"Where Are We Going This Time": The Golden Age of Science Fiction

What should happen with the season summary updates?

  • Continue as is (might delay other updates)

    Votes: 6 75.0%
  • Release them later, as supplementary material

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • Cut out the OTL bits, only say what you've changed (might only be a temporary solution)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Stop them completely

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    8
  • Poll closed .
Chapter III: "I Give You Time, to Steal My Mind"

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Part III, Chapter III: "I Give You Time, to Steal My Mind"


Time was always an album that didn’t fit in with the rest of our material. But it was one of our most successful, looking back. Both the original album and the film led to my meeting Guy and Tom later that year, and I know that a lot of artists have admitted to it influencing them. But as for the meaning of the story, I’d tell you if it was real or a dream if I knew, but I don’t.”​
- Jeff Lynne on the impact of the Time album and film.


Eldorado, while not a huge financial success, was a critical one. It had, among other things, proved the commercial viability of the musical genre at a time when it was thought that the only way to do so was to make an animated film. Indeed, the surreal aspects of Eldorado led to it becoming a cult classic down the line, and only further cemented director Terry Gilliam’s status as “the man to do surreal with”.

Jeff Lynne was not done with musicals, however. Eldorado was one of only two full concept albums that ELO had made during their sixteen year run. Time, an album set in the far off year of 2095, followed a man transported from 1981 as he dealt with the strange world, that is equal parts familiar and alien to him.

As with Eldorado, the film would bring a re-recording of the album, but this time there would be some differences. Firstly, the three unused tracks, “Julie Don’t Live Here”, “When Time Stood Still” and “The Bouncer” would be included on the album. Secondly, the order of the tracks would be rearranged somewhat, to fit a clearer chronology, as the traveller experiences the future world.


Terry Gilliam would also direct Time, continuing his work with Lynne and HandMade Films, George Harrison’s film company. Time would be released in November 1996.


Plot Synopsis of Time (1996 film): [1]

A strange voice echoes over a barren landscape, revealing that it brings a message from another time. In 1981, a man goes to bed, but finds himself falling through a tunnel with flashing lights, seeing images of events as he is transported to the year 2095 (“Prologue”/”Twilight”). The traveller finds himself in the same room, and has access to incredible technology. He gets his bearings, and decides to look himself up, having figured out how to use the computer. He finds that in his 1981 life, he became a wildly successful businessman, founding a company that is responsible for much of the technological innovations that he sees, but that now effectively runs the world as a unified corporate state. He goes out onto the streets to see the world that he will create, and is saddened by how everything that he knows from his neighbourhood has changed. (“The Way Life’s Meant to Be”).

Finding that he does not know how to return to 1981, he decides to start recording messages for his fiancee Julie. During this time he finds that his every need is cared for by the company, and meets an android that is a facsimile of Julie, but is distant and cold (“Yours Truly, 2095”). The traveller decides to take advantage of the technological marvels, and orders a ticket to visit the moon (“Ticket to the Moon”). On the day he is to leave, in the morning he decides to visit Julie’s old neighbourhood to see if it has changed too, discovering that Julie left him after seeing what his company was doing to the world (“Julie Don’t Live Here”). As the traveller boards the shuttle to the moon, he realises that the technological marvels that he is enjoying are not worth losing his love for, but that he has no way of changing it, as he cannot return to 1981 (“Another Heart Breaks”/”When Time Stood Still”).


The traveller arrives on the moon, visiting one of the cities scattered across the surface in environmental domes that simulate an Earth climate. He meets with some scientists who claim to be able to transport him back in time, but discovers that their machine does not work, only able tos end his messages, as his company has withdrawn research grants (“Rain is Falling”). Unexpectedly, an event occurs on Earth (what happens exactly is not specified) that disrupts the climate, causing millions of deaths. His company, despite having the power to do so, decides to not evacuate any non-employees, claiming that it would “not be profitable”. In addition, they stop all flights to or from Earth. The traveller becomes convinced that Julie is ignoring the messages that he has sent back, and gives up on seeing her again, deciding to live a hedonistic life instead (“From the End of the World”).

An unknown time later, the traveller has grown tired of his lifestyle, and is drowning his sorrows at a bar on the Moon, but is snapped out of his depressive mood by one of the songs that the band at the bar plays, finding that its lyrics resonate with him (“The Lights Go Down”). He decides that he will return to Julie at any cost, and stop this future from occurring. He is able to board a shuttle to Satellite Two, but finds that flights to Earth are still grounded. He decides that this will not stop him, and he steals a shuttle, breaking out of the station, and making a course for Earth, pursued by the authorities (“Here is the News”). As the authorities catch up with him, and are about to shoot his shuttle down, time suddenly stops, and the traveller is greeted by one of the “Shades of Time” that transported him to the future. The shade reveals that this has all been done to make the man change his ways, and that he does not belong in the future. The traveller’s rejection of the future world convinced the shades that he has learned his lesson, and that he will be sent back (“21st Century Man”).

As the traveller is returned to his home time, he muses over whether the events actually transpired, or whether they were a vivid dream. He also ponders as to what Julie’s response would be if he told her what had happened, deciding that she would likely tell him it was a dream. (“The Bouncer”). As he returns to the point that he was taken from, he awakes in his bed, changed. He scraps his plans for a certain technological advancement that would have led to the future he saw, and decides to live a fulfilling life with Julie instead. As he walks off to work, he spots the shade again, which gives him an approving look as the credits roll (“Epilogue”/”Hold on Tight”)


Cast of Time (1996 film):
  • The Traveller – River Phoenix [2]​
  • Julie/Julie-droid – Idina Menzel​
  • The Bar Singer – Jeff Lynne [3]​

Time was more successful than Eldorado at release, though reviews were slightly less positive. Still, it was a critical success, and only served to further prove the viability of the musical, showing that Eldorado was not a one-off. Following this, various composers and musicians would consider bringing certain musicals and concept albums to the screen to cash in on what might be a new craze.


