Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes VII (Do Not Post Current Politics or Political Figures Here)

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Nothing bad ever happens to the kennedys
 
Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was an American pharmacist and politician who served in the United States Senate, representing Minnesota from 1949 to 1961. As a senator he was a major leader of modern liberalism in the United States, supporting Civil Rights and increased welfare. A divided Democratic Party nominated him in the 1960 presidential election, which he lost to Republican nominee Richard Nixon.

Born in Wallace, South Dakota, Humphrey attended the University of Minnesota. In 1943, he became a professor of political science at Macalester College and ran a failed campaign for mayor of Minneapolis. He helped found the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) in 1944; the next year he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, serving until 1948 and co-founding the liberal anti-communist group Americans for Democratic Action in 1947. In 1948, he was elected to the U.S. Senate and successfully advocated for the inclusion of a proposal to end racial segregation in the 1948 Democratic National Convention's party platform.

Humphrey served three terms in the Senate from 1949 to 1960, and was the Senate Majority Whip for the last four years of his tenure. During this time, he was a lead supporter of civil rights, introduced the first initiative to create the Peace Corps, and chaired the Select Committee on Disarmament. He unsuccessfully sought his party's presidential nomination in 1952.

In 1960 Humphrey launched his campaign for the presidency. Strident in his support of Civil Rights, he received opposition from Southerners within his own party. His focus on primaries and media appearances was novel and helped propel him ahead of rivals such as Lyndon Johnson and John Kennedy.

His strategy succeeded in clinching the nomination, and he chose Senator George Smathers as his running mate. However he faced a walkout led by Orval Fabus. In the general election, he narrowly trailed Nixon's tally in the popular vote but lost the electoral vote by a wide margin. After the defeat, he retired from politics and returned to Minnesota. He would teach at Macalester College in St. Paul until his death in 1978.

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(all text recognizable is from Humphrey's OTL Wikipage)

Hubert Horatio Humphrey Jr. (May 27, 1911 – January 1, 1978) was an American pharmacist and politician who served as the 38th vice president of the United States from 1965 to 1969. He served in the United States Senate, representing Minnesota from 1949 to 1964. As a senator, he was a major leader of modern liberalism in the United States. As President Lyndon B. Johnson's vice president, he opposed the controversial Vietnam War. This breach with the President forced his withdrawal from national politics.

Born in Wallace, South Dakota, Humphrey attended the University of Minnesota. In 1943, he became a professor of political science at Macalester College and ran a failed campaign for mayor of Minneapolis. He helped found the Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party (DFL) in 1944; the next year he was elected mayor of Minneapolis, serving until 1948 and co-founding the liberal anti-communist group Americans for Democratic Action in 1947. In 1948, he was elected to the U.S. Senate and successfully advocated for the inclusion of a proposal to end racial segregation in the 1948 Democratic National Convention's party platform.

Humphrey served three terms in the Senate from 1949 to 1964, and was the Senate Majority Whip for the last four years of his tenure. During this time, he was the lead author of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, introduced the first initiative to create the Peace Corps, and chaired the Select Committee on Disarmament. He unsuccessfully sought his party's presidential nomination in 1952 and 1960. After Lyndon B. Johnson acceded to the presidency, he chose Humphrey as his running mate, and the Democratic ticket won a landslide victory in the 1964 election.

As Vice President Humphrey vocally opposed the Vietnam War from inside the Cabinet, which distanced him from President Johnson. Humphrey became more and more vocal as the term progressed, but failed to convince Johnson to change course. By 1968 Johnson intended to drop Humphrey from his reelection ticket. Humphrey mounted a failed primary bid against Johnson, who would go on to lose to Richard Nixon in the General election. Humphrey was left cut off from his party and retired from politics until his death.

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(all text recognizable is from Humphrey's OTL Wikipage)
 
The Square Deal Coalition: And Now For Something Completely Different
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The 1930 Kansas gubernatorial election was held on November 4, 1930. Part of the 1930 midterms held in the middle of President Theodore Roosevelt Jr.'s first term, it saw independent write-in candidate John R. Brinkley, a radio personality and quack former doctor (who obtained his degree from a diploma mill) known for transplanting goat testicles onto his patients [1], narrowly defeat Republican Benjamin S. Paulen, a former two-term Lieutenant Governor from 1923 to 1927 running with the endorsement of the Democratic Party and support of the KKK; Progressive Charles L. Davidson, a former one-term governor from 1921 to 1923, came in third about 10% behind Paulen and Brinkley, while George McGill of the Catholic-interest Liberty Party [2] managed to carry Catholic-majority Ellis County but otherwise received little support in the state, and won just 5% of the vote, and Socialist J. B. Shields won Crawford County, but only managed to win 4% of the statewide vote, despite an overall banner year for his party nationwide.

