WI: French victory at the Battle of The Golden Spurs (1306)

What if the forces of the Kingdom of France had managed to defeat the flemish rebels at the Battle of The Golden Spurs, in 1306?
Could Flanders remain a french possession? If so, then what are the effects of this? Could the french make a gradual expansion into the Netherlands?
What are the effects on the Hundred Years' War, assuming it isn't butterflied away?
 
Well, they lost that battle in 1302. By 1306, they had won decisively at Zierikzee in 1304 and crushed the Flemish at Mons-en-Pévèle in 1305 and Flanders was back under French overlordship. So I'd say no, since the culture clash was already there, the Flemish didn't like the French and they might have liked their counts even less who did their very best to alienate them. The butterfly effects it might have are probably more in terms of whose deaths are avoided in that battle, such as Robert II of Artois, thus making the Artois succession maybe a tad smoother and less prone to involve England and France. It would also mean Philippe le Bel does not need as much money, so while that probably won't affect his decision regarding the Templars much, he might be in a better financial position overall before his sons have a go at reigning.
 
Well, they lost that battle in 1302. By 1306, they had won decisively at Zierikzee in 1304 and crushed the Flemish at Mons-en-Pévèle in 1305 and Flanders was back under French overlordship. So I'd say no, since the culture clash was already there, the Flemish didn't like the French and they might have liked their counts even less who did their very best to alienate them. The butterfly effects it might have are probably more in terms of whose deaths are avoided in that battle, such as Robert II of Artois, thus making the Artois succession maybe a tad smoother and less prone to involve England and France. It would also mean Philippe le Bel does not need as much money, so while that probably won't affect his decision regarding the Templars much, he might be in a better financial position overall before his sons have a go at reigning.

I always need money :p But seriously, I too think that the outcome of Golden Spurs won't really affect the outcome of the Templars. BUT it can have huge butterfly affects on two major events that happened during that time. The first is that Margaret and Blanche of Burgundy may never even meet Gautier and Philippe d'Aunay, or else aren't stupid enough to gift them with Isabella's purses, which gets rid of the Tour de Nesle affair, which makes the beginning of Louis X's reign quite a bit easier. It might also prolong Philippe IV's life, since the shock of the affair might have shortened his life. The stability in the wake of Philippe IV's death then compounds with French domination of Flanders to strengthen Enguerrand de Marigny's position, since a good part of royal resistance to Marigny was his inability to effect Louis's annulment from Margaret, and a good baronial/aristocratic/Valois excuse against Marigny was alleged bribery from independent Flanders. Of course the baronial/Valois party still hate Marigny for other, main reasons, but they don't have this excuse against him.

In all, considering the best case, Philippe IV lives longer, allowing Louis to mature a bit and perhaps draw closer to his brother Philippe instead of his uncle Charles of Valois. Philippe IV's policies continue for a bit longer, particularly easing the famine period that started late in 1314, which makes France more stable. With Marigny hard to pin down he remains Rector-General, and administers the kingdom for Louis X as he did for Philippe IV.

France could expand into the Netherlands, I guess, but as with England in Ireland, the Black Death will greatly decrease their power in territory they're in the process of conquering.

France winning the Golden Spurs puts it in a much stronger position a decade or two later, which might dissuade Edward III from trying to claim his grandfather's throne. A big part of his deciding to invade was that France was so disunited at this time. After Louis X's death his brother Philippe V couldn't even retain Navarre, whose nobles preferred Louis X's daughter Jeanne to be their queen instead.
 
If we are to take a pod in the battle, I would say it's having Artois reining in the nobles and leaving the infantry finishing the Flemish militia as they were on the way of doing before the charge.

 
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