Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes

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Next in my series. Here's Quebec's next election.

During Cauchon's first term, the National Assembly was able to accomplish very little. Although Cauchon would occasionally find an ally in the ADQ, most of the time neither the PQ (who opposed almost all of his policies solely for political purposes) or the ADQ would be willing to pass the government's legislation, leading to a period of deadlock for several months.

Furthermore, Cauchon and President Lucien Bouchard were unable to agree on key policies, and the relationship between the two was strained and often hostile.

An unsatisfactory budget, along with Cauchon's attempts to extend an olive branch to Canada, led to the PQ and ADQ announcing they could no longer support the government, triggering an election.

Quebec legislative 2005.png

Though Marois ran her campaign on ending the power-struggle between the President and the Prime Minister, Cauchon ran his campaign on the much more appealing promise of ending the constant deadlock in the National Assembly. In the end, this appealed to more voters, and the Liberals won a majority government.

With a stable National Assembly, pundits soon turned their attention to the Presidential election, less than a year away...

Presidents of Quebec:
Jacques Parizeau (
Parti Quebecois) 1996-2001
Lucien Bouchard (
Parti Quebecois) 2001-20XX

Prime Ministers of Quebec:
Lucien Bouchard (Parti Quebecois) 1996-2001
Pauline Marois (
Parti Quebecois) 2001-2004
Martin Cauchon (Liberal) 2004-20XX

Prime Ministers of Canada:
Jean Chretien (Liberal) 1993-1997
Brian Tobin (Liberal) 1997-1998

Joe Clark (Progressive Conservative) 1998-2001
Preston Manning (Reform) 2001-20XX

Independent Quebec!
Quebec presidential election 1996 and Quebec legislative election 1996
Canadian federal election 1998

Quebec presidential election 2001 and Quebec legislative election 2000
Canadian federal election 2001
Canadian federal election 2003
Quebec legislative election 2004
Canadian federal election 2004

Quebec legislative 2005.png
 
1980 Canadian Election
Having won a minority, Pierre Trudeau hopes to use the same trick he played in 1974 to be back with a majority in a year. However, he cannot account for what's happening in the PC camp. Weakened by a narrow defeat Clark is forced to give equal billing to leadership rival Brian Mulroney, who pursues a "Quebec Strategy" of appealing to "soft" Quebec Nationalists alienated by both Trudeau and the unsuccessful sovereignty referendum. He also manages to convince 2 Social Credit MPs to join the Tories. Trudeau is hampered by both Broadbent's NDP refusing to play ball and accusations that his vetoing of Canadian involvement in an attempt to rescue American diplomats from Iran led to their deaths. In October the NDP abstains from a vote of confidence and Trudeau is forced into another election in which the Liberal campaign was described later by Jean Chretien as "a total shambles". Clark wins a comfortable majority electing 18 MPs from Quebec, including the new Foreign Minister Brian Mulroney and his ally Lucien Bourchard.



1981 UK General Election
Historians will forever be divided over Callaghan's government. Some prefer to talk about his (mostly) good relationship with unions as opposed the strife and antagonism of his predecessor and successor; his (reluctant) support for the Scottish Parliament, his conciliatory tone towards the IRA (preventing many riots) and achieving Harold Wilson's dream of making Labour a "party of government". Others talk about his inability to curb militant unionism, his increasingly divided party,his perceived softness on crime and Chancellor Healey's inability to prevent Britain slipping back into recession. By late 1979 his slim majority had turned into a minority due to a series of high-profile defections to nationalist parties and the Liberals. Bungling a vote of confidence like Trudeau, he is relentlessly attacked in the campaign by Whitelaw's Tories: their leader having improved his debating skills since 1978, they get a secure majority of 50. The Liberals also make a major breakthrough, almost doubling their seat total. In a display of Party unity appoints former leadership rival Margaret Thatcher as Home Secretary and in a snub to Ted Kennedy makes radical Unionist Airey Neave Northern Irish Secretary.



TL-74
UK General Election, February 1974
UK General Election, October 1974
UK General Election, 1978 & Canadian Federal Election 1979
US Presidential Elections, 1976 and 1980
 
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You had similar ideas to me in that timeline I never finished then, that's pretty much what I had except I kept the name Saturn.

One question is if Nintendo had then used the Ultra prefix for UNES games like they used the 64 suffix in OTL. Now in OTL the "Super" prefix got a bit confused because although it was used to distinguish SNES games (e.g. Super Metroid, Super Castlevania IV) "Super" had also previously been used for some NES games, most obviously Super Mario Bros. Ultra hadn't really been used before though, so it would be interesting to see if we got Ultra Mario Bros. instead of Super Mario 64, etc.
In the timeline there will be games with the Ultra prefix or suffix but the Mario game that launched with it was called Super Mario 3D Adventure in my timeline. Feel free to check it out, links in my sig :)
 
So, is the ADQ exactly the same as OTL? Or, since Independence succeeded, are they more inclined to be "Anti-Federalist"?

And what about Max Bernier? What's he up too?
Pretty much the same. With regards to Canada, their position is in favour of the status quo, i.e. keeping the two countries separated. They aren't really as vocal about Canadian-Quebec relations as either the Liberals or the PQ are.

As for Maxime Bernier, as of 2005 he's a prominent ADQ MNA who is seen as a strong critic and potential leader should Dumont retire.
 
So how are things working out for the Maritimes? They're pretty isolated from the rest of Canada - is there talk of separation, or is the split being handled well (though with a Reform government I can't imagine that'd be the case)?
 
