A Brave New World: Football after the Bosman Ruling (An Alternate TL)

So it begins
With the strike of a gavel, football changed forever. The European Court Of Justice had just ruled that any footballer could now move freely at the end of a contract, and clubs could no longer hoard players and control their freedom of movement. How football would change, and what this meant for the games future, would be left to be seen. Join as we see how this moment changes the fates of players, managers, clubs, leagues, and even entire nations.
 
European Champions 1995-96
The following list is a list of champions from the European Leagues

UEFA Champions League: Juventus
UEFA Cup Winners Cup: PSG
UEFA Cup: Bayern Munich

Domestic Leagues
FA Premier League: Newcastle United
La Liga: Atletico Madrid
Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund
Ligue 1: Auxerre
Serie A: Juventus
Eredivisie: PSV Eindhoven
Scottish Premiership: Rangers
Russian League: Spartak Moscow
Primeira Division: FC Porto
 
So in this tl, players have to wait until their contract is over, instead of waiting until their last six months?

Looks like it - it wouldn't change much, though, at the end of the day. It'd be way more interesting if EU-wide free agency was allowed, as in OTL, but caps on foreign (even if EU) players were maintained, perhaps the same amount of foreign players for every EU country, to create a single standard. This way, top players such as Messi and Ronaldo would still be able to get signed by Barcelona and Real Madrid, for example, but the vast majority of players, even good players, would remain in their country - something that'd prevent smaller leagues ones from becoming feeder leagues in all but name.

The bigger leagues' top teams would be unable to stuff their rosters with foreigners, too - you'd still see some poaching of local players, but the gap between bigger and smaller teams wouldn't be as severe.
 
The following list is a list of champions from the European Leagues

UEFA Champions League: Juventus
UEFA Cup Winners Cup: PSG
UEFA Cup: Bayern Munich

Domestic Leagues
FA Premier League: Newcastle United
La Liga: Atletico Madrid
Bundesliga: Borussia Dortmund
Ligue 1: Auxerre
Serie A: Juventus
Eredivisie: PSV Eindhoven
Scottish Premiership: Rangers
Russian League: Spartak Moscow
Primeira Division: FC Porto
wow Newcastle United won Premier League yay
 
Looks like it - it wouldn't change much, though, at the end of the day. It'd be way more interesting if EU-wide free agency was allowed, as in OTL, but caps on foreign (even if EU) players were maintained, perhaps the same amount of foreign players for every EU country, to create a single standard. This way, top players such as Messi and Ronaldo would still be able to get signed by Barcelona and Real Madrid, for example, but the vast majority of players, even good players, would remain in their country - something that'd prevent smaller leagues ones from becoming feeder leagues in all but name.

The bigger leagues' top teams would be unable to stuff their rosters with foreigners, too - you'd still see some poaching of local players, but the gap between bigger and smaller teams wouldn't be as severe.
I have mine being 5 on the pitch at all times, so that teams would still have some leverage, but the squad would mainly be composed of national players. I can see the likes of France use the dual nationalities of its african-born players to play around the rule. Equal Revenue sharing and blood money being forbidden is also a must in my world.


And i actually did the research, and i foudn out that, even without blood money, Man City would still have a decent team in the early 10s since most of those key players, especially on defense, were bought for modest fees, and they produced good players internally at that time.

Hart

Zabaleta/Richards Kompany Touré/Onuoha Clichy

 Barton

Ireland Yaya Touré (that would be their most expensive signing without Blood Money)

Wright-Philips Johnson

Sturridge

As for Chelsea, obviously, they would lose out on all their success without Abramovich, but their british youth players that they never bothered to play would actually form a solid core in the 2020s:

Tammy Abraham
Ruben Loftus-Cheeks
The Chalobah Brothers
Fiyako Tomori
Reece James
Mason Mount
Connor Gallagher
Callum Hudson-Odoi

Combine that with the (extremely few lol) actually affordable signings they made, you'd have the making of a nice little team:

Mendy

James Tomori T. Chalobah Alonso

N. Chalobah/Gallagher

Mount Loftus-Cheeks

??? Hudson-Odoi

Abraham
 
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Scotland-France at Euro 96
UEFA Euro 1996 Quarterfinals

