YEAFT: What can Argentina get instead of Veinticinco de Mayo?

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by Jukra, Jan 8, 2019.

  1. Jukra Well-Known Member

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    Now, YEAFT stands for Yet Another Falklands Thread, but WI Argentina decides that buying an aircraft carrier in late 1960's is not the optimal route for naval striking power and something else might be bought instead?

    What would be the options? Other used warships - those B and C have to be outmatched! Buccaneers and (say) Atlantiques for naval strike and ASW?
     
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  2. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    HMS Eagle for irony points.

    They could probably get Lexington or a Midway class but its not really an improvement over 25th of May.

    If Forrestal is damaged worse I could see them buying it, but I doubt the ship will be looked after very well.
     
  3. Vanguard45 Well-Known Member

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    A missile cruiser and spend the money that would've been used on the carrier and its planes on bomb maintenance?
     
  4. Jukra Well-Known Member

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    Now, these are noble suggestions and might damage Argentine Navy even worse than Veintecinco De Mayo, but I specified no carriers! (or at least tried with my English)
     
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  5. Jukra Well-Known Member

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    The timeframe is in late 60's, maybe ex-USN Providence-class cruiser (Cleveland class CLG-conversion) but with different missiles?
     
  6. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    Oops, misunderstood you there! Now what would be interesting is an Iowa ending up in the not-so-capable hands of the Argentine Navy.
     
  7. Vanguard45 Well-Known Member

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    That is way too expensive for any nation save the US or USSR at the time.

    And yes Jukra, that is what Im thinking of. Focus on a intergrated fleet structure supported by the air
     
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  8. DaveB Well-Known Member

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    No, an Alaska, obviously.

    [OOC: ducks for cover and stares wildly around looking out for Calbear’s vengeance]
     
  9. Vanguard45 Well-Known Member

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    Remove the 12 inch guns and replace them with missiles.
    Alaska Missile Massacre
     
  10. Guilherme Loureiro Member

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    If there were three complete Alaskas, I'd say that would be a possibility, sell one of each to Argentina, Brazil and Chile, mirroring what they did with the Brooklyn/St. Louis-class CLs.
     
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  11. juanml82 Well-Known Member

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    Is there something that can replace the strike power of an aircraft carrier in the 1960s? Cruise missiles are still many years away and so is the Harrier. The only alternative I can think is some ship with heavy artillery to fight Chile in the constricted waters of the Magellan Strait, but that does nothing against Brazil.
    As for land based air power, did the West had something to perform long range maritime strike? Even the Soviet Tu-22M didn't enter service until late 1960s/1970s. Missile technology isn't there yet during the time a replacement for ARA Independencia would be discussed and long range bombers would be felt as the domain of the Air Force rather than the Navy.

    EDIT: An alternative procurement would be if there is no Latin American debt crisis so the Argentine economy is in better shape in the 1980s. 25 de Mayo's engines break down by the late 1980s, as in OTL, and a replacement or an alternative to a carrier based fleet is discussed during the early 1990s, when there are plenty of other options available: Russian bombers, missile armed surface combatants or missile armed submarines
     
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2019
  12. Aphrodite Well-Known Member

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    We have to understand that Argentina was ruled by juntas- coalitions of the armed forces. Each service gets to spend its share of the budget anyway they see fit. So if we cut out the carrier, the navy is spending it. Their best bet would be submarines but that would disrupt the internal politics of the Navy- more submarines mean less promotions for Surface Warriors.

    So more destroyers would be your next best option and the more likely one
     
  13. Ramontxo Believes San Mames is Heaven Donor

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    Argentina Lancasters are replaced by a squadron of Victors. Instead of a old carrier la Armada de la República Argentina gets three squadrons of Buccaneer and one of Nimrod and a couple of 82 cruisers for flagships...
     
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  14. Jukra Well-Known Member

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    But for how long range are you supposed to strike? Buccaneer, for example, had combat radius of some 800NM's, with air-to-air refuelling further, are you really supposed to be able to project farther from Argentine shores? Early on, you could have iron bombs like Skyhawks with ASM's further on the road from late 1970's. An Orion or Atlantique would be able to recce any targets via ESM and radar much farther out.

    Besides, land-based air is much cheaper than carrier based one.

    As for surface combatants, Veintecinco de Mayo lists some 1200 person crew. One could man, say, four Darings modernized a la Peruvian model, or two Tre Kronor's or one ex-USN CL for that crew, if you're seeking for used alternatives.
     
  15. juanml82 Well-Known Member

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    As far as a carrier can. In a war with Chile, that's not much of an issue, since all of Chile is in range from Argentine land based aircraft. In a war with Brazil, a carrier allows the Argentine Navy to engage the Brazilian one far away from the Argentine shores (though admittedly, I don't know what plans the Argentine Navy had for a war against Brazil)

    The Buccaneer would be a good choice, but I think it would be seen as Air Force material - interservice rivalry played a part in procurement options @Aphrodite said. Plus, there is the issue of pride/arrogance/jingoism: would the Argentine admirals want to replace a carrier with land based air power at a time when Brazil had a carrier of their own? And I don't think the military thought cost was much of an issue (at least within reason) - I doubt they were concerned with being efficient in the use of public funds.
     
  16. Derek Pullem Butterfly Killer Donor

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    Either Blake or Tiger for the irony.
     
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  17. CV12Hornet Well-Known Member

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    Snag a couple of new-build Kynda-class missile cruisers from the Soviets?
     
  18. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    Buy the Vanguard for more irony?
     
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  19. GDIS Pathe Well-Known Member

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    Wasn’t the Argentine Junta rabidly anti communist?
     
  20. NOMISYRRUC Putting a banging donk on it!

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    It's not ironic in the slightest.

    In addition to the Colossus class aircraft carrier Independencia the Argentine Navy of the late 1960s still had both Brooklyn class cruisers and the training cruiser La Argentina. It's conceivable that HMG would be willing to sell Blake and Tiger's sister ship Lion to Argentina as two Type 42 destroyers were sold to Argentina at about the same time.

    The Swedes sold their cruiser Göta Lejon to Chile and the Dutch sold both their De Zeven Provinciën class cruisers to Peru. The Argentine Government might be able to use the money saved on not buying 25 de Mayo to outbid the Chilean and Peruvian governments for one of those.