In 1848, Zachary Taylor's men offered the Vice-Presidency to legendary Massachusetts Senator Daniel Webster. Yet Webster declined, and Fillmore was given the position instead. It would be Fillmore, not Webster, who ascended to the Presidency upon Taylor's death in July 1850. What if Webster had taken up Taylor's offer, and he had become President in 1850?
 
Whatever Webster’s ambition, it’s doubtful he’ll have much time to pursue it, considering his death in 1852. That would inspire plenty of chaos at the time, and plenty of questions for us. Who takes Webster’s place when he dies? How out of hand might things get with the succession unclear and the slavery issue looming?
 
Whatever Webster’s ambition, it’s doubtful he’ll have much time to pursue it, considering his death in 1852.

Webster died because he was thrown off his horse while riding around his property in Massachusetts. If he is President in 1852, it's reasonable to assume that his OTL death will be butterflied away.
 
Webster died because he was thrown off his horse while riding around his property in Massachusetts. If he is President in 1852, it's reasonable to assume that his OTL death will be butterflied away.

Funny, I always thought it was cirrhosis — a number of sources say as much — but it seems like the cirrhosis just made the fall more deadly, if it was related at all.

So you’re right, the fall itself is definitely butterflied. Still, he was definitely not in good health and had been suffering from serious liver problems for years. If Daniel makes it to 1852, he’ll be at death’s door, and the stress of the office won’t help. Given his personality, I have no doubt he’d run for re-election, but he probably wouldn’t see his term through if he won.

I’m still not sure how much he’ll be able to get done from 50-52. He’ll try his damndest and might even do a decent job, but his sharp tongue definitely didn’t help him reach across the aisle. I have a feeling he’d push for major reforms, but without the mandate that comes with actually winning an election, I’m not sure much would come to fruition. He would rile up his opposition like crazy, though—whatever Webster’s fate after becoming President, we might even be seeing an earlier secession crisis.
 
Funny, I always thought it was cirrhosis — a number of sources say as much — but it seems like the cirrhosis just made the fall more deadly, if it was related at all.

So you’re right, the fall itself is definitely butterflied. Still, he was definitely not in good health and had been suffering from serious liver problems for years. If Daniel makes it to 1852, he’ll be at death’s door, and the stress of the office won’t help. Given his personality, I have no doubt he’d run for re-election, but he probably wouldn’t see his term through if he won.

I’m still not sure how much he’ll be able to get done from 50-52. He’ll try his damndest and might even do a decent job, but his sharp tongue definitely didn’t help him reach across the aisle. I have a feeling he’d push for major reforms, but without the mandate that comes with actually winning an election, I’m not sure much would come to fruition. He would rile up his opposition like crazy, though—whatever Webster’s fate after becoming President, we might even be seeing an earlier secession crisis.

I think he'd support the Compromise of 1850, pushing the measure to passage in Congress, but his unpopularity with anti-slavery Whigs combined with his declining health would probably mean he loses in 1852 - either at the convention (like Fillmore) or in the general election. That said given Webster's foreign policy background he might be more ambitious in that arena than Fillmore.
 
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