France-Scotland
The first matchup of what has been a great tournament arrives, with France facing Scotland at Old Trafford. The stands were full, as a large number of Scots made the short trip south to Manchester. Before kickoff, many Navy and White flags were waving throughout the crowd, and nerves were high for both squads. As France kicked off, chants mocking them reigned down from the Tartan Army. Les Bleus nearly silenced the fans, as Patrice Loko is left all alone just 11 yards out, but Andy Goram stands tall, making a save, and Tom Boyd is able to clear. A few short moments later, France gets another opportunity, but Vincent Guerin wastes it with a shot well over the bar. Nevertheless, the Scottish players look a little rattled in their first ever knockout stage match. Instead of being patient, though, Goram quickly collects the ball, takes a quick goal kick, and Ally McCoist begins to head a rapid counterattack. He quickly passes to John Collins, who makes a chipped pass to Gordon Durie, now left all alone with Lama. Durie quickly fakes a shot, cuts to the right, then quickly goes back to his left, getting around Lama and tapping the ball into the gaping net. Just like that, Scotland is ahead! Or are they? The referee talks with his comrades, and rules that McCoist fouled Desailly before he received the ball. Replays showed that the call was correct, but that would be little solace to the Scottish fans. Stuart McCall would get one final half-chance, but the first half would close with a 0-0 scoreline, despite the several opportunities. Scotland would bring on John Spencer for Durie for the second half. After several minutes of back and forth without any chances, Scotland wins a corner. No threat would come out of it, for Scotland, at least. France would clear the corner, and the clearance lands on the feet of Youri Djorkaeff, who did it all himself, taking the ball towards the goal, then laying it off to Zinedine Zidane, who does the honors and finishes the attack. In a flash, France lead, and it was the French fans turn to unleash their excitement. Scotland tries to go all out, hoping to score a goal and save their tournament. The Tartan Army fans urge them to get that goal. After a brief attack that results in no shots on goal, the first yellow card is shown, and Tom Boyd is the recipient of it. Scotland continues to press, trying to force a mistake and get a goal. This pressing leads to an opening, however, and France charges towards the goal. The sub striker, Christophe Dugarry, got a great opportunity to seal the win, but Andy Goram stands tall. His save is deflected right to Christian Karembeu, who volleys the deflection. Again, Goram makes an incredible stop, lunging at the ball and tipping it onto the crossbar. The bounce of the crossbar goes right to Youri Djorkaeff, who attempts a shot, but Goram again saves it, and Stewart McKimmie is at last able to clear. Scottish fans would erupt for Goram's heroic effort, and even some French fans applauded the Rangers keeper. With five minutes to go, it was going to take a lot for Scotland to get their goal. A final lifeline is given, as, in the 93rd minute, Laurent Blanc tackles McCoist to halt a Scottish attack, and Scotland gets a free kick from 22 yards out. Durie and McCoist stood over the ball, but Durie backed off to allow McCoist to do the honors. Instead of shooting, however, McCoist passed to his Rangers teammate, who struck a long shot. The ball seemingly floated in slow motion towards the right corner, where it is... stopped, thanks to the head of Zidane. France cleared the ball, and the final whistle rang out throughout Old Trafford, breaking Scottish hearts, and sending France into the semi-final. Following the match, McCoist announced his retirement from the national team.


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Scotland Fans before the match at Old Trafford


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Zinedine Zidane finishes the goal for France

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Gordon Durie shows some slight frustration after his opening goal is disallowed
 
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Big News on the South Coast
A big story comes from the South Coast, as it is announced that Southampton Football Club has been sold to Swedish billionaire Hans Rausing, giving the club quite a bit of money to throw around. What they will do with that money is to be seen.
 
Euro 1996 Quarterfinals
Euro 1996 Quarter Finals recap:

England-Spain: With the Wembley crowd at their back, England seek to win and advance to the semi-final. Alan Shearer gets a first half brace to help, and David Platt scores a third in the second half to give the Three Lions a dominant 3-0 win.

Czech Republic-Portugal: Portugal seeks to reach the semis against the Czechs, but Vladimir Smicer makes it 1-0 for the Czech Republic early. Rui Costa answers on the stroke of halftime, and Figo gives them the lead right out of the dressing room. The Czech Republic try their best to respond, but Portugal's defense holds and sends them into the Semi-final.

Germany-Croatia: No need to spend too long on this one. Germany gets two goals in the first 15 minutes from Fredi Bobic and Markus Babbel. Two more in the second half from Jurgen Klinsmann leads to a 4-0 Germany win. Croatia ends their first Euros poorly, but it is a solid debut to reach the knockouts.
 
A big story comes from the South Coast, as it is announced that Southampton Football Club has been sold to Swedish billionaire Hans Rausing, giving the club quite a bit of money to throw around. What they will do with that money is to be seen.
An earlier move to a new stadium maybe?
 
Everton Moving out, first big Bosman transfer
Everton Football Club announces that they will be building a new stadium, with said stadium to be built and completed in 1999. It will reportedly include an expanded capacity to about 55,000, and a retractable roof. Goodison Park is reportedly scheduled for demolition in 1998, so Everton will play a part of the 1998-99 season at Prenton Park.

Other news includes the first Bosman transfer. The player involved in the historic deal is Paul Lambert, who leaves Motherwell to join reigning Ligue 1 champions Auxerre.
 
1996 Euro semifinals
France-Portugal: This match is the matinee for the England-Germany battle, and France makes sure it won't be a close one. A first half hat-trick from Patrice Loko gives France a 3-0 lead, and a Figo goal doesn't matter, as Les Bleus wins 3-1 and head to the final.

England-Germany: As the two international rivals meet for another tournament, the excitement in Wembley Stadium is palpable. A stalemate is the story of the first few minutes, but Teddy Sheringham fires the first bullet, slipping the ball under Andreas Kopke to give England the lead. Germany attacks a few times, with Mehmet Scholl in particular threatening the English goal, but fails to level the match in the first half. England holds defensively, but grows continuously weary until Thomas Haßler sticks a long shot into the top left corner to even it up. Extra time arrives. England gets the first attack of the period, but Paul Gascoigne hits the crossbar with his shot. Both teams seem to be playing for penalties, but England gets one late corner. The ball gets cleared, but only to Paul Ince, who strikes it on the volley, and sends it past Kopke. 2-1 England, and it's over! England goes to their first international final since 1966. It'll be England-France for the right to be called the best team in Europe.
 
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