apr. P. Allen (Dem) re-elected.
Arkansas. 1852 Aug. E. Conway (Dem) elected.
Missouri. 1852 Aug. S. Price (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1852 Aug. D. Reid (Dem) re-elected.
Maine. 1852 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected W. Crosby (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Vermont. 1852 Sep. E. Fairbanks (Whig) elected.
Florida. 1852 Oct. J. Broome (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Indiana. 1852 Oct. J. Wright (Dem) re-elected.
Illinois. 1852 Nov. J. Matteson (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1852 Nov. No majority. Legislature elected J. Clifford (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Michigan. 1852 Nov. R. McClelland (Dem) re-elected.
New York. 1852 Nov. H. Seymour (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
South Carolina. 1852 Dec. J. Manning (Dem) elected.
Louisiana. 1852 Dec. (Special) P. Hebert (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 25, Whig 5, Const. Union 1.

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1853

Starting position: Dem 25, Whig 5, Const. Union 1.

Successions pre-election
Michigan. 1853 Mar. A. Parsons (Dem) succeeded R. McClelland (Dem), resigned.
Ohio. 1853 Jul. W. Medill (Dem) succeeded R. Wood (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1853 Mar. N. Martin (Dem) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1853 Apr. T. Seymour (Dem) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1853 Apr. P. Allen (Dem) re-elected.
Alabama. 1853 Aug. J. Winston (Dem) elected.
Tennessee. 1853 Aug. A. Johnson (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Texas. 1853 Aug. E. Pease (Dem) elected.
California. 1853 Sep. J. Bigler (Dem) re-elected.
Maine. 1853 Sep. No majority. Legislature re-elected W. Crosby (Whig).
Vermont. 1853 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected J. Robinson (Dem). Dem gain from Whig.
Georgia. 1853 Oct. H. Johnson (States Rights-Dem) elected. Dem gain from Const. Union.
Ohio. 1853 Oct. W. Medill (Dem) elected in his own right.
Maryland. 1853 Nov. T. Ligon (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1853 Nov. No majority. Legislature elected E. Washburn (Whig).
Mississippi. 1853 Nov. J. McRae (Dem) elected.
New Jersey. 1853 Nov. R. Price (Dem) elected.
Wisconsin. 1853 Nov. W. Barstow (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.

Closing position: Dem 29, Whig 2.

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Successions post-election
Rhode Island. 1853 Jul. F. Dimond (Dem) succeeded P. Allen (Dem), resigned.
Connecticut. 1853 Oct. C. Pond (Dem) succeeded T. Seymour (Dem), resigned.
Texas. 1853 Nov. J. Henderson (Dem) succeeded P. Bell (Dem), resigned (Pre inauguration).
Mississippi. 1854 Jan. J. Pettus (Dem) succeeded H. Foote (Union Dem), resigned (Pre inauguration).

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1854

(The period from 1854 to 1857 was one of great fluidity, encompassing the fall of the Whig Party, the rise and fall of the American (Know Nothing) Party, and the rise of the Republican Party. Although party labels are usually fairly clear, candidates were often nominated on fusion tickets of two or more parties. Candidates have been given according to their primary party designation.)

Starting position: Dem 29, Whig 2.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1854 Mar. N. Baker (Dem) elected.
Connecticut. 1854 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected H. Dutton (Whig). Whig gain from Dem.
Rhode Island. 1854 Apr. W. Hoppin (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Iowa. 1854 Aug. J. Grimes (Whig †) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
North Carolina. 1854 Aug. T. Bragg (Dem) elected.
Maine. 1854 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected A. Morrill (Rep ‡). Rep gain from Whig.
Vermont. 1854 Sep. S. Royce (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Pennsylvania. 1854 Oct. J. Pollock (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
Delaware. 1854 Nov. P. Causey (American) elected. American gain from Dem.
Massachusetts. 1854 Nov. H. Gardner (American) elected. American gain from Whig.
Michigan. 1854 Nov. K. Bingham (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
New York. 1854 Nov. M. Clark (Whig) elected. Whig gain from Dem.
South Carolina. 1854 Dec. J. Adams (Dem) elected.

