DBWI: CCR the iconic music for Vietnam movies

What would have to have happened, both in terms of how the war went historically and how it is perceived by later generations, for CCR's music to be used as much in Vietnam movies as the music of that OTHER group is?
 
I'm sorry, what CCR songs would even make sense for Vietnam movies? Like, I love me some Creedence, but Bad Moon Rising? Have You Ever Seen the Rain? Sweet Hitchhiker? I don't think Heart of Darkness would've been improved if Door to Door was playing.

(OOC: Went with the assumption that Fogerty never wrote Fortunate Son.)
 
Like, I love me some Creedence, but Bad Moon Rising?
Why NOT Bad Moon Rising? If the war had gone worse than it did for the west, the apocalyptic imagery in that song might have been the perfect fit. One eye is taken for an eye...

(OOC: I was actually assuming that the CCR songbook remains the same as OTL, but the war goes in such a way as to make their music seem less appropriate. But we can stick with no Fortunate Son.)
 
Why would Vietnamese directors do that? Their postwar films are all such rambling existentialist noir pieces, like Days In Hue ; having English-language bubblegum rock like CCR would make no sense, artistically. Maybe Claude François or some other French pop artist, but even that I doubt.
 
Why would Vietnamese directors do that? Their postwar films are all such rambling existentialist noir pieces, like Days In Hue ; having English-language bubblegum rock like CCR would make no sense, artistically. Maybe Claude François or some other French pop artist, but even that I doubt.
Yeah, you might need a different postwar Vietnam for this to work. Maybe something more Brezhnevite than Titoist in its influences. Not that the Brezhnevites would be huge fans of US rock music, but they'd probably at least avoid the artsy New Wave stuff.
 
Why would Vietnamese directors do that? Their postwar films are all such rambling existentialist noir pieces, like Days In Hue ; having English-language bubblegum rock like CCR would make no sense, artistically. Maybe Claude François or some other French pop artist, but even that I doubt.
I think he's talking about American movies about the Vietnam War.
 
I think he's talking about American movies about the Vietnam War.
I can’t see the phallus reclaimed action movies like “POW Prison Break II” or “Haiphong Aces” for the working class using folk dreck. I associate these films with hair rock.

And for the middle class “Sensitive college volunteer: stabbed in the back” was made three or four times.

There’s that cross over film about steel industry wogs in Vietnam where the female lead sings the star spangled banner at the end. I guess they didn’t have anything meaningful to say with the film. It’s kind of a working class dolchstosse legende film. I guess if they made more of this and less of the other two you might get rock folk cross over.

Personally I prefer hair metal air battle.
 
I can’t see the phallus reclaimed action movies like “POW Prison Break II” or “Haiphong Aces” for the working class using folk dreck. I associate these films with hair rock.
Yeah, but what about some of the British produced films, reworked as American offerings?

In OTL's Sunrise At My Lai, there's the climax where Calley and his crew are about to slaughter all the supposed commies, but at the last minute they get notified by British military intelligence that the villagers are almost all innocent civilians. So after an awkward couple of minutes just standing there wondering what to do, they all just start dancing around with the villagers, scored to I'm Into Something Good by Herman's Hermits.

I'm picturing an American version of the same film, using Willy And The Poor Boys for that scene.
 
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