Lions Lead Themselves: A Vignette

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Comisario, Dec 26, 2014.

  1. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    [​IMG]


    “Comrade Major!” Captain Eden still found it difficult to salute like a mutineer. The old salute, fingers affront the forehead, seemed terribly dated. Three months and now we are all revolutionaries. It seemed to be from a bygone era or a foreign country, lost beyond the waters of the English Channel. As with most of the formalities of war, the old salutes were cast aside. Major Attlee laid his pen down and looked up in silence at the rain-sodden Eden, his right hand fumbling into a fist to place against his temple.

    “Yes?” The major did not appreciate the interruption when he was composing his letters to the German headquarters in Paris. Of the last four, exactly none were dignified with responses. “What is it?”

    “A German officer has arrived from Paris, Major. He says he wants to speak with you privately, and apparently he has good news from Verdun.” The major promptly asked for this visitor to brought in from the cold. We were promised no more visits from Paris, and now this. Attlee stood, wiped the dirt from his sleeves, and watched his visitor with the utmost attention. He certainly looked the part of an officer: Pickelhaube and stiff-collared grey uniform, and even a neat moustache stretching from one corner of his mouth to the other. He took imperious strides along the uneven wooden boarding leading up to the major’s tent, managing well to balance himself as the mud-water ran beneath his boots.

    “Herr Attlee, it is good to finally make your acquaintance.” He extended a hand across the major’s desk. Attlee took it firmly in his grip. “I expect you received a phone call from our headquarters in Paris?”

    The major shook his head. “No, I’m afraid we have had no calls from Paris. Communications have been down, recently.” At this, von Papen seemed less than surprised. Captain Eden hurriedly closed the doors of the tent behind von Papen.

    “No matter- I am here now.” The captain gestured to his chair and Attlee gave his assent to sit down. “Now, I’m here to discuss… peace.”

    “Peace? We have peace. If you wish to discuss peace between Germany and Britain, then I suggest that you talk to the Prime Minister.” Attlee pictured the Prime Minister for a moment. The dour-faced Irishman, his hands flailing about in a mad fashion as he spat vitriol from the national podium his coup had bought him. Inside, Attlee shuddered.

    “You must know that this is not what we are discussing. No, instead we must discuss peace between the British and… the British.” Attlee knew at once what he was referring to. Captain von Papen continued with his little speech. “In your home islands, we see that the situation is deteriorating for Carson’s government. That is not our concern- the Prime Minister’s days are numbered.”

    Attlee agreed; there was no doubt about that. “It is peace here in France, and in Belgium, that is of our concern. Some units of the British armed forces have… resisted your mutiny, as I am sure you are aware.” The major knew exactly who he was talking about. Churchill. He was terrorising the French countryside, having shot a few dozen of his own men when the mutinies began, and had not been heard from since the beginning of November. "Winston Churchill is still with the Royal Scots Fusiliers, I'm afraid. And, as the reports have suggested, he had been planning on moving north to Calais."

    "Where is the good news in all of this?" Attlee asked, his mind thrown back to Eden's introduction of Captain von Papen. The slightly gaunt-faced captain reached into his tunic and retrieved a brown folder. From his hands, it passed to Attlee's.

    "His fusiliers were routed at Verdun. Casualty figures were in our good favour." A smile flared up at the corner of von Papen's mouth. Attlee could feel the German's eyes burrowing into the crown of his skull as he rifled through the papers. Contained within were clippings of maps detailing the route of Churchill's battalion across northern France, accompanied by reports of the destruction left in Churchill's wake. Executions, raids, supply requisitions- the man is fighting a guerrilla war.

    "Why do I need to see this?" Captain von Papen's smiling ceased at that question.

    "I know it is... unorthodox. But, the report belongs to you and your Soldiers' Committee now. You will find it useful once you have heard my proposition." The captain was smiling once again. His smile, his insidious smile, troubled Major Attlee no end. "Germany needs your men to help capture Churchill."

    "No."

    "But, you would-..."

    "No." Attlee watched as the German officer squirmed in his seat. Both of them knew that, on this matter above all others, his opinion was immovable. "If that is all, Captain von Papen, then I'm afraid our business here has concluded."

