Your Personal Pop Culture Utopia timeline

My idea is to have the Peanuts comic strip last until August 31st, 2010 as Schulz lives longer like in "As Dreamers Do". Schulz chose to retire due to both his health problems and due to his weakening skills. The Complete Peanuts still starts in 2004 and ends at Volume 31 in Early 2019 with Volume 30 including the entirety of the Lil' Folks strips.

Adding to that, I would've love to have seen a 1990s Peanuts cartoon.
 
Venus is what many science fiction stories imagined it to be: a life-sustaining planet with a rich ecosystem that humans can colonize. This obviously would've had broader ramifications for space travel, biology, geopolitics, and our views of the universe and our place in it.

But imagine the ramifications for pop culture if the dream of settling on another planet comes true, along with being able to discover and study an extraterrestrial biosphere. You'd see an explosion of sci-fi and pop culture, with "Venus punk" probably becoming a genre.
 
What if film was invented earlier in the 19th century (1888 IOTL), with the first motion picture recorded say in the 1860s or 1870s, how could this impact the future history of movies and technology?
 
What if film was invented earlier in the 19th century (1888 IOTL), with the first motion picture recorded say in the 1860s or 1870s, how could this impact the future history of movies and technology?
Wouldn't be very expensive as far less silver because less china reparations?
 
Sky Ferreira never signs to a major label and releases Masochism in 2015 and subsequent albums in 2019 and 23 and is known for her punctuality at shows.
 
But imagine the ramifications for pop culture if the dream of settling on another planet comes true, along with being able to discover and study an extraterrestrial biosphere. You'd see an explosion of sci-fi and pop culture, with "Venus punk" probably becoming a genre.
Rather, the further the study of Venus advances, the more the motives for its exploration will migrate from science fiction to adventure literature. Considering that there are fewer and fewer unexplored territories on Earth, and many have an ambivalent relationship with old adventure stories (due to the context of the Colonial Era), we can expect a revival of the genre (given that the passion for adventure has not gone away).
 
Rather, the further the study of Venus advances, the more the motives for its exploration will migrate from science fiction to adventure literature. Considering that there are fewer and fewer unexplored territories on Earth, and many have an ambivalent relationship with old adventure stories (due to the context of the Colonial Era), we can expect a revival of the genre (given that the passion for adventure has not gone away).

That's a good point.

So, could you see a series of traveler's tales, the most famous of which was Gulliver's Travels, on the Venusian surface? In addition, would you also see Western movies or a version of Coral Island taking place on Venus? What about cartoons with the main characters being the creatures that dwell on Venus?

Of course, if outright settlement of Venus becomes feasible, would you see these adventure stories dying down as the wonder and splendor of Venus' mystery vanishes?
 
So, could you see a series of traveler's tales, the most famous of which was Gulliver's Travels, on the Venusian surface? In addition, would you also see Western movies or a version of Coral Island taking place on Venus? What about cartoons with the main characters being the creatures that dwell on Venus?
Depends on the manner in which colonization will take place.
Of course, if outright settlement of Venus becomes feasible, would you see these adventure stories dying down as the wonder and splendor of Venus' mystery vanishes?
It will take at least 100 years to colonize another planet.
 
Depends on the manner in which colonization will take place.

It will take at least 100 years to colonize another planet.

Maybe this is a complicated question, but if a habitable Venus had been discovered in the 1960s, would the Space Agencies have moved heaven in Earth in developing technology that would allow people to move there?

What would be the earliest date for an astronaunt going to Venus himself?
 
The issue is that it feels like space travel investments kind of slowed after the Moon Landing. Would a healthy and viable Venus have led to a world in which space travel and presumably other forms of tech is more advanced?
The presence of a Venus on which humans could comfortably live would probably inspire more investment into space colonization yes, but beyond that we really can't know what kind of world it would be, too many butterflies.
 
The presence of a Venus on which humans could comfortably live would probably inspire more investment into space colonization yes, but beyond that we really can't know what kind of world it would be, too many butterflies.

Fair point.

But if Venus was discovered to be a colonizable planet, you could divide Venusian fiction into several eras ITTL in the broadest of strokes:

1. The "Pulp" Era (1930s-1950s): Like OTL, most fiction set on Venus would be those wild fantasy stories of dinosaurs, Venusian Amazon women, and giant dinosaur-like monsters. The clouds covering Venus meant that the planet would still be little more than a drawing board for silly stories rather than serious speculative fiction. This era wouldn't be too different from OTL, but the key distinction is this: OTL astronomers had already figured out that the Venusian atmosphere was filled with CO2, which meant that scientists like Carl Sagan had already determined that Venus was too hot to have life. TTL, scientists would instead find an atmosphere filled with oxygen and water, which would lead to a scientific community excited to find out what's under the clouds.