The election result, which was controversial given Brinkley's general deal and reason for running (he was effectively running to regain his medical license, which had been stripped from him by the state's medical board, which was appointed by the governor), as well as an attempt to throw out some votes for him [3], was juxtaposed in what were some decidedly mixed results for the Progressive Party nationally. While at the federal level the party unexpectedly succeeded in maintaining their majorities in both Houses of Congress - the most serious challenge to these the party would face between until 1970 - at the state level the party suffered several defeats. The Kansas result, in particular, was shocking, given Brinkley's profile.

William Allen White, the incumbent two-term Progressive governor, was retiring in the election, likely in anticipation of his 1932 Senate run in for the seat of Senator Joseph Bristow, who would retire in the election. In his place, Charles Davidson, who had served a term each as US Representative and Governor, was nominated by the party in his stead. George McGill ran for the still-new Liberty Party, while Benjamin Paulen was the Republican candidate. The Democratic Party, which at this point was rapidly collapsing outside the South, chose not to put up its own candidate but instead endorsed Paulen, likely at the behest of the KKK, which, despite the efforts of President Roosevelt's and Governor White's independent anti-KKK policies designed to combat the organization's domestic terrorism, remained influential in the state and was still attempting to negotiate anti-Progressive alliances between state-level Democratic and Republican parties to advance its bigoted goals, though outside of Indiana and Kansas it had limited success. This move served to unite the two more conservative parties behind Paulen.

This had opened up into a close race between Paulen and Davidson. Davidson was aided by the progressive movement's strength in Kansas - his party had carried the state in 3 of the 4 preceding presidential elections - but had difficulty in dealing with a perception that his party, at the federal level, was neglecting the farm vote, which was suffering acutely since before even the onset of the Great Depression. Paulen, meanwhile, had the united party apparatuses of two parties (though the rapidly weakening Kansas Democratic Party, which would cease competing in the state within the decade, was of less help than it could have been) but struggled to deal with the controversial support the KKK was providing for his campaign. All of this was upended when Brinkley suddenly announced a campaign in September - a date whose lateness which forced him to be a write-in candidate - following the loss of his medical license. Likely running with the intention of appointing members to the Kansas Medical Board in order to regain his license, Brinkley ran one of the most purely demagogic campaigns, offering vague populist promises that appealed to both progressives and conservatives. Thus he is believed to have siphoned votes from both Paulen and Davidson, as well as bringing his own supporters to the polls.

On Election Day, the count was extremely close. Davidson quickly fell behind, and it was soon clear either Paulen or Brinkley would win. There was controversy in the move by state Attorney General Roland Boynton to count only those votes written as "J. R. Brinkley" for Brinkley and to dismiss all other variations of his name. Had this gone unchallenged it would have likely ended in Paulen's victory, but it was and Boynton was forced to allow the counting of all variations of Brinkley's name. It is believed this salvaged the votes of as many as 40,000 Brinkley voters - far more than his 1,171-vote margin.

Governor Brinkley's tenure would as controversial as it was brief, quite frankly exactly what could be expected of a quack doctor elected to high office. He utterly failed to implement any of the policies he had promised to enact, frequently feuded with the legislature, and was impeached, convicted, and removed from office after nine chaotic months over alleged quid pro quos, conflicts of interest, and abuse of power claims regarding what else but his appointments to the state medical board, specifically being accused of making restoration of his medical license a prerequisite to consideration of prospective candidates. Clyde M. Reed, the Progressive candidate for Lieutenant Governor elected alongside Brinkley, succeeded to the office of governor following Brinkley's removal. Disgraced and barred from holding office in the state, Brinkley left for the US-Mexico border, where he ran a radio station until his death several years later.

[1] You can't make this stuff up.
[2] Yeah, I don't love this name (it's derived from the anti-New Deal "American Liberty League," of which Al Smith, the main founding figure of this alt-party, was a member), so I'm taking name suggestions for this party, which is a basically a Catholic/urban interest party that emerges from the north's Democratic Parties as the actual Democratic Party gets a little too close to the KKK, which causes a lot of the north's core Democratic demographics to leave the party and in turn leads to the actual Democratic Party becoming a bit of Southern-interest party, while this is basically the OTL northern Democratic Parties of the 1920's, though somewhat stripped of their most progressive elements.
[3] IOTL Brinkley's name had to be written in a very specific way to be counted for him, and it is possible that the number of votes for him that were thrown out on this technicality may have been enough to give him the win - although likely not by much. According to Wikipedia (because this is a small part of a silly alt-hist project and not a dissertation paper, I think this is a good enough, if of course unreliable, source for the situation), it's estimated somewhere between 30,000 and 50,000 Brinkley votes were thrown out this way. I would have preferred to err on the low side, but that wouldn't have been enough to give Brinkley the win - so I split the baby instead, and gave him the middle place estimate of 40,000 votes.
 