    "That is all, Major." He stood. "Expect a reply from Paris soon, by the way. Your letters are so full of questions- our intelligence department cannot answer them all so quickly, you see?"

    Attlee rose from his chair and shouted for Captain Eden, who had not left the perimeter of the major's makeshift abode. The young captain hurriedly opened the major's tent, and subsequently met the gazes of a vexed German officer and a stoic Major Attlee. "Would you please escort Herr von Papen back to the road, Comrade Captain? I expect his car is still waiting outside."

    The German took his leave with a scowl upon his face, marching out of the tent and into the distance as Captain Eden tried to keep up with his determined pace. Major Attlee would have chortled, had the proposition not have been so deadly serious. Let the butcher run, he'll be captured eventually. And Attlee was not going to let good men die just to do it. He was not so vainglorious as to pursue Churchill through the winter months, whilst good men longing for home fell to the cold and Winston's fusiliers. No. That was too much to ask. As Chairman of the Soldiers' and Workers' Committee, it was his duty to keep his men away from the war as much as possible.

    "Comrade Major!" At the head of a column of men, Wedgwood Benn came striding up the wooden plank path. The Committee, aside from Attlee and Benn, was a group of young men. None of them had reached thirty yet, but they were still entrusted by their comrade soldiers to voice their woes and decide for this "commune of mutineers". They filed into Attlee's tent, which Captain Eden then closed off from the rest of the camp. The chairs behind Attlee's desk could not hold all Committee members, and so Lieutenant Owen and Private Pollitt took to the major's bed in the corner of the room. They dragged it forward, so as to hear the deliberations of this inner council meeting.

    "Right- what business is first?" Attlee asked, knowing in his mind that the German would be their sole topic of conversation. Usually, it would be rations, but the arrival of an agent of the Kaiser seemed far more pressing.

    "When are the Germans delivering our rations? We've come to the end of our beef and jam, and the tobacco's got less than a week left. When do we get new rations?" The Lancastrian, Private Pollitt, was the first to speak. Attlee had little time for him; the feeling was mutual. Pollitt had been an anti-war activist, and had only been pressed into service in 1917. Bloody firebrand- he thinks he's Comrade MacDonald.

    "I've had no word from Paris concerning rations. If we must... then we will scout out Saint-Omer for food." Attlee had had enough of bullying the townspeople of the Pas-de-Calais, but these were desperate times. The winter will be hard on us all. "I promise you that we will not go hungry."

    Lieutenant Tolkien scoffed. "Was your visitor not here about our supplies then?" So... they did see him.

    "No. Herr von Papen wanted us to aid in the capture of Winston Churchill and his battalion." He pushed the folder at his desk across to Captain Wedgwood Benn, still in his air force dress. "The details are in here."

    "16th of November... offensive... Verdun. 150 dead... Churchill possibly wounded..." Benn's eyes lit up. "This is exactly what we've needed, comrades! Churchill is on the bloody run! What did you-...?"

    Major Attlee shook his head. "I declined the offer."

    "What?" Tolkien and Benn chorused.

    "No more bloodshed- not for Carson; not for the Kaiser," Lieutenant Owen interrupted. "You were right to decline, Comrade Major."

    Attlee could always rely on the Committee's resident poet. He agreed because, like all those men outside the tent with their fears and their families back home, he wanted to be far away. He wants to go home for peace.... The bolshie Private Pollitt echoed the sentiments, but for different reasons entirely. ...and he wants a revolution.

    "We have nearly seven thousand men, comrade. Churchill's bandits must number less than half our own." Tolkien nodded along with every word that the airman said. "This is a lost opportunity, truly."

    "We could have helped our German comrades, Major. Imagine the rations if we-..."

    "I appreciate our German comrades, Lieutenant Tolkien, and they have surely treated us well enough. It would be unwise, however, to give up our own men for one measly life," Lance-Corporal Priestley, with his Bradfordian accent and his thick eyebrows, interceded. "What is one Churchill against every workingman in this army?"

    A silence fell over them. Good man, Priestley. The rain pelted the tent, the men stayed quiet, and Captain Wedgwood Benn passed the file back to the major.

    Pollitt motioned to speak. "When are we going home, at least?" The question sat upon their collective tongues, and Harry's was elected to speak. "There's a revolution at home and we all-..."

