WI John Adams loses Vice Presidency in 1792

What if George Clinton carved out a few more votes in the 1792 Electoral College, such that George Washington is still re-elected as handily as OTL but his VP, Adams, is not? How does this affect Washington's secovd term, the 1796 election, and subsequent history?
 
How did Alexander Hamilton and George Clinton get along?
Not well.
Try mortal enemies -- Hamilton basically spent a good chunk of his years between the war and Washington administration waging war against Clinton's New York political machine.

Suffice to say, if he becomes Vice President, then he'll be sidelined by the President worse than Adams was; I'm not sure how, or if, this changes things in the second term, but it will certainly change things in 1796.
 
Try mortal enemies -- Hamilton basically spent a good chunk of his years between the war and Washington administration waging war against Clinton's New York political machine.

Suffice to say, if he becomes Vice President, then he'll be sidelined by the President worse than Adams was; I'm not sure how, or if, this changes things in the second term, but it will certainly change things in 1796.

Okay, then how did Clinton get along with Burr at this point in time?
 
Thinking about how 1796 plays out TTL -- assuming 1793 goes as OTL, Jefferson is still a lead candidate, and I'd say he's more likely to win in this scenario.

The question that leaves though is, who is his leading (Federalist) opponent in 1796 and/or 1800? Is it possible, if the Reynolds Pamphlet is butterflied,* for Hamilton to be Jefferson's rival for re-election?
Okay, then how did Clinton get along with Burr at this point in time?
Burr is more complicated; one thing I can say is that OTL he had endeavored on his own campaign for 1792, competing with Clinton (and Adams) for the position, but bowed out before the EC.

*if Washington doesn't recall Monroe from France, due to Jefferson being placed to succeed him, this might be an effect
 
See https://groups.google.com/d/msg/soc.history.what-if/WWdwLlM4lyY/Tjd0fjfn5bEJ for my take on how a Clinton vice-presidential victory was indeed possible in 1792. As I noted, there are two big questions:

(1) Does Adams quit politics once and for all, as he often threatened to do? If so, who will the Federalist candidate for President be in 1796? (Maybe a Pinckney, but which one?...)

(2) Does Clinton insist on being Republican candidate for President in 1796 or is he willing to accept being Jefferson's running mate? (The Republicans would have preferred to run Jefferson rather than Clinton in 1792--but the fact that Virginia electors could not vote for both Washington and Jefferson ruled that out.) Even if he says he is willing, there is the embarrassing fact that if Republican electors vote solidly for both men and if they both outscore whoever the Federalists nominate--well, we could get the equivalent of the 1800 fiasco, four years earlier, with Clinton rather than Burr as the candidate who could hope to convince some Federalists that he was the lesser evil than Jefferson...
 
On who the Federalists back in 1796 and/or 1800 -- apparently Hamilton, circa 1795, thought the most likely successors to Washington "in the event of his retreat from his station" were either Adams, Jefferson, or John Jay.

CONSOLIDATE: On second point by @David T -- I'd say that Clinton consents to being Jefferson's number two easily enough. Also, Adams most likely would make good on his promise to retire.
 
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