But Time would not be the only excitement for Jeff Lynne that year. In August of 1996, he signed one of the first acts to join the Wilbury label since it changed from Dark Horse Records. The pair, a French duo called “Daft Punk”, had been DJ-ing in various places, and had had successful singles such as “Da Funk”. The success of these singles was the source of a bidding war, and while not a sizeable record in its own right, Warner Bros. Records were willing to bid on behalf of the Wilbury Records label. Daft Punk’s debut album, Homework, was slated for a 1997 release, and Lynne stepped in to assist in the production of the record. [4]


[1] I'll level with you. I'm not as happy with this as I am my story for Eldorado. I've tried to clear up some time inconsistencies in the songs here and there, but there is some stuff I can't completely avoid.
[2] I've narrowly avoided his death. It's instead a near-death experience, which acts as a bit of a wake-up call to him about his drug use.
[3] The person that sings "The Lights Go Down". I think a musical cameo is earned for him.
[4] Daft Punk have some massive ELO influences, and they're sort of a spiritual successor in some ways to me. So I decided that they can work with Lynne. He won't so a huge amount, and going forward, they'll mostly work on their own.
 
Chapter IV: "A New Trek Begins"

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Part III, Chapter IV: "A New Trek Begins"

“We did deviate from Gene’s vision for the future somewhat during this time, but we kept true to the spirit of it. The shows were always optimistic about humanity’s future, but they weren’t afraid to show our many flaws. Deep Space Nine had the departure from the utopian vision, as did Odyssey, but in different ways. Deep Space Nine had the Federation at war, using ships like the Valiant that were built for combat, while on Odyssey, we saw a vessel that was stranded years away from home, crewed by people who were at odds with each other.”​
- David Gerrold on the beginning of his time as franchise head. [1]


Star Trek: Odyssey was going to be unlike any show that had come before in the franchise. The writers were promising that there would be full consequences for actions, a crew at war with itself, and a chance to see what Starfleet is truly like when separated from their luxury. Much as with Deep Space Nine, some fans would criticise this approach as not being true to Gene Roddenberry’s utopian vision for the future.

In contrast to Deep Space Nine, which was developing an arc that would stretch over multiple seasons, Odyssey would feature smaller season arcs, as each season brought new recurring features, having a “theme”. The “theme” for the first season would be one of conflict, both within the crew, and without. As it would mark the beginning of their time together, the crew would be more combative with each other than in later seasons. But the crew of the Odyssey would also face off against the Kazon, a foe which while not technologically advanced, were highly numerous, and would be able to wage a war of attrition against the ship and crew. [2]


The initial story, “Caretaker”, would see the Odyssey and two other ships, one Cardassian and the other Maquis, flung to the far edge of the Delta Quadrant by the “Caretaker Array”. There, they would be faced with the decision to either use the array’s remaining power to transport them back, condemning the Ocampan people to slavery, or destroy the array, which would strand them in the Delta Quadrant, with an eighty year return trip.

Throughout the series, the crew of the Odyssey, not being comprised of Starfleet, Maquis and Cardassian personnel, would have to deal with dwindling supplies, and would start to alter the ship to make it more self sustainable, as they meet and barter with other species, with some even joining the crew. The plan was that over the time of the show, the crew of the ship would begin to change, as would the ship itself. [3]


The initial size of the cast would strike some concerns that some characters would be left without any development. To avoid this, a deal was struck ensuring that each main character (i.e. appearing in the opening credits) would have at least one story in the season that focussed on them. In addition, the cast would have a great deal of control over how their characters developed over the seasons. [4]


The increased success of Deep Space Nine on UPN caused the decision to release Odyssey into first-run syndication into some doubt. The executives at Paramount decided to see what the viewership of the first season would be like, and if it was not as high as they hoped, they would move further seasons over to UPN.

The success of Deep Space Nine and Star Trek VI: Generations only increased expectations for this new show. It was promising something brave and new, and was the first show to be made completely under the management of David Gerrold. Odyssey would be a test to see if this new era of Star Trek could thrive, or if it would be stillborn.


[1] A little hint for DS9 Season 3 there.
[2] If it continues, ODY will feature a new "big bad" every season.
[3] I know I've said it before, but the Odyssey will be altered throughout the show. They'll grow their own food etc.
[4] The characters that are "the same" as OTL won't be for long. Voyager was a show of missed opportunities, and I plan on taking many of them.
 
Part III, Chapter IV: "A New Trek Begins"

“We did deviate from Gene’s vision for the future somewhat during this time, but we kept true to the spirit of it. The shows were always optimistic about humanity’s future, but they weren’t afraid to show our many flaws. Deep Space Nine had the departure from the utopian vision, as did Odyssey, but in different ways. Deep Space Nine had the Federation at war, using ships like the Valiant that were built for combat, while on Odyssey, we saw a vessel that was stranded years away from home, crewed by people who were at odds with each other.”​
- David Gerrold on the beginning of his time as franchise head. [1]


Star Trek: Odyssey was going to be unlike any show that had come before in the franchise. The writers were promising that there would be full consequences for actions, a crew at war with itself, and a chance to see what Starfleet is truly like when separated from their luxury. Much as with Deep Space Nine, some fans would criticise this approach as not being true to Gene Roddenberry’s utopian vision for the future.