    "Nothing has been confirmed... yet. Once the Royal Navy has been cleared from the Channel, I expect we shall be sent to the Port of Calais. However, the Sailors' Committees are all in Kiel, as far as I know." It was a guess: a long-shot. The reply from Paris will have some information, at least. Major Attlee expected at least half the Navy ended up in mutiny, but it seemed as if no reassurance was forthcoming. Another silence fell over them.

    "If that is all, comrades." The Committee rose as one. Each member placed his fist against his temple, said his goodbyes, and shuffled outside. Attlee returned to his desk, uneasy with the great many tasks he still had to attend to.

    Eden was saluting like a mutineer, Attlee noted as he drew his head from his desk and upwards to face his young assistant. "Captain."

    "Yes, comrade sir?" His revolutionary mannerisms were still lacking in places, and they even sounded rather daft in his Etonian accent.

    "If we have any tea left, comrade, then I would like a cup." Eden nodded and turned to leave. "And a newspaper, if at all possible... the newest one you can find. I should like to see if MacDonald and Lansbury haven't already raised the red flag over Westminster."

     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2014
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  2. Blackadder mk 2 Well-Known Member

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    I wonder if the placement of Edward Carson into Prime Minister relates to our discussion in your thread on the Labour Party in WWI, or if Churchill accepted Law's challenge in 1910 and the Chamberlain/Long battle ended with Carson standing as the compromise candidate in the race, as Lady Londonderry and a few others yearned for him to do, and so took the crown when Asquith was found wanting. Either way, it's interesting how the Germans seem happy to let the Commune exist by itself, and the fact that they are withholding rations from them, which suggests that the naval blockade is still biting, and there is a bit of revolutionary fervour growing in the German ranks.

    It's interesting to see the conflict from Eden (who I imagined more joined out of either this, death, or Churchill, in order of most displeasing choices) as the spectrum of the uncomfortable soldier, I'm guessing a few aren't happy that they've technically lost, to figures like Attlee who seem more concerned with staying alive and getting home, to Pollitt who would probably let everyone die if it meant another step in The Eventual World Revolution. I see Wedgewood-Benn being converted to a much more radical shape of socialism, while Tolkien's conflict over whether the Orcs are actually 'evil' being much stronger.

    The big question is whether the Soldiers' Committees are united under a single banner of purpose i.e. those who joined because of moral reasons against those of more material ones, and if the revolution is actually happening. After all, it's no good having Carson replaced with Horatio Bottomley or Alfred Milner, even if the latter may be more likely to accept the material demands of certain soldiers, provided the ring-leaders get thrown to the wolves, and they seem to be dependent on the Germans for information on whether the Navy is with them or not. Churchill is the big looming figure over them all, and I suspect that things for Von Papen aren't going that well, if they're relying on the mutineers to try and handle it, which is suggesting a collapse all around.

    Good work, I was certainly pleased.
     
  3. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    A few of my recent threads, including my Asquith one and the anti-war Labour Party thread, have sprouted from this idea. So yes, it all certainly pertains to that discussion. The idea of the People's Budget passing first time, and other assorted butterflies, have basically culminated in the terrible current state of affairs.

    The Soldiers' Commune is basically "Lenin's passage through Germany" writ-large. The army's been decimated in France and Belgium, and so the radicals in the army have come to be seen as Lenin-like figures in that they are useful to the ends of Imperial Germany but are ideologically opposed. There's certainly discontent about the withholding of rations, to be sure- but, the situation's very complex. Attlee's seeming acceptance of the lack of rations (although, evidently, he has back up plans) should suggest that the Germans have quite an occupation on their hands. But yes, the naval battle is not yet won and it's anyone's guess as to what effect the Navy is having on German trade.

    Eden really fascinates me in that he lost his brother in the First World War, which still happens ITTL, and became so obsessed by peace after the war. Here, Churchill going off at the deep end and the longing for peace within Eden have made the young captain much more receptive to the mutineers. Attlee wants to be home, same as Owen (who was definitely no socialist revolutionary, but definitely not against challenging the accepted order of things), but he's still the socialist he was. His thinking is not so far departed from Pollitt's ITTL. Both want a revolution, but they each have their own limits on how far it should be pursued and at what cost.