2. The "Probe" Era (1960s-1980s): Once the probes ITTL determined Venus was capable of supporting life and brought back pictures, you'd see the emergence of slightly more grounded stories featuring battles over who got to own Venus, cowboy-like Westerns over potential Venusian settlers, depictions of whatever flora and fauna existed on the planet in everything from cartoons to plushes, but combined with a level of excitement over the continued exploration of Venus' surface.

In a non-pop culture tangent, you'd also see the emergence of the entire field of science regarding Venus. Everything from biology to geology would have new branches about Venus, how to settle it, and how its resources can be harnessed.

3. The "Casual" Age (1990s-Present): By the time we probably know the broad strokes of the planet, satellites would give astronomers a basic outline of the surface, and at the very least, a brave astronaut has been in orbit around Venus and back. However, the fiction around Venus would die down since the planet's existence would go from being exciting to just another fact of life. People would go from being excited about pictures of Venusian creatures to being bored at their appearance.

The key fact is even with a more significant investment in space tech, settling a planet is F*CKING expensive. The amount of money needed to send anything to Venus wouldn't be made up by finding Venusian oil. So, the depictions of Venus would die down as the economic realities set in, and would remain this way until the mid-21st century when the technology for colonizing Venus becomes cheaper and more feasible.
 
Fair point.

But if Venus was discovered to be a colonizable planet, you could divide Venusian fiction into several eras ITTL in the broadest of strokes:

1. The "Pulp" Era (1930s-1950s): Like OTL, most fiction set on Venus would be those wild fantasy stories of dinosaurs, Venusian Amazon women, and giant dinosaur-like monsters. The clouds covering Venus meant that the planet would still be little more than a drawing board for silly stories rather than serious speculative fiction. This era wouldn't be too different from OTL, but the key distinction is this: OTL astronomers had already figured out that the Venusian atmosphere was filled with CO2, which meant that scientists like Carl Sagan had already determined that Venus was too hot to have life. TTL, scientists would instead find an atmosphere filled with oxygen and water, which would lead to a scientific community excited to find out what's under the clouds.

2. The "Probe" Era (1960s-1980s): Once the probes ITTL determined Venus was capable of supporting life and brought back pictures, you'd see the emergence of slightly more grounded stories featuring battles over who got to own Venus, cowboy-like Westerns over potential Venusian settlers, depictions of whatever flora and fauna existed on the planet in everything from cartoons to plushes, but combined with a level of excitement over the continued exploration of Venus' surface.

In a non-pop culture tangent, you'd also see the emergence of the entire field of science regarding Venus. Everything from biology to geology would have new branches about Venus, how to settle it, and how its resources can be harnessed.

3. The "Casual" Age (1990s-Present): By the time we probably know the broad strokes of the planet, satellites would give astronomers a basic outline of the surface, and at the very least, a brave astronaut has been in orbit around Venus and back. However, the fiction around Venus would die down since the planet's existence would go from being exciting to just another fact of life. People would go from being excited about pictures of Venusian creatures to being bored at their appearance.

The key fact is even with a more significant investment in space tech, settling a planet is F*CKING expensive. The amount of money needed to send anything to Venus wouldn't be made up by finding Venusian oil. So, the depictions of Venus would die down as the economic realities set in, and would remain this way until the mid-21st century when the technology for colonizing Venus becomes cheaper and more feasible.
I feel like the realization that another planet in the solar system is fully capable of supporting human life would have such profound impacts on culture and politics that these sorts of predictions are basically just 100% conjecture. For one the development of space technology would happen very differently, so some of the eras would likely happen earlier or later. For all we know such a TL would see, IDK, a strong "we must seed the solar system" religious movement get its grips on society in the 90s for example, so the casual age ends up being very uncasual indeed.

That is not to say that your ideas are inherently implausible, if I read these in a TL I would not question it, but we really can't say "this is how pop culture would go".
 
2. The "Probe" Era (1960s-1980s): Once the probes ITTL determined Venus was capable of supporting life and brought back pictures, you'd see the emergence of slightly more grounded stories featuring battles over who got to own Venus, cowboy-like Westerns over potential Venusian settlers, depictions of whatever flora and fauna existed on the planet in everything from cartoons to plushes, but combined with a level of excitement over the continued exploration of Venus' surface.

In a non-pop culture tangent, you'd also see the emergence of the entire field of science regarding Venus. Everything from biology to geology would have new branches about Venus, how to settle it, and how its resources can be harnessed.

3. The "Casual" Age (1990s-Present): By the time we probably know the broad strokes of the planet, satellites would give astronomers a basic outline of the surface, and at the very least, a brave astronaut has been in orbit around Venus and back. However, the fiction around Venus would die down since the planet's existence would go from being exciting to just another fact of life. People would go from being excited about pictures of Venusian creatures to being bored at their appearance.
The problem is that even after all this research, people will still have a very basic understanding of Venus, so even when the outlines of the continents are known, the details of the living world will only be at a very basic level, and therefore Venus still looks like an attractive curiosity (oversaturation is another matter market, but this is still not a strong decline).
 
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