Light of the Nation - Part 1: A Tale of Two Belts

Hubert Humphrey wanted to be President. He wanted it desperately. He had wanted it for years. But he was also dying of cancer. Swallowing his dreams, he sat down with his protégé and allies in the Unions and planned their attack.

But nomination was now a matter for the voters, not smoked filled rooms. Superior organization and establishment support helped Mondale win early primaries, but Mo Udall and, especially, Jimmy Carter provided tougher than expected challenges.

Scoop Jackson’s campaign never really developed. But Carter took the South from George Wallace. This was a problem for Mondale, since Carter had appeal outside the South. Udall faded outside of the west, but still gobbled up delegates there.

However when the race moved North, Mondale quashed his opposition like so many bugs. Every Union Hall from to Buffalo came out for Fritz, and he enjoyed a significant fundraising advantage. Key endorsements like Frank Church helped as well.

A key victory in California both proved his viability in the west, and secured enough delegates to ensure his nomination. It had not been the smoothest road, but he had never fallen behind either.

Mondale accepted the nomination before a raucous NYC crowd.

He had already announced his running mate: Jimmy Carter. Carter was ideal. Mondale’s strongest rival, he added outsider appeal after Watergate, and he could help balance out Mondale’s admitted “Sun Belt Problem.”

The ticket opened with a wide lead over President Ford.

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Light of the Nation - Part 2: Watergate Baby Boom

Mondale enjoyed a post convention bump that saw him peaking at over 60% in polls. Ford, however, pursued an effective campaign that narrowed the polls by Election Day.

In the end, however, it was not nearly enough.

Ford’s strategy was a Rose Garden Campaign that focused on his role as a dignified President, already leading the nation. A steady hand at the tiller. This style was helped by the bicentennial, which provided many photo opportunities to appear Presidential.

His attacks on the Democrats were familiar, tax and spenders who would wreck American prestige abroad. Mondale’s status as Humphrey’s heir spooked old segregationists, and Ford played aggressively south of the Mason-Dixon Line. An ill timed Playboy interview from Carter helped.

However Carter also proved key to unlocking enough Southern Whites to combine with the Black vote to give the Dems a chance in Dixie.

Meanwhile Mondale jetted the country, stumping about progress and a return to dignity. He shook hands in Harlem, kissed babies in Houston.

Inflation and the Nixon Pardon were favorite lines of attack from an efficient Mondale campaign that refused to be complacent. A debate gaffe by Ford claiming that the Soviets were a Christian people hurt him badly with evangelicals. Dole, meanwhile, said Democrats started wars.

The economy improved, but it was not enough to save Ford. Watergate loomed too large in the end Mondale did not quite totally avenge his defeat alongside McGovern. But he came close, and brought with him a wave of new Democrats to Congress.

It was time to govern.

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I'm aware that this may sound like a dumb question but how does one post a wikibox they made in the Wikipedia Sandbox here? Like I've made my very first wikibox through editing the sandbox and want to post it but I'm not sure what to do? Save as on my laptop downloads the page I'm on (Editing Wikipedia:Sandbox) but it changes the font and takes away the box from the wikibox. Do I have to press Publish Changes in the sandbox in order to save it or something like that? I'm really new to this.
 
I'm aware that this may sound like a dumb question but how does one post a wikibox they made in the Wikipedia Sandbox here? Like I've made my very first wikibox through editing the sandbox and want to post it but I'm not sure what to do? Save as on my laptop downloads the page I'm on (Editing Wikipedia:Sandbox) but it changes the font and takes away the box from the wikibox. Do I have to press Publish Changes in the sandbox in order to save it or something like that? I'm really new to this.
  1. You view the wikibox by clicking the "Show preview" button on the editing page
  2. You take a screenshot of the wikibox on the page (You might have to look up how the specifics of doing that for the web browser you're using)
  3. Then you post the screenshot image onto this thread by clicking the "Attach files" button underneath where you'd type out a post and then click insert and full image
 
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