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timelines:nations_lands_of_red_and_gold

Lands of Red and Gold : Nations and ethnicities

All of the entries are listed in alphabetical order. If you haven't read Lands of Red and Gold yet, consider this page a minor spoiler.

NOTE: This page is a work in progress. Please remain patient while we try to list and describe all the nations relevant to the TL. Remember, you can always speed up the process by volunteering in the timeline's main thread.


1. Native Australian and Oceanian nations

Atjuntja - The founders of the first advanced society in southwestern Australia (particularly the fertile area around Perth and its vicinity), they at first borrowed from the more advanced cultures of the southeast, but gradually developed their own, if isolated civilization. One of their main contributions to the evolution of native Australian technology was their discovery of iron-working. It came into being as a necessary substitute for copper and tin based metallurgy, due to the poor reserves of those two mineral resources within the region. They are important trading and poltiical partners of the Nangu sailor culture.

Bungudjimay -

Gunnagal - The first ever Australian civilization. It evolved from various tribes and ethnicities living along the main watercourse of the Murray, Australia's greatest river. The ancestors of the Gunnagal occupied the same area that was settled in OTL by the Wemba-Wemba people. Though the ancient Gunnagalic empires collapsed by the 8th and 9th century AD, some of their original core monarchies (e.g. the Kingdom of Tjibarr) survive well into the 17th century AD and even come into contact with some European explorers of the era (particularly Dutch conquistadors fleeing the Yadji armies).

Junditmara - The first ever sedentary civilization of Australia, orginating in OTL southeastern Victoria. The earliest ancestors of the Junditmara emerged with the first basics of agriculture already about 6000 years BC. Peculiarly, their agriculture was not about domesticating and harvesting plants and animals, but about building networks of artificial dams, weirs and fish ponds at rivers and streams, filling the ponds with sea or river eels and other fish. These fish would then be regularly harvested once they grew large enough. While the Junditmara didn't completely abandon a hunter-gatherer lifestyle, they had a steady enough supply of meat in their region and became settled enough to use stone in the construction of their dwellings and to trade with many different tribes far and wide (usualy exporting smoked fish meat). Around 2500 BC, the ideas about raising fish in ponds were adopted by tribes along the Murray river and helped influence the further development of true agriculture in the region. This eventually led to the rise of the Gunnagal, the first advanced civilization of native Australians. As for the Junditmara, their later descendants in the first millenium BC and first millenium AD became partially assimilated by the offshoots of the original Gunnagal culture, but also received new knowledge on the farming of plants and keeping of domesticated animals. The Junditmara are based on the OTL Gunditjmara people from the same basic area. After the fall of the Watjubaga Empire, the remnants of the old Junditmara first evolved into the Empire of the Lake and later into the larger and more multiethnic Yadji Empire.

Kiyungu - inhabitants of the central-to-north eastern coastal strip of Australia. The were the first Australian natives to receive and use Maori crops, such as kumara (sweet potatoes) and taro.

Kurnawal - The Imperial Period of Gunnagalic culture coincided with the colonisation of Tasmania. Seafaring techniques amongst Gunnagalic peoples were not an early specialty, but their technology slowly improved. In time, this led to the colonisation of the Bass Strait islands, then, in the ninth century AD, the settlement of Tasmania itself. Tasmania was colonised by two distinct groups of peoples: The Tjunini who entered via King Island in the northwest, and the Kurnawal, who first colonised Flinders Island in the northeast, then Tasmania itself. The Tjunini settled most of the northern coast. The Kurnawal were initially established along the north-eastern coast, but after the War of the Princess (which would become immortalised in song), were driven to the eastern coast. The central highlands and rugged western coast of Tasmania were initially left to the native hunter-gatherer inhabitants, the Palawa. Tasmania has rich reserves of tin, which were quickly exploited. The Tjunini and Kurnawal made more extensive use of bronze than anywhere else in Australia, and they also exported considerable quantities of tin back to the mainland. Tasmania in 1618 remained divided between the descendants of the Tjunini and the Kurnawal. Their long rivalry had divided much of the island between them, except for the spurned areas of the central highlands and south-western coast, where the Palawa have by then developed a hunter-gardener lifestyle. The territorial and cultural conflicts between the Tjunini and the Kurnawal have produced two states with clearly-defined borders and patrolled frontiers. It has also meant that both peoples possess a strong sense of nationalism. In their language, their culture, their fashion, and their diet, the inhabitants of Tasmania define themselves as citizens of either the Tjunini confederation or the Kurnawal kingdom. It is often a mortal insult to suggest to a Tjunini that they act like or a Kurnawal, or vice versa. Their rivalry is not just cultural, but over land and trade. The best tin mines lie in the region of the disputed frontier, and the two nations have fought a seemingly endless series of wars over control of that region, and over other valuable agricultural land. Tasmanian tin and gum cider are held in high regard on the mainland, although neither of the two kingdoms conducts much in the way direct trade. The export of goods to and from the mainland is usually controlled by the Nangu (Islanders).

Mutjing -

Nangu - Known to outsiders as “Islanders”. They are inhabitants of OTL Kangaroo Island who have taken the Polynesian navigational package (see “Tangata”) and adapted it to the conditions of the Southern Ocean. The Islanders regularly voyage from the Atjuntja dominions in the west to Tasmania in the east, and occasionally beyond; their trading ships sometimes reach the coastal cities of southern New South Wales. North of the Island lies the Eyre Peninsula, a small fertile patch of land bounded by sea and northern deserts. This land is occupied by several city-states who have a loose alliance to defend each other against the expansionistic powers further east.