† Grimes was involved in the foundation of the Iowa Republican Party in 1856, but most sources record him as a Whig throughout his term. The 1857 result in Iowa is therefore given as a Republican gain rather than a hold.
‡ Some sources give Morrill as a Republican candidate in 1854, whereas others give him as a Know Nothing-Maine Law fusion candidate. He was defeated for re-election in 1855 as a Republican.

Closing position: Dem 21, Whig 6, American 2, Rep 2.

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Successions post-election
North Carolina. 1854 Dec. W. Winslow (Dem) succeeded D. Reid (Dem), resigned (Pre inauguration).

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1855

Starting position: Dem 21, Whig 6, American 2, Rep 2.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1855 Mar. R. Metcalf (American) elected. American gain from Dem.
Connecticut. 1855 Apr. No majority. Legislature elected W. Minor (American). American gain from Whig.
Rhode Island. 1855 Apr. W. Hoppin (Whig) re-elected.
Virginia. 1855 May. H. Wise (Dem) elected.
Alabama. 1855 Aug. J. Winston (Dem) re-elected.
Kentucky. 1855 Aug. C. Morehead (American) elected. American gain from Dem.
Tennessee. 1855 Aug. A. Johnson (Dem) re-elected.
Texas. 1855 Aug. E. Pease (Dem) re-elected.
California. 1855 Sep. J. Johnson (American) elected. American gain from Dem.
Maine. 1855 Sep. No majority. Legislature elected S. Wells (Dem). Dem gain from Rep.
Vermont. 1855 Sep. S. Royce (Whig) re-elected as Rep. Rep gain from Whig.
Georgia. 1855 Oct. H. Johnson (States Rights-Dem) re-elected as Dem.
Ohio. 1855 Oct. S. Chase (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
Louisiana. 1855 Nov. R. Wickcliffe (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1855 Nov. H. Gardner (American) re-elected.
Mississippi. 1855 Nov. J. McRae (Dem) re-elected.
Wisconsin. 1855 Nov. W. Barstow (Dem) re-elected in disputed election.

Closing position: Dem 18, American 6, Whig 4, Rep 3.

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1856

Starting position: Dem 18, American 6, Whig 4, Rep 3.

Successions pre-election
Wisconsin. 1856 Mar. A. MacArthur (Dem) succeeded W. Barstow (Dem), resigned.
Wisconsin. 1856 Mar. C. Bashford (Rep) declared winner of disputed election. Rep gain from Dem.

Starting position: Dem 17, American 6, Whig 4, Rep 4.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1856 Mar. No majority. Legislature re-elected R. Metcalf (American †).
Connecticut. 1856 Apr. No majority. Legislature re-elected W. Minor (American).
Rhode Island. 1856 Apr. W. Hoppin (Whig) re-elected as Rep. Rep gain from Whig.
Arkansas. 1856 Aug. E. Conway (Dem) re-elected.
Missouri. 1856 Aug. T. Polk (Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1856 Aug. T. Bragg (Dem) re-elected.
Maine. 1856 Sep. H. Hamlin (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
Vermont. 1856 Sep. R. Fletcher (Rep) elected.
Florida. 1856 Oct. M. Perry (Dem) elected.
Indiana. 1856 Oct. A. Willard (Dem) elected.
Illinois. 1856 Nov. W. Bissell (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
Massachusetts. 1856 Nov. H. Gardner (American ‡) re-elected.
Michigan. 1856 Nov. K. Bingham (Rep) re-elected.
New Jersey. 1856 Nov. W. Newell (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
New York. 1856 Nov. J. King (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Whig.
South Carolina. 1856 Dec. R. Allston (Dem) elected.

† Metcalf was not opposed by a Republican candidate and some sources suggest he was a Republican candidate in the 1856 election.
‡ Gardner was also supported by the Republicans. In return he supported John Fremont in the presidential election, and was opposed in the gubernatorial election by a 'Fillmore American' candidate.

Closing position: Dem 14, Rep 9, American 6, Whig 2.

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1857

Starting position: Dem 14, Rep 9, American 6, Whig 2.

