WI Jordan renamed to Palestine Jordan renamed to Palestine

Jordan, before its independence in 1946, was just the eastern part of Palestine. A couple of years later, during the Arab-Israeli War, it nabbed the West Bank and eventually annexed it.

WI the Jordans upon annexing the West Bank change the name of the whole country to Palestine. Just that, everything else until that political statement goes as IOTL.
Effects?
 
Some other term arises for the stateless people we call Palestinians OTL, perhaps?

Can't see it being that big a deal, unless policy is different in some way that would make this more than a name change.
 
Actually, Jordan was seperately administered by Abdullah from the start as the autonomous region of the Transjordan. Afterwards, by retaining the name Jordan rather than becoming Palestine the Kingdom illustrated that it did not claim Israeli territory and was not a seperate homeland for the Palestinians either, and so maintained unusually freidnly relationships with Israel.

Of course, it was a bit more complicated. From 1948 till 1967 Hussein I attempted to unify the country's inhabitants by utilising the policy that 'Jordan is Palestine and Palestine is Jordan', trying to persuade people that despite the longstanding division the existence of the state of Israel was a fact that had to be accepted, and so Jordan was the next best thing to a unified Palestinian republic, and as Jordan would be under the Hashemites. After 1967 Hussein increasingly moved to a 'Jordan is Jordan and Palestine is Palestine' due to Israeli attempts to push 'Jordan is Palestine' by urging the Palestinians to revolt and declare their republic in Jordan, thus allowing Israel to claim that they didn't need to evacuate the West Bank as an independent Palestinian homeland already existed. Hussein meanwhile was moving rapidly to offering the West Bank as a heavily autonomous region within Jordan, before eventually, and somewhat reluctantly, giving his claims to the PLO and washing his hands of the whole matter with a somewhat pointed remark to Israel that they had managed to force the one state that they would have been able to openly negotiate with out of the equation.
 
From 1948 till 1967 Hussein I attempted to unify the country's inhabitants by utilising the policy that 'Jordan is Palestine and Palestine is Jordan'
A good catch phrase but not as powerful as renaming the whole country. I was wondering how would the power of semantics work.
Throughout the years people would start associating "Palestine" with being related to that state that encompasses both sides of the Jordan river and not necessarily just those Arabs that live under Israel (or Egypt in Gaza). A separate Palestine identity (as IOTL) would have troubles to stand out under that name.
 
Some other term arises for the stateless people we call Palestinians OTL, perhaps?

Can't see it being that big a deal, unless policy is different in some way that would make this more than a name change.
Probably so.
I don't know however what else could the Transjordans have done to their Cisjordan counterparts. Cisjordan Palestines were given citizenship and proportional representation.
 
Absolutely nothing as Yasser Arafat or someone like him will demand a Palestinian state for Palestinians. It just pushes Black September up sooner.
 
A good catch phrase but not as powerful as renaming the whole country. I was wondering how would the power of semantics work.
Throughout the years people would start associating "Palestine" with being related to that state that encompasses both sides of the Jordan river and not necessarily just those Arabs that live under Israel (or Egypt in Gaza). A separate Palestine identity (as IOTL) would have troubles to stand out under that name.
Part of the problem was that Transjordan had already been shortened to Jordan in everday speech for the last 20 years, partially it's an issue that outside the West Bank, Palestinians formed a minority until the refugees were pushed across in '67, and the Hashemite monarchy owed support to non palestinian groups such as the bedouins and circassians who lived in that region, partially Israel was very touhy at the time about the use of the term Palestine, and it's very likely that they'd have seen it to be a claim over the entire area of the former mandate so soon after 1948, possibly antagonising Egpyt as well.
 
Probably so.
I don't know however what else could the Transjordans have done to their Cisjordan counterparts. Cisjordan Palestines were given citizenship and proportional representation.
I don't think there's anything they could do, because they're not the reason for the Cisjordanites getting a raw deal.
 
what is with recent threads repeating the title once or twice until they run out of character spaces?
 
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