In contrast to Deep Space Nine, which was developing an arc that would stretch over multiple seasons, Odyssey would feature smaller season arcs, as each season brought new recurring features, having a “theme”. The “theme” for the first season would be one of conflict, both within the crew, and without. As it would mark the beginning of their time together, the crew would be more combative with each other than in later seasons. But the crew of the Odyssey would also face off against the Kazon, a foe which while not technologically advanced, were highly numerous, and would be able to wage a war of attrition against the ship and crew. [2]


The initial story, “Caretaker”, would see the Odyssey and two other ships, one Cardassian and the other Maquis, flung to the far edge of the Delta Quadrant by the “Caretaker Array”. There, they would be faced with the decision to either use the array’s remaining power to transport them back, condemning the Ocampan people to slavery, or destroy the array, which would strand them in the Delta Quadrant, with an eighty year return trip.

Throughout the series, the crew of the Odyssey, not being comprised of Starfleet, Maquis and Cardassian personnel, would have to deal with dwindling supplies, and would start to alter the ship to make it more self sustainable, as they meet and barter with other species, with some even joining the crew. The plan was that over the time of the show, the crew of the ship would begin to change, as would the ship itself. [3]


The initial size of the cast would strike some concerns that some characters would be left without any development. To avoid this, a deal was struck ensuring that each main character (i.e. appearing in the opening credits) would have at least one story in the season that focussed on them. In addition, the cast would have a great deal of control over how their characters developed over the seasons. [4]


The increased success of Deep Space Nine on UPN caused the decision to release Odyssey into first-run syndication into some doubt. The executives at Paramount decided to see what the viewership of the first season would be like, and if it was not as high as they hoped, they would move further seasons over to UPN.

The success of Deep Space Nine and Star Trek VI: Generations only increased expectations for this new show. It was promising something brave and new, and was the first show to be made completely under the management of David Gerrold. Odyssey would be a test to see if this new era of Star Trek could thrive, or if it would be stillborn.


[1] A little hint for DS9 Season 3 there.
[2] If it continues, ODY will feature a new "big bad" every season.
[3] I know I've said it before, but the Odyssey will be altered throughout the show. They'll grow their own food etc.
[4] The characters that are "the same" as OTL won't be for long. Voyager was a show of missed opportunities, and I plan on taking many of them.
Odyssey sound like a interesting show and I am looking forward to see what you do with the idea.
 

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Odyssey sound like a interesting show and I am looking forward to see what you do with the idea.
The basic idea I had for Odyssey is that it's what Voyager could/should have been. Not seven/eight seasons of "Year of Hell", but with proper consequences that we never properly saw, aside from Voyager occsasionally having a reputation. No more reset button, no more endless shuttles and torpedoes with no explanation, and no more "Threshold". This will be a ship that, if it makes it back to the Alpha Quadrant, will do so as a result of its ingenuity, hard work, and collaboration, not deus ex machinas.


On another note, after this first season of Odyssey's updates are out, I'm going to be taking a little break from the timeline. It actually coincides nicely with a trip I'm making, so after the next two, there won't be any updates until next Monday. I need to recharge my batteries. As of late, while I've continued to enjoy writing the timeline, it's begin to feel like a bit of an obligation, and I want to change that. I've also felt like I've become the overly demanding boss to those of you that have been helping me out, and if I came across that way, I am sorry. I want this to be a fun experience for all involved, readers, collaborators and me alike.
 
This will be a ship that, if it makes it back to the Alpha Quadrant, will do so as a result of its ingenuity, hard work, and collaboration, not deus ex machinas.
That very reason is why I think that the final Voyager episode is one of the worst of the Series.
Instead of figuring out how to get home on their own, The Janeway from the future shows up with Advance Technology so they can beat the borgs and get home.
Why did the Future Janeway not show up before they got pull into the Delta Quadrant or just after they got there. Why wait till 7 years to show up?
I never like that final episode.
There was a good Fan Fiction Virtual Series Voyager 7.5 that rewrote the last season. In it they get home by combining the tech that they run across as they have travel and they have to deal with a Borg Civil War between the individual Borgs and the Collective that they encourage over the show.

Year of Hell
I heard people online who said that Year in Hell should have been a full season. I do not agree with that. At best it should have been a 4 to 6 part story.
I did not mind that Year in Hell reset the Voyager but i hated that no one remembered any thing. The Crew should have had some memmories of the events.
I suggested that the first episode after Year in Hell should have had the Doctor who remember nothing , treating the Woman whom he closed the door on and let her die in the episodes . The Doctor is his usual good nature self and the female crew member remembers being killed because of his choice. She is trying to leave.

I hope you have a nice vacation and I look forward to seeing what you come up with when you return.
 
I am very interested in Odyssey to see what a Star Trek show can do when allowed to be less comfortable than TNG. It will be more TOS in some ways- more 'wild'.

Having a multi-species cast will hopefully allow for non-Human viewpoints (and not just Human with pointy bits stuck on). Plus if the visiting aliens stick around we might end up with shades of BSG. Hopefully they still meet that Klingon D7 and bring them along for the ride....

Also do not feel bad about taking a break from the timeline, writing can be exhausting, and getting a recharge will help I suspect.
 
Chapter V: "The Odyssey Begins"

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Part III, Chapter V: "The Odyssey Begins"

“That first year on set was the hardest, by far. We were still figuring our characters out, and we didn’t all know each other quite as well as we do now yet. But it was fun as well. I got to play a character that isn’t sure of herself, but has to maintain a tough facade to stop either of her ambitious aides from taking her position. Janeway was a character of compromise, but also one of action.”​
- Claudia Christian on her role as Captain Katherine Janeway.


Expectations were high for the first season of Star Trek: Odyssey. It had promised much, and fans were expecting the show to deliver. Most important, out of all of these promises would be that the show would have “real consequences”, abandoning the “reset button” that many of the other shows in the franchise used to allow for the stories to be watched out of order easily. Odyssey’s writing staff said that they had found a happy balance, that would allow for people to watch it out of order, but would reward the viewers for sticking with the show.