Successions pre-election
Maine. 1857 Feb. J. Williams (Rep) succeeded H. Hamlin (Rep), resigned.
Missouri. 1857 Feb. (Special) H. Jackson (Dem) succeeded T. Polk (Dem), resigned.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1857 Mar. W. Haile (Rep) elected. Rep gain from American.
Connecticut. 1857 Apr. A. Holley (Rep) elected. Rep gain from American.
Rhode Island. 1857 Apr. E. Dyer (Rep) elected.
Alabama. 1857 Aug. A. Moore (Dem) elected.
Tennessee. 1857 Aug. I. Harris (Dem) elected.
Texas. 1857 Aug. H. Runnels (Dem) elected.
Missouri. 1857 Aug. R. Stewart (Dem) elected.
California. 1857 Sep. J. Weller (Dem) elected. Dem gain from American.
Maine. 1857 Sep. L. Morrill (Rep) elected.
Vermont. 1857 Sep. R. Fletcher (Rep) re-elected.
Georgia. 1857 Oct. J. Brown (Dem) elected.
Iowa. 1857 Oct. R. Lowe (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Whig.
Minnesota. 1857 Oct. H. Sibley (Dem) elected. Dem win (New state). (Minnesota not admitted until 1858 May).
Mississippi. 1857 Oct. W. McWillie (Dem) elected.
Ohio. 1857 Oct. S. Chase (Rep) re-elected.
Pennsylvania. 1857 Oct. W. Packer (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Whig.
Maryland. 1857 Nov. T. Hicks (American †) elected. American gain from Dem.
Massachusetts. 1857 Nov. N. Banks (Rep) elected. Rep gain from American.
Wisconsin. 1857 Nov. A. Randall (Rep) elected.

† Hicks became a Unionist around 1860.

Closing position: Dem 16, Rep 13, American 3.

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1858

Starting position: Dem 16, Rep 13, American 3.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1858 Mar. W. Haile (Rep) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1858 Apr. W. Buckingham (Rep) elected.
Rhode Island. 1858 Apr. E. Dyer (Rep) re-elected.
Oregon. 1858 Jun. J. Whiteaker (Dem) elected. Dem win (New state). (Oregon not admitted until 1859 Feb).
North Carolina. 1858 Aug. J. Ellis (Dem) elected.
Maine. 1858 Sep. L. Morrill (Rep) re-elected.
Vermont. 1858 Sep. H. Hall (Rep) elected.
Delaware. 1858 Nov. W. Burton (Dem) elected. Dem gain from American.
Massachusetts. 1858 Nov. N. Banks (Rep) re-elected.
Michigan. 1858 Nov. M. Wisner (Rep) elected.
New York. 1858 Nov. E. Morgan (Rep) elected.
South Carolina. 1858 Dec. W. Gist (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Dem 18, Rep 13, American 2.

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1859

Starting position: Dem 18, Rep 13, American 2.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1859 Mar. I. Goodwin (Rep) elected.
Connecticut. 1859 Apr. W. Buckingham (Rep) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1859 Apr. T. Turner (Rep) elected.
Virginia. 1859 May. J. Letcher (Dem) elected.
Alabama. 1859 Aug. A. Moore (Dem) re-elected.
Kentucky. 1859 Aug. B. Magoffin (Dem) elected. Dem gain from American.
Tennessee. 1859 Aug. I. Harris (Dem) re-elected.
Texas. 1859 Aug. S. Houston (Ind Dem) elected. Ind gain from Dem.
California. 1859 Sep. M. Latham (Lecompton Dem) elected.
Maine. 1859 Sep. L. Morrill (Rep) re-elected.
Vermont. 1859 Sep. H. Hall (Rep) re-elected.
Georgia. 1859 Oct. J. Brown (Dem) re-elected.
Iowa. 1859 Oct. S. Kirkwood (Rep) elected.
Mississippi. 1859 Oct. J. Pettus (Dem) elected.
Ohio. 1859 Oct. W. Dennison (Rep) elected.
Louisiana. 1859 Nov. T. Moore (Dem) elected.
Massachusetts. 1859 Nov. N. Banks (Rep) re-elected.
Minnesota. 1859 Nov. A. Ramsey (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
New Jersey. 1859 Nov. C. Olden (Rep) elected.
Wisconsin. 1859 Nov. A. Randall (Rep) re-elected.
Kansas. 1859 Dec. C. Robinson (Rep) elected. Rep win (New state). (Kansas not admitted until 1861 Jan).

Closing position: Dem 17, Rep 15, American 1, Ind 1.

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(Pale yellow: Ind win - Texas)

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1860

Starting position: Dem 17, Rep 15, American 1, Ind 1.

