WI Empress Wei of Tang keeps power (710)

So a few years after the death of Wu Zeitan, her daughter-in-law the Empress Wei, was apparently looking to follow in her footsteps, but was overthrown in a coup by the emperor's nephew, who put his own father on the throne (Emperor Ruizong) before becoming emperor himself (as Xuanzong). Could she have remained in power, and if so, how hard would that be to achieve with a late (post Zeitan) PoD? If this isn't possible, or at least extremely difficult -- would it be possible for Princess Taiping (who also helped overthrow her, and acted as the "power behind the throne" for a few years until her death) to have lived longer and kept said power into her old age?

Once we have answers to these questions -- what are the effects? Would the next four decades of imperial administration be notably changed? And if so, could these changes have prevented disasters on scale of the An Lushan Rebellion? If so, how does this change the course of Chinese history?
 
I am gonna say yes as long as she purged the other Li imperial family members first. After Wu Zetian’s purges, there weren’t a lot left.

As for the effects? Who knows? We don’t know a lot about Empress Wei and her daughter apart from them being fairly unvirtuous people who supposedly murdered their husband/father. I do have to note that given her lack of legitimacy, there will certainly be a new round of purges, and officials would be appointed based on perceived loyalties than competence. You probably won’t have the same level of success as Xuanzong’s early reign.
 
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What would you say led Xuanzong’s reign to collapse into the An Lushan Rebellion? And could Wei, at least, do well enough to avoid that level of decline?
He lived way too long. He practically went ‘senile’ at the end.Xuanzong from the beginning and the Xuanzong at the end could be described as two different people. He turned from an young man who was open to ideas and a good judge of character to a stubborn old man who was convinced of his own invincibility, extremely paranoid of his own family, not really ruling anymore due to old age and appointed officials mainly based on perceived loyalties. In his old age, he practically abdicated his role as emperor to a group of corrupt officials.
 
He lived way too long. He practically went ‘senile’ at the end.Xuanzong from the beginning and the Xuanzong at the end could be described as two different people. He turned from an young man who was open to ideas and a good judge of character to a stubborn old man who was convinced of his own invincibility, extremely paranoid of his own family, not really ruling anymore due to old age and appointed officials mainly based on perceived loyalties. In his old age, he practically abdicated his role as emperor to a group of corrupt officials.
Supposing Xuanzong had, early in his reign, lost the fight against his aunt, Princess Taiping? Would the next three decades or so have been significantly less prosperous than OTL?
 
Supposing Xuanzong had, early in his reign, lost the fight against his aunt, Princess Taiping? Would the next three decades or so have been significantly less prosperous than OTL?
Presumably yes. Xuanzong up until the beginning of the Tianbao era could be ranked amongst one of the top emperors of China. For things to work well, he just needs to die before he executed his first crown prince or actually abdicated/retired once he felt that he wants to enjoy the luxuries of the office instead of ruling..
 
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