Part of these consequences would be the Kazon, this season’s main antagonists. Pursuing the Odyssey to get revenge on them for thwarting their plans in the show’s opening episode, they would appear again and again to hamper her trip home, until the Odyssey left Kazon space at the end of the season. [1]


The first season of Star Trek: Odyssey would be praised, though some of the acting and writing was criticised at times. Most were, however, confident that these issues would be solved as the show went on, as it had with The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine.


List of Episodes of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey: [2]
  1. Caretaker (Part I)​
  2. Caretaker (Part II)​
  3. Parallax​
  4. Forget-Me-Not​
  5. Barefoot Through the Stars
  6. Duty and State​
  7. Eye of the Needle​
  8. Time and Again​
  9. Prime Factors​
  10. Living in the Moment​
  11. The Enemy of my Enemy​
  12. Stuck in the Middle
  13. Cabin Fever​
  14. Strange Bedfellows​
  15. State of Flux​
  16. Extravagance in Violence
  17. Learning Curve​
  18. Phage​
  19. Vengeance (Part I)​
  20. Vengeance (Part II)​
Bold text indicates a story written by @The Chimera Virus

Cast of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey:
  • Captain Katherine Janeway – Claudia Christian​
  • Commander Chatan – Graham Greene​
  • Commander (Gul) Evek – Nigel Havers​
  • Lt. Tuvok – Tim Russ​
  • Lt. (Glinn) Rejal – Tracy Scoggins​
  • Lt. (j.g.) Kollin Torres – Kim Cattrall​
  • Ensign Harry Kim – Garrett Wang​
  • Ensign Nick Locarno – Robert Duncan McNeill​
  • The Doctor – Robert Picardo​
  • Falox – Ethan Phillips​
  • Kes – Jennifer Gatti​

As many had predicted, the show would suffer somewhat from not being on network television, and being released into first-run syndication. While Deep Space Nine was bringing in about 9% of the US audience, the first season of Odyssey only managed 6%. Given its positive reviews, however, the decision was made to bring it over to UPN for its second and further seasons.

The cast and crew had proven that the format could work. Production on the second season began during the first’s airing, as they planned to bring Deep Space Nine’s fourth, and Odyssey’s second seasons in line with the old airing schedule for The Next Generation. Overall, fans were relieved to find another show to follow, and to see proof that this new era of Star Trek could do well. [3]


[1] The Kazon will only really stick around for this season. Next season's big bads are introduced in one of these stories, and they're a species that I think was quite interesting.
[2] Very few stories from OTL's Voyager will make it through. A lot of original(-ish) story ideas for this show. That's one of the reasons I've been looking forward to it so much.
[3] So far, DS9 and ODY have been airing Jan-Jun, but that's going to change to Oct-May, with a break around December.
 
Last edited:

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
I am very interested in Odyssey to see what a Star Trek show can do when allowed to be less comfortable than TNG. It will be more TOS in some ways- more 'wild'.

Having a multi-species cast will hopefully allow for non-Human viewpoints (and not just Human with pointy bits stuck on). Plus if the visiting aliens stick around we might end up with shades of BSG. Hopefully they still meet that Klingon D7 and bring them along for the ride....

Also do not feel bad about taking a break from the timeline, writing can be exhausting, and getting a recharge will help I suspect.
Odyssey is a show that should be wild. One issue I had with Voyager was that at times it was hinted that people were joining the crew, but I can't recall really seeing it beyond Neelix, Kes and Seven. But we'll see a few recurring characters from various species they encounter, as they join the crew for whatever reason. I'm trying to bring some large elements of BSG into the show, which works as Ron D. Moore is involved.

I'm glad to be taking a break. I've never been this active creatively for as long as I have, and I'm close to a burnout. Even the knowledge that I'll be taking a break is making these last few updates easier. As I said in the one year retrospective, you could plot a decent graph of my mood last year by frequency of updates. As you can tell, they've been a little more frequent since January (in fact, over a third of the word count is since Jan), and I've been in a much better place. Even just going for a few days feels weird, when I had entire months off last year. Barring these breaks, I'll try to keep that level of activity going. One more update this week, then I'll be signing off until next Monday.
 
Part III, Chapter V: "The Odyssey Begins"

“That first year on set was the hardest, by far. We were still figuring our characters out, and we didn’t all know each other quite as well as we do now yet. But it was fun as well. I got to play a character that isn’t sure of herself, but has to maintain a tough facade to stop either of her ambitious aides from taking her position. Janeway was a character of compromise, but also one of action.”​
- Claudia Christian on her role as Captain Katherine Janeway.


Expectations were high for the first season of Star Trek: Odyssey. It had promised much, and fans were expecting the show to deliver. Most important, out of all of these promises would be that the show would have “real consequences”, abandoning the “reset button” that many of the other shows in the franchise used to allow for the stories to be watched out of order easily. Odyssey’s writing staff said that they had found a happy balance, that would allow for people to watch it out of order, but would reward the viewers for sticking with the show.

Part of these consequences would be the Kazon, this season’s main antagonists. Pursuing the Odyssey to get revenge on them for thwarting their plans in the show’s opening episode, they would appear again and again to hamper her trip home, until the Odyssey left Kazon space at the end of the season. [1]


The first season of Star Trek: Odyssey would be praised, though some of the acting and writing was criticised at times. Most were, however, confident that these issues would be solved as the show went on, as it had with The Next Generation and Deep Space Nine.


