Your Personal Pop Culture Utopia timeline

Yeah, that makes sense with Frollo.

I wouldn't call Buck Cluck a villain. A jerk, sure, but he ain't evil. I did see the deleted scenes of him being a nicer father.

Yes, but because of the Internet, Buck has been subjected to the "Ron the Death Eater" treatment as a sadistic monster whom Stalin would loathe.

It's not how I feel about him, but how so many others do. Nostalgia Critic compared the Chicken Little world to "Man in the High Castle."

Blaxploitation James Bond movies.

James Bond, M, Moneypenny, they're all Black. And they're fabulous.

I think Idris Elba would be a good fit. One of my male co-workers described him as a "man crush." He could play Black Bond to a hilt.

But would that contribute to the fan theory that Bond isn't one person but an alias countless agents have taken up over the years?
 
Classic Nostalgia Critic.

Granted, that's part of Nostalgia Critic's character, so to speak, but there is a reason "Jerks Are Worse Than Villains" is a trope: mundane abuses of power seem more enraging than fantastical villains since the mundane is something we encounter. As someone once said, the majority of us don't encounter Voldemort, but we do encounter an Umbridge in our lives.

Despite the Boys having characters like Homelander, the character I loath the most is Blue Hawk since someone like him would exist even without powers.
 
But would that contribute to the fan theory that Bond isn't one person but an alias countless agents have taken up over the years?
Is that even a fan theory at this point? I thought it was all but confirmed.

Despite the Boys having characters like Homelander, the character I loath the most is Blue Hawk since someone like him would exist even without powers.
For me it was stormfront. Not just because she was a nazi, there was something deeply enraging about her whole fake grrrl power persona.
Although I must say I've always had a fondness for the more mundane kinds of villains. I've been in numerous fandoms where my favorite character was the one that drove much of the rest of the fandom downright feral with rage.
 
Is that even a fan theory at this point? I thought it was all but confirmed.
Nope but the continuation writers treat that the 007 number did mean something special for the bonds (ie the family) as trigger mortis treat both his parents were spies but who was the 007 was the mystery
 
For me it was stormfront. Not just because she was a nazi, there was something deeply enraging about her whole fake grrrl power persona.
Although I must say I've always had a fondness for the more mundane kinds of villains. I've been in numerous fandoms where my favorite character was the one that drove much of the rest of the fandom downright feral with rage.

Stormfront is a close second, but like Blue Hawk, she is also that racist asshole having way too much power for comfort.

And yes, her pretensions of social advancement make her downright infuriating. She used the name "Liberty" for the purposes of extrajudicial murder. I feel like she was deliberately mocking American ideals while cloaking her evil under the banner of Americanism!
 
My personal pop culture utopia is that Hazbin Hotel releases earlier as intended in the summer of 2023 with more recorded episodes, and Helluva Boss’s Unhappy Campers episode had more of a focus on the relationship between Barbie and Blitzo, with Moxxie being more well written.
 
Nope but the continuation writers treat that the 007 number did mean something special for the bonds (ie the family) as trigger mortis treat both his parents were spies but who was the 007 was the mystery
My headcanon for this is that there has never been multiple James Bonds, but rather that each time a new actor is casted the timeline shifts slightly. For example, in License to Kill, Leiter mentions that Dalton's Bond once married someone who was killed, an obvious reference to On Her Majesty's Secret Service, but this creates an issue: Lazenby was 30 when OHMSS released in 1969, and Dalton was 43 when LtK was in 1989. This means that either Dalton's Bond had OHMSS in 1969 or that it instead occurred in 1976 (when The Spy Who Loved Me released, funnily enough). I think the latter seems more likely and that all of Bond's adventures, up until Casino Royale reset the timeline, were set on a shifting timeline dependent on the actor's age.
 
And yes, her pretensions of social advancement make her downright infuriating. She used the name "Liberty" for the purposes of extrajudicial murder. I feel like she was deliberately mocking American ideals while cloaking her evil under the banner of Americanism!
I see it in a slightly different way. In the series, the point is that she is a convinced Nazi but uses a "progressive" image for the public - I initially thought it was a stupid idea, until the thought occurred to me. This may be one of the elements that screams corporate hypocrisy - especially the “Woke” part (the only case where this word is appropriate). The fact is that now inclusion and representation are being talked about by those who have been pushing it for many decades - and moreover, directly or indirectly exploited whose “representation” they lay claim to. Although I’m probably exaggerating - after all, corporate leaders are pragmatic.
 
I see it in a slightly different way. In the series, the point is that she is a convinced Nazi but uses a "progressive" image for the public - I initially thought it was a stupid idea, until the thought occurred to me. This may be one of the elements that screams corporate hypocrisy - especially the “Woke” part (the only case where this word is appropriate). The fact is that now inclusion and representation are being talked about by those who have been pushing it for many decades - and moreover, directly or indirectly exploited whose “representation” they lay claim to. Although I’m probably exaggerating - after all, corporate leaders are pragmatic.

You are on the mark about the phoniness of corporate activism. I think how Ashley treats Maeve's sexuality as a marketing tool is a really rotten example of this.

But I think Stormfront reflects the political pretentiousness of fascism and reactionary politics. Stormfront presents the image of rebellion and authority, but in reality, she just wants that authority for herself and gives her followers a shallow feeling of affecting change.

Stormfront and Blue Hawk's very existence underscores how even when Vought seemingly does something good, it is often disingenuous and self-serving.
 

Stretch

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One show that I haven't seen talked about as something that needed more respect/the chance to properly finish, but should be, is Detentionaire.
 
A surviving multicultural Ottoman Empire.

Reading about the Ottoman Empire, I am surprised at its massive diversity and cultural production. While we shouldn't pretend the Ottoman Empire had ever been a multicultural and egalitarian paradise, it also surprises me to read that once upon a time, it was an Ottoman Sultan who rescued Jews, albeit for economic reasons.

And in the 19th century, there was an Ottomanism movement to construct a multicultural Ottoman Identity among its various peoples. While this ultimately didn't pan out, I dislike that the result of that decline is an ultranationalist Turkey that seemingly stifles its own ethnic diversity rather than embrace it. If Ottomanism did work, one wonders what great art a multicultural Ottoman society would've produced.
 
also donate to the irish

That was a big surprise to me as well, as well as the idea that the Ottomans also had a strange tolerance of homosexuality, albeit in a "don't ask, don't tell" kind of way.

Could the Ottomans have ever reformed themselves and used their oil revenues to improve the lives of peoples in their empire, or was it inevitable the Ottomans would've collapsed from things like inter-ethnic rivalry and Dutch disease?
 
That was a big surprise to me as well, as well as the idea that the Ottomans also had a strange tolerance of homosexuality, albeit in a "don't ask, don't tell" kind of way.

Could the Ottomans have ever reformed themselves and used their oil revenues to improve the lives of peoples in their empire, or was it inevitable the Ottomans would've collapsed from things like inter-ethnic rivalry and Dutch disease?
Nothing is inevitable plus besides Jannisary fuckery, ottoman biggest issue was European imperialism, especially Russian and British one
 
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