    Wedgwood Benn has become fairly radicalised, especially given the Soldiers' and Workers' Committee has no functioning air wing. He wants to curry favour with the Germans, as does the young Tolkien.

    The Soldiers' Committees are disparate and divided, you see. Attlee controls one of the largest, but there are many others dotted around. They have been given "reservations", in effect, to live on whilst the troopships are being sorted out. As to what the revolution is and what it is achieving, I'll leave that ambiguous.

    Churchill- he's a cross between Colonel Kurtz and Luigi Cadorna.

    The situation in German-controlled France is a mess, and I'm glad you picked up on that. There are still anti-mutineers and pro-mutineers fighting in the countryside, with Frenchmen chafing under the German forces (who seem basically prepared for a mutiny themselves). The mutineers are trusted, to an extent, as feelings have turned from Germanophobia to class struggle over the course of Britain's disastrous conduct of the war.

    Glad to hear it! :)
     
  4. Ed Costello Like tickling a trout in the wild

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    This is a quite delightful piece - if a rather bleak world. It's fascinating to see the different personalities rubbing up against each other; primarily Eden and Attlee, though Owen and Tolkein are the two which really fascinate me.

    Lovely, lovely stuff. More please!
     
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  5. Blackadder mk 2 Well-Known Member

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    On the People's Budget passing first time, I'm guessing that it involves the land tax proposal being dropped or not included? I remember reading that this was the straw that broke the camel's back, in the eyes of the Lords when they voted down the Budget, and it was dropped later on (fuelling the idea among some Tories that it had been a way to remove the power of the Lords for Home Rule) so it makes sense.
     
  6. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    Thank you! I'm glad that you liked the interplay of the different personalities- I put a lot of consideration into Attlee and Eden's little relationship, especially.

    Indeed, that is exactly the POD. The land tax ITTL was quietly shot down for being too Georgist and radical, so it passed first time (accompanied by a small dose of common sense for the Tory Lords just in time to vote on the budget).
     
  7. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    Just though I'd bump this for those who didn't see it last night.

    Anymore comments, anyone?
     
  8. Blackadder mk 2 Well-Known Member

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    Germany has won, but arguably has lost more than some of their own nations. I'm imagining that the rest of the Central Powers have collapsed, and the war in Europe is the only field where they have won, and even that has become plagued with guerilla warfare on the Western Front, and they're trying to outsource their occupation to the people who have stopped fighting. If Germany falls into chaos, then I imagine neither the French nor Attlee are going to be very upset with the whole thing, but then we will probably see the French government politely asking them to bugger off, and then they'll have to hope that the government is kind or the revolution has taken hold.

    Of course, the Revolution may not be a unified one, if the French have bitter memories of the Germans, the British taking what food remains or burning it, and the Germans start grumbling about Lenin trying to muscle in on their turf and make himself in charge of Germany, and the British keep trying to keep to their own, only to be dragged in again.

    I'm guessing what to do, whether the revolution happens or the regime still stands, for Attlee will be difficult. I can see Eden joining up, especially if the hate-figure of his youth was leading the counter-strike, and his relationship with Attlee is very well-done, although I am curious as to how the Soldier's Committee would split in such a case of 'agree to crush them and you can go home, peace with honour and no reparations or land lost'. Mosley is liking leading another one, and I can see him in either camp from Churchill to Pollitt in favour of using the men for the 'right path', whether creating a Socialist Republic, or to curb down on the traitors and set Britain right, naturally under his leadership.

    Benn is probably in that contingent of Radicals who have made the leap to Labour, and are now making another leap as Henderson and the other moderates scramble to find the position between peace for all and not having a load of mini-Grayson's come rallying home. Oh lord, Grayson. I wonder if he backed the war ITTL, or if he represents another Soldier's Committee, those who were in favour but now want to go home and change things.

    That's another problem, seeing as we have many deep-thinkers, all in positions of leadership of a small army, but they have to balance out the fact that they're just as likely to get the chop as the old officers if they push the men too far towards their own goals.