List of Episodes of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey: [2]
  1. Caretaker (Part I)​
  2. Caretaker (Part II)​
  3. Parallax​
  4. Forget-Me-Not​
  5. Barefoot Through the Stars
  6. Duty and State​
  7. Eye of the Needle​
  8. Protectors​
  9. Prime Factors​
  10. Living in the Moment​
  11. The Enemy of my Enemy​
  12. Stuck in the Middle
  13. Cabin Fever​
  14. Strange Bedfellows​
  15. State of Flux​
  16. Extravagance in Violence
  17. Learning Curve​
  18. Phage​
  19. Vengeance (Part I)​
  20. Vengeance (Part II)​
Bold text indicates a story written by @The Chimera Virus

Cast of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey:
  • Captain Katherine Janeway – Claudia Christian​
  • Commander Chatan – Graham Greene​
  • Commander (Gul) Evek – Nigel Havers​
  • Lt. Tuvok – Tim Russ​
  • Lt. (Glinn) Rejal – Tracy Scoggins​
  • Lt. (j.g.) Kollin Torres – Kim Cattrall​
  • Ensign Harry Kim – Garrett Wang​
  • Ensign Nick Locarno – Robert Duncan McNeill​
  • The Doctor – Robert Picardo​
  • Falox – Ethan Phillips​
  • Kes – Jennifer Gatti​

As many had predicted, the show would suffer somewhat from not being on network television, and being released into first-run syndication. While Deep Space Nine was bringing in about 9% of the US audience, the first season of Odyssey only managed 6%. Given its positive reviews, however, the decision was made to bring it over to UPN for its second and further seasons.

The cast and crew had proven that the format could work. Production on the second season began during the first’s airing, as they planned to bring Deep Space Nine’s fourth, and Odyssey’s second seasons in line with the old airing schedule for The Next Generation. Overall, fans were relieved to find another show to follow, and to see proof that this new era of Star Trek could do well. [3]


[1] The Kazon will only really stick around for this season. Next season's big bads are introduced in one of these stories, and they're a species that I think was quite interesting.
[2] Very few stories from OTL's Voyager will make it through. A lot of original(-ish) story ideas for this show. That's one of the reasons I've been looking forward to it so much.
[3] So far, DS9 and ODY have been airing Jan-Jun, but that's going to change to Oct-May, with a break around December.
You took away Time and Again and also Phage.
Not that they were perfect episodes but they were some of the best of season one episodes.
Yes some of this was due to the poor quality of the first season episodes /
 

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
You took away Time and Again and also Phage.
Not that they were perfect episodes but they were some of the best of season one episodes.
Yes some of this was due to the poor quality of the first season episodes /
Phage is still in, just before the closing two-parter. I thought Time and Again was decent too, but there was a concept I wanted to explore that was a little too similar to it.
 
Phage is still in, just before the closing two-parter. I thought Time and Again was decent too, but there was a concept I wanted to explore that was a little too similar to it.
Missed Phage. Sorry.
I looking forward to your episodes summaries to see what is different.
Thanks for all your hard work on this timeline.
 

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Little note: I'm removing Protectors from Season 1, not because I don't like the idea, but it's too similar to Prime Factors. In its place, I'm reinstating Time and Again, as I think it can work okay with the other story I was worried about.
 
Little note: I'm removing Protectors from Season 1, not because I don't like the idea, but it's too similar to Prime Factors. In its place, I'm reinstating Time and Again, as I think it can work okay with the other story I was worried about.
I glad to see Time and Again restored.
But if you need to get rid of a episodes, how about Learning Curve? While the idea of having to train the Maquis in the way Star Fleet does thing is not bad and if we got Cardassian on the ship, that plot might be used with them , at best we are looking a B story. But the Tech problems being caused by a piece of Cheese is just Silly.
 

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
I glad to see Time and Again restored.
But if you need to get rid of a episodes, how about Learning Curve? While the idea of having to train the Maquis in the way Star Fleet does thing is not bad and if we got Cardassian on the ship, that plot might be used with them , at best we are looking a B story. But the Tech problems being caused by a piece of Cheese is just Silly.
Learning Curve is getting a major alteration, but I wanted to put Protectors back a couple seasons because the MacGuffin for that episode is really similar to the spatial trajector from "Prime Factors".
 
Learning Curve is getting a major alteration, but I wanted to put Protectors back a couple seasons because the MacGuffin for that episode is really similar to the spatial trajector from "Prime Factors".
I am looking forward to see what you come up with.
I enjoy your story summeries.
 
Overview of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Overview of Season 1 of Star Trek: Odyssey

“We’re over 100 thousand light years away from home, and you’re seriously suggesting that we take the long way home?”
“The Gamma Quadrant entrance to the Bajoran Wormhole may be closer, but that would require that we pass through Dominion space. The Dominion crippled a Galaxy-class with ease, just to prove a point. Do you think they would have any difficulty in taking us out for violating their space?”
“We don’t know that the Dominion will still be hostile then.”
“And we don’t know that the Wormhole will be open either. Starfleet is considering collapsing it to protect the Alpha Quadrant, as a last line of defence. I have the safety of not one, but three crews to consider, and I will not set out on a sixty year journey, only to find that we’re no closer than when we started. If you ask me, twenty years is more than enough of a price to secure that.”
“Captain, I must protest!"
“Your protest is noted. But right now, you are on my ship, and on my crew. You will obey my orders. Dismissed.”
- Captain Janeway and Commander Chatan discuss their route home, from “Parallax”.


