List of German Chancellors 1949-2020

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Tony, Jun 18, 2011.

  1. Tony Tiananmen Ghost

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Location:
    Sandy Island, New Caledonia (before its ISOT)
    Now let's do German Chancellors:D

    Simple rules:
    1. One election (normally once 4 years) per post.
    2. Don't skip into the future, go in order.
    3. If more than 3 fellow members find themselves ninja'd within an hour, please call for your next turn. (Unlikely to happen, right?)

    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
     
    Last edited: Jun 18, 2011
  2. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
     
  3. elyski Version 2.0

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Middle Earth.
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
     
  4. Tony Tiananmen Ghost

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Location:
    Sandy Island, New Caledonia (before its ISOT)
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
     
  5. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
     
  6. Tony Tiananmen Ghost

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Location:
    Sandy Island, New Caledonia (before its ISOT)
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP)
    [1]
    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
     
  7. elyski Version 2.0

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Middle Earth.
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
     
  8. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
     
  9. Tony Tiananmen Ghost

    Joined:
    Dec 29, 2009
    Location:
    Sandy Island, New Caledonia (before its ISOT)
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
    [2]
    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
     
  10. Justin Pickard Schweitzer/Sebelius 2016

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2004
    Location:
    Euroregion Arc-Manche
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)

    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
    [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
     
  11. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)

    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
    [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
     
  12. freivolk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Germany
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)

    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
    [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    __________________

     
  13. black angel Gay-Jew

    Joined:
    Jan 24, 2006
    Location:
    New Hampshire
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)

    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU)
    [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1990: Joschka Fischer (Green/DKP emergency coalition) (5)


    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    (5) NATO Warsaw Pact Nuclear war, largely by passes Germany leaving large numbers of Warsaw Pact troops stranded in Germany, the Greens are the only party willing to work with the occupiers, and the occupiers can rule with out some West German support.


    __________________

     
  14. elyski Version 2.0

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Middle Earth.
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
     
  15. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]
    2000: Joschka Fischer (Democratic Centrist Alliance) [6]

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
    [6] First free election held since the communist regime fell.
     
  16. elyski Version 2.0

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2011
    Location:
    Middle Earth.
    Oh wow I skipped? Didn't notice. Sorry.:eek:
     
  17. hcallega Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 2, 2009
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]
    2000: Joschka Fischer (Democratic Centrist Alliance) [6]
    2003: Gerhard Schroeder (Social Union) [7]

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
    [6] First free election held since the communist regime fell.
    [7] Social Alliance: A left of center party in contrast to the Alliance. Primary focus is on economic growth and unity with Western Europe, rather than green politics and personal liberties.
     
  18. freivolk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Germany
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]
    2000: Joschka Fischer (Democratic Centrist Alliance) [6]
    2003: Gerhard Schroeder (Social Union) [7]
    2007: Karl-Theodor von und zu Guttenberg (Party of National Recovery) (8)

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
    [6] First free election held since the communist regime fell.
    [7] Social Alliance: A left of center party in contrast to the Alliance. Primary focus is on economic growth and unity with Western Europe, rather than green politics and personal liberties.
    (8) The ongoing economic crisis leads to a landslide victory of the right-wing, anti-communist "Partei der nationalen Erneuerung". The Party promise a return to a "true free market economy" and a radical purge of "communist collaborators" from the civil service.
     
  19. EvilSpaceAlien Please clap.

    Joined:
    May 23, 2010
    Location:
    The Great Red North
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]
    2000: Joschka Fischer (Democratic Centrist Alliance) [6]
    2003: Gerhard Schroeder (Social Union) [7]
    2007: Karl-Theodor von und zu Guttenberg (Party of National Recovery) [8]
    2011: Frank-Walter Steinmeier (Social Union)

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
    [6] First free election held since the communist regime fell.
    [7] Social Alliance: A left of center party in contrast to the Alliance. Primary focus is on economic growth and unity with Western Europe, rather than green politics and personal liberties.
    [8] The ongoing economic crisis leads to a landslide victory of the right-wing, anti-communist "Partei der nationalen Erneuerung". The Party promise a return to a "true free market economy" and a radical purge of "communist collaborators" from the civil service.
    [9] Due to the PNR's complete failure in revitalizing the German economy, or promote any significant job growth, they are ousted in what is a landslide election for the Social Union.
     
  20. freivolk Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Germany
    1949: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1953: Erich Ollenhauer (SDP)
    1957: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1961: Konrad Adenauer (CDU)
    1965: Gustav Heinemann (SDP)
    1970: Günter Guillaume (SDP) [1]
    1974: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1978: Helmut Schmidt (SDP)
    1981: Helmut Kohl (CDU) [2]
    1983: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP) [3]
    1987: Dietrich Stobbe (SDP)
    1989: Herbert Mies (DKP) (4)
    1997: Frank Tommler (German Revolutionaries)[5]
    2000: Joschka Fischer (Democratic Centrist Alliance) [6]
    2003: Gerhard Schroeder (Social Union) [7]
    2007: Karl-Theodor von und zu Guttenberg (Party of National Recovery) [8]
    2011: Frank-Walter Steinmeier (Social Union)
    2015: Karl-Theodor von und zu Guttenberg (Party of National Recovery)

    [1] Heinemann resigns as leader of the SDP in 1969 after an assassination attempt, but he continues serving his remaining term as Chancellor. His deputy, Vice Chancellor Günter Guillaume wins the 1970 election and becomes Chancellor.
    [2] The Schimidt government loses a no-confidence motion after the Free Democratic Party withdraws from the coaltion.
    [3] After Kohl and his allies shot down Franz Josef Strauss' bid for the Chancellory as joint CDU/CSU candidate in 1981, the CSU withdraws its support from Kohl's government. In 1983, the CDU fields candidates in Bavaria. In retaliation, the CSU joins the nascent Greens in providing confidence-and-supply for the former Mayor of West Berlin.
    (4) 1989 Warsaw Pact troops occupy West Germany. After leaving NATO in 1984 and a defense-politic of "strukturelle Nichtangriffsfähigkeit", the west-german Goverment sees resistance as futile. Under pressure of the occupation forces DKP-chairman Herbert Mies is appointet chancellor.
    [5] The USSR and most Warsaw Pact nations fell in 1992, with only Germany and Yugoslavia remaining Communist. Yugoslavia fell apart to Civil War in 1995 with Italy, Austria, Hungary, Romania. Bulgaria, and Greece all annexing large parts of the war torn region. In 1997 Germany, the last bastion of Communism in Europe, fell to revolutionaries.
    [6] First free election held since the communist regime fell.
    [7] Social Alliance: A left of center party in contrast to the Alliance. Primary focus is on economic growth and unity with Western Europe, rather than green politics and personal liberties.
    [8] The ongoing economic crisis leads to a landslide victory of the right-wing, anti-communist "Partei der nationalen Erneuerung". The Party promise a return to a "true free market economy" and a radical purge of "communist collaborators" from the civil service.
    [9] Due to the PNR's complete failure in revitalizing the German economy, or promote any significant job growth, they are ousted in what is a landslide election for the Social Union.
    __________________