So how are things working out for the Maritimes? They're pretty isolated from the rest of Canada - is there talk of separation, or is the split being handled well (though with a Reform government I can't imagine that'd be the case)?
I'm guessing that some in the Acadian community would like to see New Brunswick join with Quebec, and if Bernard Lord is indeed Premier (He was born in Quebec) it's going to put him in a very awkward situation. But who knows, the Atlantic may simply join into one province so to better their chances of staying in Canada.
 
So how are things working out for the Maritimes? They're pretty isolated from the rest of Canada - is there talk of separation, or is the split being handled well (though with a Reform government I can't imagine that'd be the case)?
The Maritimes have grudgingly accepted the split. They do feel a certain sense of isolation, but there is little support for joining with Quebec or even the United States, and most people acknowledge that their economy is too weak to make separation a feasible option - this is particularly apparent given the economic difficulties that both Quebec and Canada suffered after separation.
 
Next in my series. Here's Canada's next election.

Following Paul Martin's resignation, the first major political event of the 39th Canadian Parliament was the Liberal leadership race. Although the field included such strong contenders like Allan Rock, John Manley, Sheila Copps, and Lloyd Axworthy, former New Brunswick Premier Frank McKenna was the clear frontrunner. Although some expressed doubts as to whether or not a former Premier could win a federal election (something that hadn't happened in Canadian history), McKenna won a relatively comfortable third-ballot victory.

With Preston Manning's government unpopular, and McKenna needing a seat in the House of Commons, McKenna made it clear that the Liberals would not be supporting the government and would try to force an election. With both the PCs and NDP making gains in opinion polls, largely at Reform's expense, all three parties decided to bring down the government and try their luck in an election.

Canada 2006.png

Although the NDP and PCs had hoped to make major gains, McKenna was successfully able to frame the election as between the Liberals or Reform. McKenna was able to bring together voters fed up with the Reform government over to the Liberals, and as a result won a minority government.

Manning resigned as Reform leader shortly after the election, after a record 19 years leading the party. With Reform largely known as the "Preston Manning party", some Reform insiders began to consider changing the name of the party in an attempt to rebrand. Lewis MacKenzie, meanwhile, resigned as leader of the Progressive Conservatives, having failed to make the gains that had been predicted.

Presidents of Quebec:
Jacques Parizeau (
Parti Quebecois) 1996-2001
Lucien Bouchard (
Parti Quebecois) 2001-20XX

Prime Ministers of Quebec:
Lucien Bouchard (Parti Quebecois) 1996-2001
Pauline Marois (
Parti Quebecois) 2001-2004
Martin Cauchon (Liberal) 2004-20XX

Prime Ministers of Canada:
Jean Chretien (Liberal) 1993-1997
Brian Tobin (Liberal) 1997-1998

Joe Clark (Progressive Conservative) 1998-2001
Preston Manning (Reform) 2001-2006
Frank McKenna (Liberal) 2006-20XX

Independent Quebec!
Quebec presidential election 1996 and Quebec legislative election 1996
Canadian federal election 1998

Quebec presidential election 2001 and Quebec legislative election 2000
Canadian federal election 2001
Canadian federal election 2003
Quebec legislative election 2004
Canadian federal election 2004
Quebec legislative election 2005

Canada 2006.png
 
I hope we get to see the Reform leadership contest. Also, ever notice that Manning and Ron Paul look extremely similar? Of course, they're almost the same politically as well, so I guess being fiscally conservative and isolationist just does that to you.
 
Benjamin Franklin Griffin (born January 30, 2041) is an American politician, academic, colonial administrator and anthropologist who is currently a Special Advisor to the President for Race Relations. He had previously served in several positions within the White House and Department of the Frontier, and is most widely known as the principal author of several First Nations and race relations bills in the 2080s and 2110s.

Griffin was originally an anthropologist, having graduated summa cum laude from Duke University and later the United States University Denver. His doctoral thesis was on the centaur people of Titan, primarily the nomads of the Xanadu region. He was widely regarded as an expert on centaurs, and was appointed by President Maria GOnzalez Pinzon as the Governor of Chiron Territory on Titan during the Third Xanadu War of 2077. Afterwards, he was appointed Assistant Secretary of the Frontier for Titanian Affairs by President Douglas Grayson in 2081, and was instrumental in authoring the Population Registration and Control Act of 2081 and the First Nations Authorities Act of 2081. He would become one of the chief segregationist policy makers in the Grayson administration during the 2080s.

Returning to the academic world in the 2090s, Griffin was awarded a law degree from Harvard before returning to government under Republican Presidents George C. Lodge III and Alexandra Merritt in an attempt to right a floundering ship in the Frontier Department. When the Democrats returned to office under Andrew Oldfield, Griffin returned as the Administrator of the First Nations Commission. Griffin was widely critized by foreign officials for his handling of the Carcosa Mutiny of 2102. He was a chief aide to Douglas Grayson during his presidential run of 2104, and spent the next ten years as U.S. Attorney General, enforcing segregationist laws. He retired from public affairs to become Federal Envoy to Vega in 2115, a position he served in until the end of the second Grayson administration in 2117.

Griffin once again retired to academic, becoming a professor of anthropology and law at several institutions in the Pacific Northwest. He became heavily involved in Columbianism, eventually becoming a 15° Master Mason in his lodge. He was offered the Presidency of the United States University system in 2119 and 2126 and refused both times, and was reportedley shortlisted for the Democratic nomination for Vice President in 2116, 2120, 2128 and 2132. Following the Ionian emergency of 2129, he returned to public life as Frontier Secretary before stepping down to become a campaign advisor to Benjamin G. Thurman. Following Thurman's victory in 2132, Griffin became a special advisor for race relations.
 
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