Caretaker
In the Badlands, a Cardassian vessel pursues a Maquis ship, the Val Jean, when they are both caught by a displacement wave. On Earth, newly minted Captain Katherine Janeway of the starship Odyssey recruits disgraced Starfleet Cadet Nick Locarno to assist her in finding the Maquis ship, due to his ties with Maquis members. Janeway is hoping to find Tuvok, her new Chief of Security, who was undercover on the Maquis ship when it disappeared.​

Upon departing Deep Space Nine, where the rest of the crew have been enjoying shore leave, the Odyssey enters the Badlands. The ship is scanned by a “coherent tetryon beam”, before it is caught by another displacement wave. The wave damages the ship, killing much of the crew, including the first officer, helm officer, much of the engineering staff, and the entire medical staff. The Emergency Medical Hologram is activated to treat the injured crew.​

The bridge crew recovers, determining that they have been transported to the far side of the Delta Quadrant, over 120,000 light years from Federation space. Before they can determine their exact position, the crew finds themselves inside a holographic simulation on a nearby array, which is controlled by an advanced alien called “the Caretaker”. They see through the simulation, and find the unconcious Maquis and Cardassian crews undergoing medical experimentation. The Odyssey crew soon finds themselves subjected to the same experiments. The crews awake on their own ships, but each find themselves missing a crew member, Harry Kim from Odyssey, Kollin Torres from the Val Jean, and Gilora Rejal from the Cardassian ship. The three captains form an uneasy alliance to retrieve their lost crew members, then return to the Alpha Quadrant.​

The ships follow energy pulses sent by the arrays to a nearby planet. On the way, they encounter a trader, Falox, who is willing to assist them in exchange for protection for him and his companion, the Ocampa Kes, who lives on the planet, under Kazon rule. The Ocampa live in a subterranean complex, with their needs provided for by the Caretaker, who asks that they care for any beings that the Caretaker sends them, each suffering an incurable disease.​

The pulses increase in frequency, and Tuvok deduces that the Caretaker is dying, and making sure that the Ocampa have enough supplies, before he will seal them away. The crews find a way to bypass the complex’s shields, and the Cardassians send an away team down, rescuing Kim, Torres and Rejal while the Odyssey's crew works on repairing their ship. The crews ask for the Caretaker to return them to the Alpha Quadrant once more, and the Caretaker reveals that he was once part of an ancient race that accidentally destroyed the ecosystem of the Ocampan homeworld. As penance, he has devoted his life to ensuring that they endure, and has been searching for a species that would be a genetic match so that he could pass the responsibility on.​

As he nears death, the Caretaker activates the facility’s self-destruct sequence, in order to prevent the Kazon from obtaining its technology. As he dies, a Kazon fleet arrives, and begins to attack the station and the ships. Janeway, Chatan, and Evek co-ordinate a counter-attack to stop the Kazon, but Chatan is forced to sacrifice his ship, while Evek’s is damaged beyond repair, and the crew is beamed out. The array is damaged beyond repair when a Kazon ship hits it, leaving the crews stranded in the Delta Quadrant. With only the Odyssey remaining, the three crews are all now living on the one ship.​

With the array destroyed, the Kazon disengage, though not before warning Janeway and the others that they have made an enemy. As Odyssey begins its 80 year journey back, Janeway integrates the Cardassian and Maquis crews into the ship, with Chatan and Evek as her first and second officers respectively. She also reinstates Locarno, giving him the provisional rank of Ensign, assigning him as the new helmsman. In exchange for continued protection, Kes and Falox also join the crew as a scout and guide.​


Parallax
As the Odyssey begins its long journey back to the Alpha Quadrant, tensions arise among the crew. Janeway, Chatan, and Evek can agree that they need to integrate the crews to provide a unified identity, and fill the vacancies. Evek recommends that Rejal take the role of Chief of Engineering, though Janeway would rather appoint Lt. Joe Carey. Meanwhile, the ship passes by a quantum singularity, detecting a ship stuck in its event horizon, and decide to try to rescue it.​
Recurring Cast: Josh Clark as Lt. Carey​


Forget-Me-Not
After bartering for supplies at a local planet, the crew of the Odyssey find themselves affected by a virus that causes anterograde amnesia, meaning that none of the crew can form new memories. Only the Doctor remains unaffected, but he cannot leave Sickbay. As the factions in the crew grow more suspicious of each other as they wake each day to find the ship different to how they remember, the Doctor tries to find a cure before the crew tears itself apart.​


Barefoot Through the Stars by @The Chimera Virus
The Odyssey is investigating a strange hole in space in an attempt to work out if it can be used to get them home quicker. Everyone is astonished when, apropos of nothing, a group of people walk out of it. The leader, a woman named Peripa, moseys on over and sits down on the hull just outside the viewscreen, asking everyone how their day is going. This race, the Striders, have achieved the ability to walk through space without the need for spacesuits, and are quite happy to share the secret.​

The crews come to a contentious agreement that this information may come in handy somehow, though the Cardassians are convinced this is secretly a moronically ballsy plan to do something to the Odyssey on the Striders’ part. However, the Striders’ uniqueness has earned them the ire of the Unctouin Confederation, which prizes fealty to their established scientific knowledge above all else. Any innovation or deviation is met with death. Should the Odyssey not give up the Striders to be massacred, then the UC will destroy all of them.​
Recurring Cast: Diedrich Bader as Kel Aval and Tarik Ergin as Ensign Ayala​
Guest Stars: Cree Summer as Peripa and John Carroll Lynch as UC Nepetor Boravnis​


Duty and State
Evek raises concern with Janeway that he, despite being the leader of one of the contingents of the crew, is being ignored as second officer. He also submits evidence that someone in the crew is working for the Obsidian Order, and trying to access classified logs on the ship. The operative is revealed to be Chief Engineer Rejal, who was posted on Evek’s ship to monitor him. Evek and Rejal are forced to come to terms with their new home, and the way that things are different, in stark contrast to their previous duty to serve the Cardassian Order.​


