Winfield Scott resigns/dies before the Civil War...who is his replacement?

Serious question, but I guess it does depend ion whether he dies or resigns. He was mid-70s at the start of the Civil War and massively overweight, so I assume a death can plausibly be created, but what if he resigns instead.

Who is next in Line as commander in Chief. Is it Robert Patterson? Or do they reach down the line and go for Robert E Lee or Joseph E Johnstone or Albert Sidney Johnstone?
 
I believe the next in rank was John Wool. He was old too, but he was as vigorous as a man in his mid 70s can be. His experience was grossly underused early in the war, then was shunted aside.
 

HJ Tulp

Donor
I believe the next in rank was John Wool. He was old too, but he was as vigorous as a man in his mid 70s can be. His experience was grossly underused early in the war, then was shunted aside.
Just read his Wiki-page. It seems to me that Lincoln had it in for him, 'rewarding' excellent work with practical demotions. Any reason for that?
 
I am not sue the reason. Since I never read a particular reason, I always assumed it was something personal between Lincoln and Wool. Since that was not Lincoln's style, and Lincoln had a collossal ability to take slights, it had to have been bad. If that is what it was.

Hopefully, someone on the board knows the answer. I have always wanted to know.
 
I am not sue the reason. Since I never read a particular reason, I always assumed it was something personal between Lincoln and Wool. Since that was not Lincoln's style, and Lincoln had a collossal ability to take slights, it had to have been bad. If that is what it was.

Hopefully, someone on the board knows the answer. I have always wanted to know.
Perhaps he was past it.Took Lincoln years to find right general.
 
This John Wool looks like the right guy for the job. Maybe this time him and Lincoln would not have a spat and he would get to command the Army . He most likely would have the right commanders in place . Who knows a shorter war?
 

HJ Tulp

Donor
I am not sue the reason. Since I never read a particular reason, I always assumed it was something personal between Lincoln and Wool. Since that was not Lincoln's style, and Lincoln had a collossal ability to take slights, it had to have been bad. If that is what it was.

Hopefully, someone on the board knows the answer. I have always wanted to know.
It's strange though, Lincoln is there when Wool does excellent work at Norfolk, gives him a promotion and then gives him an assignment far away from the front. If they had beef, would he get a promotion?
 
I don't know if they were rivals. They had served together since the War of 1812. Wool seems to have served under Scott with no issue in Mexico, and Scott was a prickly commander. I don't think Wool took Pillow's side in the post Mexican War controversy. They may have had issues, but if they did, they were unusually discrete about it.
 
I am not sue the reason. Since I never read a particular reason, I always assumed it was something personal between Lincoln and Wool. Since that was not Lincoln's style, and Lincoln had a collossal ability to take slights, it had to have been bad. If that is what it was.

Hopefully, someone on the board knows the answer. I have always wanted to know.
It wasn't that Lincoln and Wool had any problems personally. Rather, it was a matter of age. Wool was two years older than Scott, and considering the stresses of active command in the massive war that the American Civil War devolved into, as well as the surplus of available qualified candidates Lincoln had to call on if he so choose, it is little surprise that the 77-year old Wool was given lighter duties. In any case, you can hardly blame Lincoln for not having 20/20 hindsight of someone's potential abilities to command well.
 
It wasn't that Lincoln and Wool had any problems personally. Rather, it was a matter of age. Wool was two years older than Scott, and considering the stresses of active command in the massive war that the American Civil War devolved into, as well as the surplus of available qualified candidates Lincoln had to call on if he so choose, it is little surprise that the 77-year old Wool was given lighter duties. In any case, you can hardly blame Lincoln for not having 20/20 hindsight of someone's potential abilities to command well.
I thought it had to be more than age. Lincoln always seemed an "any tool in the shed" type of leader. Even at his most frustrated point, and looking for anyone to take the AotP command, he had Wool available. Competent, energetic, a ton of seniority. OK, he is old, but that seemed to be his only downside. He would have been in the perfect position to take the AotP on the Peninsula from his post at Ft. Monroe. But Lincoln shunted him aside.
 
I agree with others that there was definitely something else going on in regards to General Wool. I don't know if he and Lincoln had beef, or if there were others disuading Lincoln from using Wool but there had to be more reasons for why Wool was essentially thrown away. He was definitely a wasted asset in my opinion. I also agree that had Winfield Scott died early, Wool is a very good option to turn to. Which makes one wonder what his plan would have been for the Civil War compared to Scott's Anaconda Plan.
 
As I read the OP the issue is Scott retiring or dying BEFORE the Civil War, and I take that to be months before, not immediately before Fort Sumter. So it's Buchanan's choice and his Sec of War until the end of 1860 is none other than the Virginia secessionist John Floyd. Hmmm? Given the nature of the army then there were few plausible choice and Wool would be next in line but would Floyd push for a Southron Brigadier like David Twiggs to get the post? Anyway, would the lack of Scott butterfly away the Anaconda Plan?
 
Floyd was trying to sabotage the potential Northern war effort. If I am in his shoes, I can't think of a better man to choose than William Harney.
 
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