Successions pre-election
California. 1860 Jan. J. Downey (Dem) succeeded M. Latham (Dem), resigned.
Illinois. 1860 Mar. J. Wood (Rep) succeeded W. Bissell (Rep), deceased.
Indiana. 1860 Oct. A. Hammond (Dem) succeeded A. Willard (Dem), deceased.

Elections
New Hampshire. 1860 Mar. I. Goodwin (Rep) re-elected.
Connecticut. 1860 Apr. W. Buckingham (Rep) re-elected.
Rhode Island. 1860 Apr. W. Sprague (Dem) elected. Dem gain from Rep.
Arkansas. 1860 Aug. H. Rector (Ind Dem) elected. Ind gain from Dem.
Missouri. 1860 Aug. C. Jackson (Douglas Dem) elected.
North Carolina. 1860 Aug. J. Ellis (Dem) re-elected.
Maine. 1860 Sep. I. Washburn Jr. (Rep) elected.
Vermont. 1860 Sep. E. Fairbanks (Rep) elected.
Florida. 1860 Oct. J. Milton (Dem) elected.
Indiana. 1860 Oct. H. Lane (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
Pennsylvania. 1860 Oct. A. Curtin (Rep) elected. Rep gain from Dem.
Illinois. 1860 Nov. R. Yates (Rep) elected.
Massachusetts. 1860 Nov. J. Andrew (Rep) elected.
Michigan. 1860 Nov. A. Blair (Rep) elected.
New York. 1860 Nov. E. Morgan (Rep) re-elected.
South Carolina. 1860 Dec. F. Pickens (Dem) elected.

Closing position: Rep 16, Dem 15, Ind 2, American 1 †.

† Thomas Hicks (Maryland), who became a Unionist around 1860.

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(Pale yellow: Ind win - Arkansas)

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Here's the results of the first election of the new year, the Georgia Senate seat runoff elections.

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There's a fun game of spot the difference to be played here, because there's about 0.4% difference (as of this writing) between the races! The special election has been called for Raphael Warnock, confirming he'll be the first African-American ever elected to the Senate from Georgia (as well as the first Democrat to win a runoff in Georgia since the system was introduced, and the first Democrat to win a Senate race there at all since Zell Miller in 2000), and with the remaining votes to come in being from the strongly blue Atlanta suburbs, Jon Ossoff looks very likely to win too. If he does, it'll be the first time since the Tennessee Senate elections in 1994 that a state's whole Senate delegation has flipped from one party to the other in one election cycle, and will give the Democrats control of the Senate for the first time since 2014 and a trifecta for the first time since 2010.

Left-wing Dems might find it amusing to note that the black reverend of Martin Luther King's old church did better than Ossoff, who I've heard described on this forum before as 'bred in a lab somewhere to be the ideal white moderate suburban Dem candidate' not only in the overall popular vote, but also in almost every county, by a small margin (though centrist and right-wing Dems might want to point to Early County, where Ossoff did slightly better than Warnock- ironically enough, it's in the Georgia black belt rather than the suburbs).

I suspect Warnock was probably helped by his opponent Kelly Loeffler saying she would join the minority of Senate Republicans planning to vote against certifying Biden's victory in the Electoral College to try and prevent him being sworn in as President, and in any case, since he's up for the regularly scheduled Class 3 elections in 2022, it'll be very interesting to see if he can carve out a personal vote for himself in time to win a full term or if he'll go the way of Doug Jones.

I'm tempted to do a swing map from the last time Georgia did a Senate runoff in 2008 (where Democrat Jim Martin got trounced by almost 15 points) to see how much Warnock's victory and Ossoff's probable victory owe to a Democratic swing in the suburbs and cities, and whether parts of the countryside have swung so hard against them that even Martin did better.
 
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Here's a place for West Indies. The existence of the Federation was promising, but for many reasons (especially thanks to Jamaica) could not last long. However, it was all the more interesting to deal with the election data. It seems to be a good start for me, given the previous lack of 1958 results. Data by constituencies was taken by various newspapers, election reports and Google's books (what a pain!), the names of candidates are given as fully as possible. In short, I feel tired, but happy to share it.

witable.png
 
View attachment 616793

Here's a place for West Indies. The existence of the Federation was promising, but for many reasons (especially thanks to Jamaica) could not last long. However, it was all the more interesting to deal with the election data. It seems to be a good start for me, given the previous lack of 1958 results. Data by constituencies was taken by various newspapers, election reports and Google's books (what a pain!), the names of candidates are given as fully as possible. In short, I feel tired, but happy to share it.