Eye of the Needle
The Odyssey detects a wormhole, and hopes that it can be used to shorten their trip back home. However, the crew find that it is a micro-wormhole, only 30 centimetres across. They realise that it may be possible to send a message to the Alpha Quadrant, and make contact with a Romulan ship on the other side. Complications reveal that the other side of the wormhole is 20 years in the past, but they are able to send messages through, to be relayed in 20 years time.​


Time and Again
The Odyssey’s sensors detect “polaric” detonations on a nearby planet. Janeway and Torres beam down to investigate, finding the planet in ruins, with a number of temporal anomalies. Investigating one, they find themselves on the planet the day before the detonation, and try to find the reason for the explosion. Using Kes’ psychic abilities, they are able to determine that Janeway and Torres have been sent to the past, and try to create a new anomaly to rescue them.​


Prime Factors
The Odyssey encounters a highly hospitable race, the Sikarians, who invite them to their homeworld. They find themselves transported over 40,000 light years away, and try to barter for the technology, but the Sikarians refuse to do so, citing their version of the Prime Directive. While Rejal, Carey, and Seska try to replicate the technology, with the assistance of Tuvok, Janeway and Evek discover that the Sikarians are a race of information brokers, acting as “the power behind the throne” in this portion of the Quadrant.​
Recurring Cast: Martha Hackett as Seska, Josh Clark as Lt. Carey​


Living in the Moment
The Odyssey is hailed by a trader from Falox’s past. He reveals that Falox is held in low repute in this section of space, due to various events in his past. Falox reveals that he used to run illegal substances across this area of space, but does not do so after he was caught by the Trabe. Suspicious, Janeway orders his ship, the Baxial, which is stored in the shuttle bay, to be searched. They discover multiple illegal substances, and are forced to weigh up whether Falox’s assistance in navigating local space is more trouble than it is worth.​


The Enemy of My Enemy
The Odyssey encounters another Kazon fleet, the Kazon-Nistrim, who explain to them the way Kazon society works. As the Odyssey is being continually attacked by other sects as they travel through a more disputed region of space, Evek and Chatan temporarily put their differences to one side, and start working on a plan to arm the smaller sects so that they can gain control of local space, in exchange for free passage.​


Stuck in the Middle by @The Chimera Virus
Attempting to skirt around an active warzone, the Odyssey becomes embroiled in a skirmish at the edge of the action. The belligerents, the Ojentor and Morthlan, both attack the Odyssey to force it out of the way. In doing so, they cripple one of the warp nacelles, preventing the ship from leaving. The Morthlan board the ship, attempting to exterminate everyone onboard. They are repelled by security, but it’s a near thing. The Morthlan ship is called away, regardless, leaving several injured Morthlan behind. The Ojentor come to help after some discussion, offering their expertise. However, upon discovering the Morthlans being treated in sickbay, the Ojentor demand to extradite them to their homeworld so they may be publicly executed. When Janeway and Chatan refuse, Evek attempts to circumvent them to ensure the ship is repaired more quickly. Things go from worse to terrible when the lead Morthlan invader dies. His body produces a Morthlan imp, which escapes into the Jeffries tubes and begins to wreak havoc on the Odyssey’s innards.​
Recurring Cast: Diedrich Bader as Kel Aval​
Guest Stars: Michael Jeter as Sulpori and Chris Ellis as Keatrukhys, the lead Morthlan invader​


Cabin Fever
While training Kes as a nurse to assist him, the Doctor expresses frustration at his inability to travel beyond Sickbay and holodecks. As he tries to convince Rejal and Janeway to fit the rest of the ship with holoemitters, they find that their supplies are dwindling, and there are no major trading posts nearby for them to restock. Kes suggests that they begin to grow their own food on the ship, using one of the unused cargo bays, converting it to a hydroponics lab. They fit the lab with holoemitters so that he can assist with the loose botanical knowledge in his database, beginning to form a proper friendship.​


Strange Bedfellows
The Odyssey continues to be attacked by Kazon-Ogla ships. While they are fending them off easily, they are taking a heavy amount of attrition, with more and more systems failing. The Odyssey manages to make contact with the Trabe, the Kazon’s former overlords. Janeway strikes up a deal to supply the Trabe in exchange for passage, unaware of Evek and Chatan’s plan to do the same with the smaller Kazon sects. When Tuvok is asked to inspect the disappearance of weapons, he is made privy to the plan to supply the other Kazon, creating a new plan to supply both the Kazon and the Trabe, providing them free passage, no matter who wins.​


State of Flux
While the crew forages for food on a nearby planet, the Odyssey is attacked by a cloaked Kazon vessel. While the crew returns to the ship, Chatan remains to search for Seska. After finding her, they return to the ship, having dinner together, but Chatan discovers that it has been made with ingredients stolen from the hydroponics bay by Maquis crewmembers. Later, the Odyssey answers a distress call from a Kazon ship, which is destroyed by a malfunctioning piece of equipment that is found to be Starfleet in origin. Janeway orders an investigation, but begins to suspect a plot on the ship to prevent the investigation from discovering anything meaningful.​
Recurring Cast: Martha Hackett as Seska, Josh Clark as Lt. Carey​


Extravagance in Violence by @The Chimera Virus
In an intriguing turn of events, the Odyssey has been invited to a nearby planet, Seliskan Prime, for their annual Existential Festival. As honored guests, the crew is celebrated for several days. On the fourth day, they’re informed that it’s now time for the Ceremony of Blood to begin. The crew doesn’t meet this with the same rapturous applause as the native Selisk-Waru. It may be due to the fact that Nick Locarno, Harry Kim, and Rejal are expected to perform a lavish staging of the local creation myth. One that ends with the Prime Mother executing the Noble Lovers and fertilizing the land with their blood.​
Guest Star: Anne Francis as Forbanet, Ivar Brogger as Giibrodas, and Ray Reinhardt as the Lorekeeper​


