Wrapped in Flames: The Great American War and Beyond

And so the name of McClellan shall forevermore be a cursed name, for his part in this shall not be forgiven.
The economy is in tatters, the casualties enormous, and you've been at war for four years and probably have three more on the horizon. We, in OTL, know that the Civil War was winnable. But on the ground right now in TTL the prospect looks bleak. Think of the shit storm that would have erupted if he had reneged on the Louisville agreement and saw a bunch of inconclusive engagements for another year.
 
Once again McClellan proving that he can fumble even something like a peace conference.

But hey, the author said he will be remembered as a mid president so at least he(or rather, his cabinet) will do something right, right?
Or the future presidents are just that much worse, which I could see if they do start becoming tyrants or something like that.
 
@EnglishCanuck This must be one of your best-written chapter! That idea of a funeral procession was brilliant, I geniunely felt the sorrow of the people reading through that part. The whole continent is going to be shaken by that war and in the former United States, New England more than any other place, I think, will never be the same.

No matter how happy I felt when the Yanks were finally pushed out of Canada back in 1864, I could not help but feel disdain at the behavior of the delegates during the conference. Torpedoing the Great Republic on accounts of bigotry and self-preservation. But given how short-sighted politicians are, this sh*tshow is eerily realistic...

McClellan can go to hell, Lincoln will get thrown into the sewers as well given the context but Georgy B. is the one responsible for the death of the Union.

Now let's see how the house stands...
 
@EnglishCanuck This must be one of your best-written chapter! That idea of a funeral procession was brilliant, I geniunely felt the sorrow of the people reading through that part. The whole continent is going to be shaken by that war and in the former United States, New England more than any other place, I think, will never be the same.

No matter how happy I felt when the Yanks were finally pushed out of Canada back in 1864, I could not help but feel disdain at the behavior of the delegates during the conference. Torpedoing the Great Republic on accounts of bigotry and self-preservation. But given how short-sighted politicians are, this sh*tshow is eerily realistic...

McClellan can go to hell, Lincoln will get thrown into the sewers as well given the context but Georgy B. is the one responsible for the death of the Union.

Now let's see how the house stands...
On the other hand, the first post state that the US becomes a powerhouse by the dawn of the 20th century, and there are the New Men who would shape the US so things can still look up.
 
On the other hand, the first post state that the US becomes a powerhouse by the dawn of the 20th century, and there are the New Men who would shape the US so things can still look up.
Oh yes, the US will bounce back, I know. And I'm sure at some point I will once again be sheering against them!

It is just the way the McClellan administration capitulated over the conference is frankly shameful. I bet ITTL historians will have some strong words for his presidency.
 
It is just the way the McClellan administration capitulated over the conference is frankly shameful. I bet ITTL historians will have some strong words for his presidency.
True, but given what has happened, this might be the best choice he has else he might even see the Western US form the Pacific Republic if he continues. Who knows, his fumbling of the conference might serve as a wake-up call for him.
 
McClellan really lived out the 'the risk I took was calculated, but I'm bad at maths' meme, didn't he? We still haven't seen the full impact, but blundering into a peace on such a scale because he just didn't grasp how politics works is quite an accomplishment in and of itself. Now, we'll see if both sides can actually reach terms and what McClellan can do to learn from this. If he will.
 
And so the name of McClellan shall forevermore be a cursed name, for his part in this shall not be forgiven.

His name is going to be dragged through the mud in the 19th century. I'm sad to say that the mid-20th will see a bit devoted to his rehabilitation. Some deserved, some not so deserved.

And it all began from a single carriage accident...

Truthfully I probably piled some things on too thick in that opening chapter, but that was not one of those things. It all spiraled out of control so fast...
 
As expected, McClellan bitterly disappoints me. And I already expected disappointment. It's just... Presidents not having clear control over their subordinates, allowing them to lead the President instead of the other way around, it's a terrible amateur mistake, yet one we often saw in history. It makes complete sense given McClellan's temperament and inexperience, but it's still a disaster for the Union.
 
Now that could be an interesting thing to see realized.