View attachment 616816
Been looking for something like this for *years*, so this is super cool to see, @vjw ! Really fantastic work! Do you happen to have the chart data in spreadsheet/Google Sheet format, and if so, would you be willing to share it?
 
Been looking for something like this for *years*, so this is super cool to see, @vjw ! Really fantastic work! Do you happen to have the chart data in spreadsheet/Google Sheet format, and if so, would you be willing to share it?
Catch it! TBH I'd be happy if someone used these data in the wiki, for example.
 

Attachments

  • westindies.zip
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This was my attempt to map the 1960 South African republic referendum by (geographical) constituency, rather than simply by province. However, as I cannot for the life of me find even a single constituency map of South Africa during the apartheid era, hexagons had to do.
Information from Parlementêre verkiesings in Suid-Afrika 1910-1976. Green is for republic, red is against.

SouthAfricaRefMap.png
 
Here's a place for West Indies. The existence of the Federation was promising, but for many reasons (especially thanks to Jamaica) could not last long. However, it was all the more interesting to deal with the election data. It seems to be a good start for me, given the previous lack of 1958 results. Data by constituencies was taken by various newspapers, election reports and Google's books (what a pain!), the names of candidates are given as fully as possible. In short, I feel tired, but happy to share it.
Very nice. Were the smaller islands also divided into constituencies, or did they elect by bloc vote?
This was my attempt to map the 1960 South African republic referendum by (geographical) constituency, rather than simply by province. However, as I cannot for the life of me find even a single constituency map of South Africa during the apartheid era, hexagons had to do.
Information from Parlementêre verkiesings in Suid-Afrika 1910-1976. Green is for republic, red is against.
Apartheid-era South African elections are one of the longstanding "holy grail" projects of election mapping - as you say, constituency maps are elusive (it doesn't help that the current system is nationwide list PR, so the Electoral Commission doesn't have a natural incentive to store constituency maps, current or old, on its website), and I suspect you would need to physically go to Pretoria or Cape Town to have a real chance of ever finding them.
 
Very nice. Were the smaller islands also divided into constituencies, or did they elect by bloc vote?
Thanks, I'm especially pleased to hear gratitude from you.
These islands with Barbados haven't issued acts on the division of territory into constituencies, so a single electoral area is established (according to Art. 19 of WI Constitution).
 
Bumping this thread with a little something I was able to make thanks to AJRElectionMaps posting the 1999 Australian form of government referendum meaning I could find a basemap for it: the 1998 federal election.

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As someone who's not that in-the-know about Auspol at this time besides the general context, 1998 interested me to map not just because I had the map and wanted to take the opportunity to see a pre-2007 Australian election by division, but also because it's a good example of a phenomenon I've noticed where the ALP get very close to getting the Coalition out of power, then stumble so badly in the subsequent Parliament that at the next election the Coalition are returned with a bigger majority (see also 1954, 1961 and 2016). What's particularly striking about 1998, of course, is that they nearly did so despite John Howard only being in power for 2 years after a record 13 unbroken years and five terms of Labor governments.

If anyone knows or wants to fill in more context, or correct any map errors (I was working from a 2007 map and the Wikipedia results to try and figure out which division is which), feel free to tell me.

EDIT: corrected some results in NSW, I got confused because I thought Gwydir was Calare.
 
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This was my attempt to map the 1960 South African republic referendum by (geographical) constituency, rather than simply by province. However, as I cannot for the life of me find even a single constituency map of South Africa during the apartheid era, hexagons had to do.
Information from Parlementêre verkiesings in Suid-Afrika 1910-1976. Green is for republic, red is against.

IMAGE

Yeah, hexagons are dumb. Let's try again.

B7gc66J.png
 
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Bumping this thread with a little something I was able to make thanks to AJRElectionMaps posting the 1999 Australian form of government referendum meaning I could find a basemap for it: the 1998 federal election.
Ah. I've actually already mapped that, I just hadn't posted it. Very nice work nonetheless.
EDIT: This page is very useful for this kind of thing.
 
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