WI US Socialists get 10% in 1912

Those votes will be geographically concentrated and result in more red dog catchers elected.
So... a national Union of Animal Controllers? Joking aside, if that did happen it could have an affect on legal precident for the right of collective action by public workers, resulting in a stronger and earlier consolidation of things like teacher's unions.
 
Or simply a greater number of labour fakirs and the development of captive authorised unions as per Australian Labourism.

My suspicion is that red electorates are linked with states that also have fairly well developed large modern capitalist firms. Which could cause a transition to labourist / anti-labourist electoral politics in these states *if* the American movement survives the war.

It’ll almost certainly involve ratting a militant union movement: that’s what labour fakirs sell capital, a cheaper way to cut the balls off the industrial movement. That and labour peace.

I don’t think US capital is anymore likely to go for that than one big union.
 
Victor Berger might be re-elected in WI-05. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=47014

Meyer London just might win in NY-12 but I doubt it. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=231681 (The Progressive candidate Henry Moskowitz probably got a lot of "advanced" reform voters who might otherwise have voted for London. London did get elected in 1914.)

Three other Socialists who could conceivably have been elected to Congress in 1912:

(1) In the other Milwaukee district. WI-04, Socialist Winfield L. Gaylord finished twelve points behind Democratic incumbent William J. Carey. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=370179

(2) The Berkeley-Oakland district in California, which decades later would elect Ronald Dellums to the House (as a Democrat, though he eventually became vice-chair of Democratic Socialists of America) in 1912 came within 13.7 points of electing a Socialist Party candidate to Congress: Berkeley Mayor J. Stitt Wilson got 40 percent against incumbent Republican Joseph Knowland (William Knowland's father). https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=137374

(3) Schenectady's Socialist mayor, George R. Lunn, got 22.07 percent of the vote in NY-30, not too far behind the victorious Republican Samuel Wallin and the Democrat R. E. "Lee" Reynolds. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=724100 Lunn would eventually be elected to Congress as a Democrat.

For more on Gaylord and Wilson and Lunn see https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Winfield_R._Gaylord https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J._Stitt_Wilson
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_R._Lunn
 
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GeographyDude

Gone Fishin'
We avoid imprisoning Debs during WWI and the “Red Scare” afterwards? ?

There was a scary period after the War with some jackass “anarchist” sending letter bombs which had the effect of course of simply increasing the forces of authoritarianism.

If we can avoid and/or lessen all this, we’re a better country.
 
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Morris Hillquit took one-fourth of vote in 1917 New York Mayoral Election, maybe he could do better and win.

Oh, there were all sorts of Socialists who came close to winning major office at various times, but I was speaking of those who might have been helped in 1912 by a larger Debs vote.

If we're talking about plausible Socialist successes in years other than 1912, the most obvious would be Victor Berger getting elected to the US Senate from Wisconsin in 1918. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=46931 Or Ashley Grant Miller getting elected to the Senate from Nevada in 1916. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=36481 Or Jasper McLevy getting elected Governor of Connecticut in 1938. https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...evy-socialist-governor-of-connecticut.392171/

Or my favorite: future CPUSA leader Charles Ruthenberg getting elected Mayor of Cleveland in 1917 one day before the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia! https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...es-e-ruthenberg-elected-mayor-in-1917.407671/
 
Oh, there were all sorts of Socialists who came close to winning major office at various times, but I was speaking of those who might have been helped in 1912 by a larger Debs vote.

If we're talking about plausible Socialist successes in years other than 1912, the most obvious would be Victor Berger getting elected to the US Senate from Wisconsin in 1918. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=46931 Or Ashley Grant Miller getting elected to the Senate from Nevada in 1916. https://www.ourcampaigns.com/RaceDetail.html?RaceID=36481 Or Jasper McLevy getting elected Governor of Connecticut in 1938. https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...evy-socialist-governor-of-connecticut.392171/

Or my favorite: future CPUSA leader Charles Ruthenberg getting elected Mayor of Cleveland in 1917 one day before the Bolsheviks seized power in Russia! https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...es-e-ruthenberg-elected-mayor-in-1917.407671/
In 1918 you could also have Leo Krzycki, Edmund T. Melms, Morris Hillquit, Scott Nearing & Abraham I. Shiplacoff all elected as representatives. Oscar Ameringer probably still couldn't be elected if he ran for the same district, but he could win Berger's district if Berger focused on winning the Senate campaign. That would mean 2 Senators (Miller & Berger) and 10 representatives (London, Gaylord, Wilson, Lunn, Krzycki, Melms, Hillquit, Nearing, Shiplacoff & Ameringer) for the Socialist party of America in 1919.
Wiki links: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leo_Krzycki, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edmund_T._Melms, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Hillquit, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scott_Nearing, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abraham_I._Shiplacoff, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oscar_Ameringer
 
What would be the substantive impact of a somewhat stronger Socialist Party in the 1910's in both domestic and foreign policy, if anything? Assuming the Russian Revolution still happens roughly as per our timeline, could they withstand the First Red Scare?
 
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