Interestingly enough, my research over the years went from seeing this as a dead end to something that would probably crop up again post war. In the 1860 election the Republicans won by barely 730 votes, and still more people voted for the Democrats. In 1868 Grant won by an even slimmer margin, making me think that the 1864 results of OTL were more because California was so detached from the war and Lincoln himself was personally popular.

Imagining a scenario where California and Oregon (plus Washington) are all on the front lines, at the far end of the continent, and getting the stuffing knocked out of them made me think that Lincoln and the Republicans would be a lot less popular, and the peace platform much more acceptable.

Post-war there will be a very real (and somewhat justified) feeling that the Pacific was left to wither while all the fighting happened in the east. Now you ask someone what Lincoln could really do about that and you'll get much grumbling and not many concrete answers beyond "something" or another such phrasing. So Western Alienation will be a big problem between Washington and the Pacific states as they feel they're not connected to the Atlantic coast, whether politically, economically, or even physically as the transcontinental railroad is going to be a little late getting going.
 
Yeah, but with peace, it might end up petering out again. It depends on the Reconstruction period but given how this story goes, it might really happen.

More like a "Deconstruction Era" really...

Also, does this mean the US recognizes the Confederacy or is this peace more like a ceasefire similar to North and South Korea?

At the moment, more like a ceasefire. There's about to be a final nail in the coffin of any intransience however.

I also realized that the Louisville Convention has established a precedent that if the states want to secede, they can just do that in another convention of the states. With how the war turned out badly for the Union, such an idea can materialize to avoid a ruinous war when they can have peace but still work together. I fear we won't have a United States from coast to coast in the future but more a collection of nations where the continental US is located.

Ostensibly, yes. McClellan's blithe assumption that he was commanding some unified coalition really hoisted him by his own petard. However, the more politically astute around him just might realize that this is a terrible thing to have floating around and may want some Constitutional brakes on the process. It's a big issue post-war, and one which we will see more of before the end of the 1860s. The implications are not lost on anyone with a bit of foresight.
 
The economy is in tatters, the casualties enormous, and you've been at war for four years and probably have three more on the horizon. We, in OTL, know that the Civil War was winnable. But on the ground right now in TTL the prospect looks bleak. Think of the shit storm that would have erupted if he had reneged on the Louisville agreement and saw a bunch of inconclusive engagements for another year.

As in so much else, the perception of a conflict is often as important as the material reality. McClellan probably could have continued the war, Lee's army was only getting back up to OTL 1863 levels by TTL 1865, while the armies in the West would have been slightly stronger. The biggest problem was the fledgling Confederate navy that now had real teeth, whereas OTL it was no threat to the USN. With a USN that has, with some exceptions, spent much of 1862-63 getting its butt kicked by the RN, it has more experience but has also lost a lot of good officers and ships in action.

McClellan looked at the task ahead and blinked is the assessment that we should see. He was of course encouraged by political rivals, but he also just didn't have the guts to continue the war to the bitter end with all the consequences for the economy that would bring.

Hell, I've been crunching the numbers of the dead for the war and if the war continued into 1866 we'd probably see a death toll of 900,000 - 1,000,000 officially rather than the 600,000 of OTL. Not that it isn't higher already.
 
Ok, even as a white guy, the fact that America would sooner break apart then empower black voters isn't surprising.

Well it's more that a cabal of the worst Democratic leaders was able to get together and realize that they suddenly had the power to increase their own domestic powerbase by excluding a potential future Republican base. They theorize that they can whip up domestic support against abolitionist sentiment, while thinking that they can steer the rudder of state back towards 1860.

1868 is going to prove everyone wrong.

What a great world to be an American...

For now, for now. There's some hope spots on the horizon I can tell you.

Christ, this is going to be a dystopian timeline for a lot of minorities.

For some yes, for others not so much.

Small spoiler is that there are some Native peoples who will have a slightly longer time in the sun thanks to the war, but African Americans will not have their rights enshrined in law until the early 20th century at the federal level.

On a darker note, guess what constitutional amendment isn't passed in 1865?
 
Something tells me that Proto facism is going to happen in America and also there will be the northern version of the KKK (probably both racist and also ones that hate hate southerners) that would do terristism on the south because if they take down the politicians there in their mind it will make the south fall
 
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