Nuttana -

Palawa - With their etnonym identical to the OTL one, the Palawa are the original natives of Tasmania, the first settlers of the island. They are descendants of mainland Australian natives who settled Tasmania via a land bridge during the last ice age, later becoming isolated once sea levels rose again worldwide, terminating Tasmania's peninsular status. Unlike in OTL, the Palawa weren't spared of outside contact with their more advanced northernly cousins from across the sea. Reestablishment of contact with mainland civilizations brought not only trouble, but advances as well (for one, the Palawa adopted the invention of the bow and readopted the knowledge to handle fire on a regular basis). Tasmania in 1618 remained divided between the descendants of the Tjunini and the Kurnawal. Their long rivalry had divided much of the island between them, except for the spurned areas of the central highlands and south-western coast, where the Palawa have by then developed a hunter-gardener lifestyle.

Patjimunra -

Raduru - The Raduru are a small coastal nation/ethnicity from the eastern coastline of Australia, specifically the OTL Illawarra region of New South Wales. Mostly farmers and herders, they are slightly less economically developed and inhabit small towns, often lightly fortified. They are fairly isolated from other neighbouring cultures and nationalities (with which they nevertheless trade in some capacity). The first contact between native Australians and Maori sailors occured thanks to this culture.

Tangata - Meaning “the people”, this is one of the early Maori iwis (tribes/ethnicities), specifically from the northern coast of New Zealand's North Island (just north of OTL Auckland, their home is on the Kaipara Harbour). They are mostly hunting moa at this point, and hunting them out of the northern areas, and hence having to sail further and further south to find more. In 1310 AD, only some 20-30 years after the first settlement of New Zealand, a group of voyaging Maori fishermen belonging to the Tangata discovered the eastern coast of Australia while on an exploratory mission. They landed in the OTL Illawarra region on the coast of OTL New South Wales and met the Raduru. The initial contact was wary, but peaceful. An exchange of crops, animals and ideas followed over the next few decades. The Maori obtained Australian crops such as red yams, wattles and murnong, and animals such as the emu and the wood duck. The Maori also learned about new technologies such as metallurgy and ceramics. The Australian peoples gained new crops such as kumara (sweet potato), taro and New Zealand flax. They also received new inspiration in sailing and navigation techniques, first from individual Maori who settled on the eastern coast, and then from diffusion of ideas.

Tjunini - The Imperial Period of Gunnagalic culture coincided with the colonisation of Tasmania. Seafaring techniques amongst Gunnagalic peoples were not an early specialty, but their technology slowly improved. In time, this led to the colonisation of the Bass Strait islands, then, in the ninth century AD, the settlement of Tasmania itself. Tasmania was colonised by two distinct groups of peoples: The Tjunini who entered via King Island in the northwest, and the Kurnawal, who first colonised Flinders Island in the northeast, then Tasmania itself. The Tjunini settled most of the northern coast. The Kurnawal were initially established along the north-eastern coast, but after the War of the Princess (which would become immortalised in song), were driven to the eastern coast. The central highlands and rugged western coast of Tasmania were initially left to the native hunter-gatherer inhabitants, the Palawa. Tasmania has rich reserves of tin, which were quickly exploited. The Tjunini and Kurnawal made more extensive use of bronze than anywhere else in Australia, and they also exported considerable quantities of tin back to the mainland. Tasmania in 1618 remained divided between the descendants of the Tjunini and the Kurnawal. Their long rivalry had divided much of the island between them, except for the spurned areas of the central highlands and south-western coast, where the Palawa have by then developed a hunter-gardener lifestyle. The territorial and cultural conflicts between the Tjunini and the Kurnawal have produced two states with clearly-defined borders and patrolled frontiers. It has also meant that both peoples possess a strong sense of nationalism. In their language, their culture, their fashion, and their diet, the inhabitants of Tasmania define themselves as citizens of either the Tjunini confederation or the Kurnawal kingdom. It is often a mortal insult to suggest to a Tjunini that they act like or a Kurnawal, or vice versa. Their rivalry is not just cultural, but over land and trade. The best tin mines lie in the region of the disputed frontier, and the two nations have fought a seemingly endless series of wars over control of that region, and over other valuable agricultural land. Tasmanian tin and gum cider are held in high regard on the mainland, although neither of the two kingdoms conducts much in the way direct trade. The export of goods to and from the mainland is usually controlled by the Nangu (Islanders).

Yadji - Named for their ruling dynasty, the Yadji are the descendants of the old Junditmara. With relatively rain-drenched lands and fertile soils, the Yadji dominions stretch from south-eastern South Australia and almost all of modern Victoria south of the Great Dividing Range, as far as East Gippsland. The Yadji are a rigidly hierarchical society bound by conventions of religion and tradition, and their government is among the most organised in Australasia. Trade contact via the Islanders has recently acquainted them with the arts of working in iron. They are particularly adept at building roads to allow swift transport between the key regions of their empire. Only in the north and north-west do they face serious opposition from the kingdom of Tjibarr, which relies on riverine control of the Murray to fend off the military advances of the Yadji. Hence the major rivalry between the two polities/nations.

Yaora -


2. European, North American, Asian and other nations

Bavaria -

Cavendia -

England -

The Holy Roman Empire -

Japan -

Lorraine -

New England -

The Netherlands -

Portugal -

Spain -

Tygeria -


See Also

timelines/nations_lands_of_red_and_gold.txt · Last modified: 2017/06/04 03:43 by petike