    All in all, it probably depends on what happens and whether the man afterwards can bring people together. If it's Asquith, I see the situation stagnating and collapsing as he tires to turn back the clock, Lloyd George would be trapped between his reputation and his yearning to keep in power and appease the radicals, and any hard-liner is probably going to have a hard time, even if they welcome it. Bottomley would send men charging to kill everyone, while he robs the Treasury of all it has, and probably set the stage for some sort of dictatorship later, Milner would be panicking over the Red Scare and be trying to find a way to create a social contract that involves keeping all this nice state power and censorship, while also making sure that everyone's nice and happy.

    Of course, Attlee, Pollitt, and a few others would have to be killed. They're traitors after all.

    MacDonald and Lansbury have the problem that they're two different people. MacDonald's revolutionary fervour is probably more defensive and born from a sense that he just wants the war to end and then elections can be had, while Lansbury could be won over by the more revolutionary figures who suggest that perhaps a few parties should be banned, and why not wait a bit for elections, just until they make sure that everything's hunky dory. Why get rid of DORA just yet? Just change Realm to Socialist Republic, and we're fine.

    I imagine Churchill's faction, the stab in the back and the 'we are fighting evil and must do what we can' lot are probably either officers trying not to be shot, the remains of professional soldiers and hardcore anti-Germans and anti-socialist and a fair few who were won over by stirring speeches made on the stump after asking why they had to burn down those French people's barns when they were supposed to protect them. The move to Calais, and his likely greater knowledge, suggests that the Navy is sticking true to their guns and that there is at least a powerful faction at home who wants those troops quickly.

    Von Papen's desperation is clear in the writing, even as he tries to act as the triumphant master. I'm guessing that with victory comes the question of how to tell if they actually won, with the blockade still in place and Churchill and French guerilla forces doing everything they can to stop the Germans and the Germans attempting to make the food situation better, only to worsen the partisan campaign. I see food seizures, only for the trucks to be stopped and robbed, or even fields being burnt.

    Rural French anger at the Germans could still be around, and maybe in mix in with the urban class struggle after the crackdowns and the national unity fronts have been shown to fail. All the while, German soldiers are wondering whether they'll be shooting at French farmers, British soldiers in the wild, or their own people. Not something you'd want to be around.

    Ah, so a Tory victory in 1911 without the Lords rhetoric to defy the 'look at dem taxes gurl' campaign of the Tories, with maybe the introduction of the 'Whole Hog' programme introducing discontent after Balfour's hand is forced, leads to a very explicit war-like mood in the government's policy e.g. conscription, war economy, etc., while the Liberals are trapped by coalition and have to play along. Maybe instead of a Unionist Business Committee, we see a Liberal Democratic Committee under a few radicals that oppose the expansion of government powers in this way, while Lloyd George and Churchill burn their bridges by signing on 110% to the efforts, the latter not caring and the former starting to wonder if it'll be him on the firing line.
     
  9. Mumby im that bob

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    Just popping in to say that I have given this a skim, prepared my body, and have given it a proper once over. Beautiful stuff.

    Such name-dropping. Wow.
     
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  10. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    Thanks a lot :)

    If I find time, I might follow this up and post my next vignette from this TL.

    Do you think you'd be interested in seeing things from Churchill's side? I'm sure you could already guess some of the members of his entourage, especially his own personal "Eden".
     
  11. Blackadder mk 2 Well-Known Member

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    On the one hand, I want to know more, but on the other, I fear that my predictions will be completely wrong. I imagine things aren't nearly as great as Churchill thinks, but better than the Germans and Attlee are hoping for, as his keeps on convincing the 3-4 thousand men to keep on the push to Calais, and it is strange how the Germans seem eager to have a much smaller and less organised army try to stop them. It's suggesting that the German army is either a lot worse than everyone thinks, resources are being diverted elsewhere which suggests civil unrest across their conquests, and that the group are stronger than Papen is saying, or just a mixture of all three.

    The Kurtz/Cardona comparison makes me wonder if Churchill is commanding a well-trained, loyal army, but uses them to crush anything that either helps the Germans, or looks like they didn't leap at the chance to throw themselves at Jerry while they still had the chance. The extent in which he is commanding them is a fair question, the man could delegate and accept mistakes, but there were moments where he forced in control IOTL, and there's nothing to say that he isn't motivated to do so now.

    All in all, not a nice place to be in, if you're seen as having let Britain down.
     
