WW1 Royals: Did they have rationing?

This is a weird question that I had, and might be too low-effort, but, here goes...

I know that during WW1 and WW2, when rationing was introduced, the British Royal Family received ration cards, and followed rationing just like everyone else (nominally, at least, I've seen anecdotes about food being brought in from farms on their estates and whatnot), but they lived in a country that was never at any threat of starvation, where agricultural output and public nutrition actually got better over the war.

My question is, in WW1, with the monarchies that were starved into defeat (Russia, Austria-Hungary, Germany), where the rations were not enough to sustain the population (for a variety of reasons, the transport system breaking down under the strain of war, blockade, etc), did their royal families also have rationing? Like with people like Tsar Nicholas, Kaiser Wilhelm , or Blessed Karl, did they do something like the British royals did, and at least pretend to go along with it, and get food shipped in secretly, or did they not do anything like this at all? (Since their situations were different, they would starve like everyone else if they obeyed their rationing policies.)

I'm asking because I'm curious, and can't find any English-language sources that talk about it. Do you guys know anything?
 
I greatly doubt that the tsar did anything with rationing. The imperial family had pretty luxurious lifestyle through the war.
 
I don't know about the Hapsburgs personally but there was a serious scandal in Austria and Bohemia in 1918 about the major aristocratic landowners having dodged rationing and continued to live the high life.
 
There was historically a big rural/urban divide with farmers and farm owners being able to ignore the ration schemes in most countries.

I would presume that the Royals in question all owned farms that provided their own supply of off ration food.
 
I always figured that in Continental Europe, the common folk took it as a given that the royals were exempt from rationing and never asked questions.
 
There was historically a big rural/urban divide with farmers and farm owners being able to ignore the ration schemes in most countries.
I expect that, officially or unofficially, there was a recognition that anyone who owned productive land would take what they needed from that land for their own use. That was the logic behind the 'victory gardens' in WW2 Britain, at least, and it's hard to see whoever was sent to check up on Wood Farm being too fussed about whether their flock had 247 lambs or 248 this year... especially when Mrs Jones serves up such a fantastic shepherd's pie, and there is a shortage of veterinary medicine...
 
In WW2 rationing in Britain was primarily a system to ensure that everyone had (just) enough to stay fit and healthy to be able to do war work. If you had money and you could find extra food you could eat better, just as you could eat your home grown food or chickens and eggs (though I think chickenfeed could be bought using ration coupons in place of egg rations). BBC radio a few years back had a good series on WW2 rationing in Britain, with a bit on Germany for comparison.

WW1 rationing would have lacked the prior experience and also been less well supported with knowledge of food science.

Either way, I'm pretty sure that, rationing or not, royals in WW1 (and 2) would not have been short of money nor of people willing to supply, and also would have had access to estates and gardeners for home grown food.
 
My question is, in WW1, with the monarchies that were starved into defeat (Russia, Austria-Hungary, Germany), where the rations were not enough to sustain the population (for a variety of reasons, the transport system breaking down under the strain of war, blockade, etc), did their royal families also have rationing? Like with people like Tsar Nicholas, Kaiser Wilhelm , or Blessed Karl, did they do something like the British royals did, and at least pretend to go along with it, and get food shipped in secretly, or did they not do anything like this at all? (Since their situations were different, they would starve like everyone else if they obeyed their rationing policies.)

I'm asking because I'm curious, and can't find any English-language sources that talk about it. Do you guys know anything?
I have found some information about rationing by the German and Russian royals during World War I.

From "The Last German Empress" by John Van der Kiste. I do not know the page number because I have this book on Kindle but the quote is from this book's Chapter 6 “The First World War, 1914-18”.
Last German Empress said:
“As food rationing and fuel shortages throughout Germany became more prevalent, the petitions that the Empress received from charities, church parishes and hospitals increased. The Emperor was at headquarters, and she now found herself becoming the public face of the monarchy at home. She moved her family out from the Stadtschloss into Bellevue Palace, which enabled her to save money on utilities, staff and general maintenance costs.

She saw it as her responsibility to set an example for a less lavish lifestyle during the war, and anything that savoured of luxury was banished from the table. Moving to Bellevue also enabled her to spend more time with the family of the Crown Prince ((hers and the Kaiser’s eldest son)), while he was commanding the Fifth Army….

…At the same time she continued to maintain a simple domestic routine for her family in Berlin. She spent her evenings by the fireside, knitting clothes for the soldiers, making arrangements to care for the wounded or the widowed, otr taking tea with her ladies.”
From “The Kaiser And His Times” by Michael Balfour PP. 357 – 358
Michael Balfour said:
“Descriptions of court diet differ. While some writers recall pea soup, sausage and cheese, others mention banquets and the frequent consumption of champagne in celebration of victories, real or supposed. There is certainly nothing to show that William himself insisted on luxurious living. If he was capable of saying, while in the act of consuming buttered rusks and pastries, that he always observed the same rationing regulations as his subjects, the explanation for this apparent hypocrisy is likely to have been unawareness of what his subjects were actually eating.

In any case a number of influential guests from abroad had not only to be entertained but given the best possible impression of Germany in wartime. Messing officers are apt to think they will be judged by the quality of their table and use the name of their chief to secure, by hook if not by crook, the best available; ‘fair shares’ is not an idea which comes naturally to court officials. Dona ((the German Empress)) had in this as in many other things an unfortunate influence; she thought it part of her duty to cherish her husband and keep him capable of filling the role which everyone made out to be so important.”
From “The Other Battleground : The Home Fronts: Britain, France and Germany 1914 – 1918” by John Williams, page 160.
John Williams said:
“Like King George V and President Poincaré, [Kaiser Wilhelm II] was setting an example in frugal living. With the Empress, he had been one of the first to adopt the German war bread and make other economies, including the abandonment of elaborate court functions.”
“The Last Kaiser” by Tyler Whittle, page 273, has one item about concerning one Russian royalty effort to set a rationing example.
Tyler Whittle said:
“The Kaiser’s other cousin, Tsar Nicholas, who seemed doomed to make mistakes, spent part of his time getting in the way of his generals and part with his family at Tsarskoe Selo entirely cut off from everyone else. He too set an example by giving up vodka and he issued a ukase prohibiting its sale to speed up mobilization. As vodka was a government monopoly he thereby cut off a third of the national income and the ukase had to be rescinded.”
 
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