WI: Megatech Software never went out of business in the 90s?

For those who aren't familiar with a bit of anime fandom history, Megatech Software was the first licensor of anime games in the United States of America. Unlike JAST USA, Megatech usually reformulated their games instead of directly porting it during translation of Japanese video games. In the early days of the anime fandom, it was exciting to see anime-styled video games on the PC to be introduced in the United States.

Unfortunately, the anime games released by Megatech Software was full of flaws and problems. This include slapdash translations, poor graphics at the time of PC games with better graphics, awkward censorship and other things. Megatech Software released only four games - Cobra City, Metal & Lace, Knights of Xentar (Dragon Knight III), and Power Dolls - before folding somewhere between 1997 and 1999.

Afterwards, the only licensors of anime games in the United States of America were JAST USA and Hirameki International along with other transient fan translators. Even then, Hirameki International exited the anime game market in the United States, leaving JAST USA as the only licensor until MangaGamer and other major corporations entered the market during the sudden popularity of anime games in the 2010s decade.

What if Megatech Software never folded and continued to translate and reformulate anime games? The main purpose of the thread is to explore an alternate timeline as well provide research and material for TBA timeline.
 
For those who aren't familiar with a bit of anime fandom history, Megatech Software was the first licensor of anime games in the United States of America. Unlike JAST USA, Megatech usually reformulated their games instead of directly porting it during translation of Japanese video games. In the early days of the anime fandom, it was exciting to see anime-styled video games on the PC to be introduced in the United States.

Unfortunately, the anime games released by Megatech Software was full of flaws and problems. This include slapdash translations, poor graphics at the time of PC games with better graphics, awkward censorship and other things. Megatech Software released only four games - Cobra City, Metal & Lace, Knights of Xentar (Dragon Knight III), and Power Dolls - before folding somewhere between 1997 and 1999.

Afterwards, the only licensors of anime games in the United States of America were JAST USA and Hirameki International along with other transient fan translators. Even then, Hirameki International exited the anime game market in the United States, leaving JAST USA as the only licensor until MangaGamer and other major corporations entered the market during the sudden popularity of anime games in the 2010s decade.

What if Megatech Software never folded and continued to translate and reformulate anime games? The main purpose of the thread is to explore an alternate timeline as well provide research and material for TBA timeline.
Sounds like an interesting timeline. Sounds like they would have done work for multiple different companies especially Nintendo.

Edit: I see this company making work for Fire Emblem and Kid Icarus for the Super Nintendo.
 
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reformulate anime games
I think this was the real reason their undoing, tampering the source code and delay the game release means a lot of decent games become obsolete or less impressive vs the western computer market, plus i think the Otaku market wasn't there at the time sadly
 
I think this was the real reason their undoing, tampering the source code and delay the game release means a lot of decent games become obsolete or less impressive vs the western computer market, plus i think the Otaku market wasn't there at the time sadly
Maybe doing contract work with other companies would have helped until the Anime boom in the 90s?
 
awkward censorship
Why didn’t they do the ratings, like T for Teen and M for Mature?

This fellow boardgamer I knew a little who worked at a local Houston movie theater said the movies which are really popular with the younger teens are the PG-13 movies which look and feel like they’re R-rated movies [a lot of violence, one F-bomb relatively early, etc, etc]
 
Why didn’t they do the ratings, like T for Teen and M for Mature?

This fellow boardgamer I knew a little who worked at a local Houston movie theater said the movies which are really popular with the younger teens are the PG-13 movies which look and feel like they’re R-rated movies [a lot of violence, one F-bomb relatively early, etc, etc]
The ESRB, the main content rating board for video games, only reviewed and rated console video games at the time. PC games at the time were not subject to the ESRB, hence the lack of ratings on the cover. For example, the later installments of Leisure Suit Larry and Quake initially lacked ESRB ratings upon its release in the 1990s, only receiving a retroactive rating of M by the ESRB after being re-released.

Megatech Software heavily censored Japanese PC games because in the original versions, these were adult games that contained nudity and explicit content. To get the basic idea, Leisure Suit Larry would be a bawdy PG-13 film, the Japanese PC games that Megatech imported would receive a hard R-rating or NC-17 rating. Megatech Software had its own in-house rating system, consisting of All Ages, NR-13, and NR-17.
 
The ESRB, the main content rating board for video games, only reviewed and rated console video games at the time. PC games at the time were not subject to the ESRB, hence the lack of ratings on the cover. For example, the later installments of Leisure Suit Larry and Quake initially lacked ESRB ratings upon its release in the 1990s, only receiving a retroactive rating of M by the ESRB after being re-released.

Megatech Software heavily censored Japanese PC games because in the original versions, these were adult games that contained nudity and explicit content. To get the basic idea, Leisure Suit Larry would be a bawdy PG-13 film, the Japanese PC games that Megatech imported would receive a hard R-rating or NC-17 rating. Megatech Software had its own in-house rating system, consisting of All Ages, NR-13, and NR-17.
I can see Megatech Software being a second party developer for Nintendo for the Famicom Detective Club series since it contains gory and detailed shots of crime scenes. Megatech Software also seems to be good with RPGs which would benefit the Big N with series like Earthbound/Mother.
 
I can see Megatech Software being a second party developer for Nintendo for the Famicom Detective Club series since it contains gory and detailed shots of crime scenes. Megatech Software also seems to be good with RPGs which would benefit the Big N with series like Earthbound/Mother.
I don't think Megatech Software would be a second party developer, though. The company specialized in importing, translating and reformulating Japanese PC games, not console games. However, they could do subcontracting work for Nintendo, albeit under a different name since Nintendo at the time tend to be pretty strict in terms of content and licensing restrictions.
 
I don't think Megatech Software would be a second party developer, though. The company specialized in importing, translating and reformulating Japanese PC games, not console games. However, they could do subcontracting work for Nintendo, albeit under a different name since Nintendo at the time tend to be pretty strict in terms of content and licensing restrictions.
That sounds fitting. Just have them hold out subcontracting for Nintendo until the 90s anime boom then give them bigger projects like DBZ.
 
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