  12. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    I'd say that things are a mixed bag for Churchill. His 3,000 or so follows are still marching on, ransacking the countryside and eliminating "non-cooperation" as an option for the French peasantry.

    Remember that the British mutineers aren't completely trusted by the Germans, and not even the German soldiers are fully trusted by their officers either. All of this, and some of the other reasons you gave too, will become clearer once we've seen things from Churchill's side.

    You're certainly very close with your ideas. "Forced in control", that side of Churchill's personality that comes out when he was historically faced with great military challenges and very few options, will play a great part in the control of his army. Of course, a lack of control will come into play with some members of his inner circle.
     
  13. Meadow but see, when Meadow does that, Monthly Donor

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    This is great. The sense of a Highly Improbable Boys' Club Of People From The Future did irk me a bit, but I really can't complain given Agent Lavender.

    The writing itself was stellar, I found it very readable indeed. The picture of a revolutionary British Army being treated - as you say - as thousands of Lenins in one big sealed train was a lovely approach. I like the ambiguity of the end: I don't know that this army will march home and join the march on London, though it appears Lansbury and MacDonald have got there already.

    I know this is a vignette, but if you were to continue it, I would strongly insist that we see Winston Churchill staring back at the distant White Cliffs as he hears the news from London via a runner. I think his next lines would be obvious...

    "The British Revolution is over. The British Civil War is about to begin."
     
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  14. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    Don't worry, it irked me slightly before I planned to write it up. It all seems fairly far-fetched, but alternate history is very often just that. I just took the figures that seemed like they'd be elected to lead such a revolutionary council: bold, radical, and with a certain penchant for leadership. Not to say, of course, that regular soldiers wouldn't have the same qualifications. But, remember, these men are just "regular soldiers" at this point in history.

    To my shame, I still haven't got round to reading Agent Lavender...

    Thank you very much for the praise!

    Certainly, Attlee believes that Lansbury and MacDonald have made it to London. But, whether that is true or not will remain a mystery.

    Churchill still has a long way to go until he reaches the Channel... so his scenes would resemble something more like a rural French version of this. (Couldn't find the right video on YouTube of this film with the Anglo-Saxon supremacists walking through a burning city full of Nicaraguans that they shoot nonchalantly, but this is just as apt)
     
  15. V-J Not a Donor

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    This is good stuff, 'much above average writing'. My issue was largely that the endless cast of thousands obscured the actual narrative; 'Oh, him? What would he be-' replaced focus on what was actually happening. The overall quality of the writing was, as I say, though, really high. I think most people, including myself, are left with a sense of 'we want to know more' from this which is always a mark of quality and good execution.
     
  16. Comisario ‘Lim’ is short for ‘Liment Voroshilov’

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    Ah, thanks for the kind words!

    I didn't want to keep it too small, you see? Given that it was just a vignette, I wanted to bring together as many different viewpoints and sources of information as possible. It would have been fairly easy to just drop a few random soldiers in and make them speak the lines of Priestley and Tolkien, but I just thought that would make it a bit... sterile.

    As I am writing the follow-up, I will keep your criticisms in mind. Churchill's inner circle will be more "exclusive", so as to not detract from the story.
     
  17. Meadow but see, when Meadow does that, Monthly Donor

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    Don't worry at all, I was just aware that we used a few Future Famous People in it, though in almost all cases they had a relatively plausible real-life reason to play the role in the story that they played. I can say similar here: the fact they're all in one place is a bit jarring, but I can believe them all getting involved ideologically.

    Then I eagerly await whatever followups will ensue!

    L'horreur... l'horreur...
     
  18. Daewonsu Banned

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    For starters, I like the writing, but I have no idea what happened to have come down to this, or who is on what side. This is likely due to my lack of knowledge of WW1 British politics, but could someone summarize it for a beginner like myself?


    Also, I assume the POD was before 1916, since Tolkien was invalided to England on 8 November 1916.
     
  19. pdf27 Making sparks fly!

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    Churchill will no doubt be thinking of the Anabasis here - it's one of the best known works of Greek literature, and he's suddenly found himself in the position of Xenophon...
     
  20. Badshah Badshah-e-Alam

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    I'd like to see the viewpoint of maybe Dominion and Colonial soldiers as well; their reactions to this would be really important in the ongoing fate of the British Empire, at least to some degree.