Learning Curve
Tuvok expresses concern that the Maquis and Cardassian crew are becoming more and more hostile towards each other, especially in light of the plan to supply the Kazon being revealed. Janeway is still hesitant to trust Tuvok, but agrees to let him run the crew through team-building exercises. Meanwhile, Kes and the Doctor attempt to find the source of an infection in the bio-neural circuitry that runs many of the ship’s systems, tracing it to an unknown pathogen on some of the supplies they picked up in a recent trade. Torres encourages Tuvok to loosen his approach, and try to bend Starfleet rules when he has difficulty in controlling the Maquis and Cardassian crew. The crew’s teamwork is put to the test when the Doctor breaks down as the infection spreads through other ship systems.​


Phage
The Odyssey encounters the Vidiians, the “pariah” of this region of the Delta Quadrant, when they steal Falox’s lungs. The Doctor is able to save Falox, but he is confined to Sickbay, only able to talk, as the Doctor creates a pair of artificial lungs for him. Odyssey tracks the Vidiians down, finding that they suffer from an incurable degenerative disease called the Phage that forces them to harvest organs from other species in order to survive. The Vidiians express remorse at having stolen Falox’s lungs, and Janeway offers to help them find a cure for their disease in exchange for their not using the crew as organ “donors”. The Vidiians offer to help Falox, providing them with the medical expertise to transplant a lung from another crew member to Falox, something the Doctor thought impossible, due to Falox’s physiology. Kes, Falox’s partner, provides the lung, and the Vidiians decide to travel with Odyssey to provide medical assistance, while they try to find a cure for the Phage.​


Vengeance
The smaller Kazon sects and the Trabe discover Odyssey’s plan to supply them both with weapons, to maintain safe passage, causing them to unite against Odyssey for using them for their own gain. Janeway tries to explain that she was unaware of the plan to supply the Kazon, and the deal had been done in good faith, but finds that the Trabe and Kazon do not accept this. As they near the edge of Kazon/Trabe space, the Odyssey makes a mad dash for safety, hoping that they will not be pursued further.​

The Trabe attack, disabling the Odyssey’s warp core, and boarding the ship. The Trabe plan to use the Odyssey as a weapon to win their war. The crew are sent to the Vidiian ship, and ordered to leave. However, despite the Vidiian ship’s lack of weaponry, they decide to go after the Odyssey, and beam over an away team, as the ship’s shields are still down.​

Evek, Torres, Seska and Tuvok are sent over to begin recapturing the ship, using their knowledge of the inner workings to their advantage. They retake one of the transporter rooms to bring in reinforcements if they require them, and start to section off the ship with force fields to retake it in sections.​

Meanwhile, the Odyssey joins with the rest of the Trabe fleet to destroy the Kazon Alliance fleet, as they begin to turn the tide of battle. As the away team secures the Odyssey again, they take out the Trabe, and hail the Kazon, coming to an agreement that they will not be attacked provided that the Odyssey no longer interferes in Kazon affairs.​

The Odyssey, under a skeleton crew, returns to the Vidiian ship, leaving Kazon space. As they ask Falox whose space they are nearing, he replies that the Sikarians control much of the local space indirectly, as a series of tributaries. As Janeway recalls having upset the Sikarians by the crew attempting to steal their technology, she realises that their troubles may have only just started.​
Recurring Cast: Martha Hackett as Seska​


A few alterations here that I didn't bring up earlier, either because I forgot or just hadn't quite finalised plans yet. One: Seska is Bajoran, not Cardassian. The Obsidian Order operative is Rejal, but she's not got a huge amount to do with that just yet. Two: Hydroponic bay doesn't get made until later, and the Doctor is highly involved with it. Also, in case you didn't guess, the Sikarians are going to be Season 2's big bad, with the Vidiians playing a major role. Right, next update will be next Monday, with some DS9. I'll still answer questions and respond to comments here and there, but don't expect anything major until then.
 
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Based on that dialogue, I’m guessing you’ve watched Certifiably Ingame’s recent Voyager episode. Nothing wrong with patching a few plot holes there though.

The kazon were probably the weakest and most annoying part of voyager so nice to see them being finished early. Season 2 otl contains some quite good stories inter-spliced with real clunkers. The Tuvix episode could easily be rewritten for Seska and Rejal
 

Timelordtoe

Monthly Donor
Based on that dialogue, I’m guessing you’ve watched Certifiably Ingame’s recent Voyager episode. Nothing wrong with patching a few plot holes there though.

The kazon were probably the weakest and most annoying part of voyager so nice to see them being finished early. Season 2 otl contains some quite good stories inter-spliced with real clunkers. The Tuvix episode could easily be rewritten for Seska and Rejal
Yeah, I watched Certifiably Ingame's Voyager episode. I also discussed it a bit with @The Chimera Virus, hence the decision to actually address it in dialogue. I could see "Sejal" working as a story, especially with two species that opposed to each other.
 
I'm a bit confused, can we get a list of what everyone's job/station is on the Odyssey?

Also, does the Odyssey's bridge have a layout closer to the Enterprise-D/E with three chairs in the middle, so Janeway is flanked by Evek and Chatan
 
The Obsidian Order operative is Rejal, but she's not got a huge amount to do with that just yet.
Called it. The question is, how much do the crew know about her working for the Obsidian Order?

Also, it occurred to me that one of the more prominent recurring characters in Odyssey might be an Ensign-equivalent from the Cardassian crew, as then there'd be a sense of symmetry with there being a commanding officer, lieutenant, and ensign from each of the three groups.
 
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