"Where Are We Going This Time": The Golden Age of Science Fiction

What should happen with the season summary updates?

  • Continue as is (might delay other updates)

    Votes: 6 75.0%
  • Release them later, as supplementary material

    Votes: 2 25.0%
  • Cut out the OTL bits, only say what you've changed (might only be a temporary solution)

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Stop them completely

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    8
  • Poll closed .
Nice opening for DS9 there!

Is the backstory for Sisko’s the same? Borg, Jennifer etc?
That was my plan. The tense scene between Picard and Sisko in "The Emissary" really doesn't work if Sisko doesn't have a massive personal loss as Wolf 359. To add a little more, Sheridan's wife died in childbirth, rather than as a result of some battle.

Hope Garak's characterization isn't turned dark--Robinson fought that hard, given that his typecasting after he played Scorpio (one of the scariest villains in a movie) in the first Dirty Harry; IRL, Robinson was a pacifist who flinched every time he fired the gun, IIRC (and he got numerous death threats after the movie came out)...
I don't want to make Garak too dark, but I do plan on making use of his past with the Obsidian Order. It gave us many brilliant moments, such as his comments in "Our Man Bashir" about his work with that group. Still, I plan on taking the characters in more of the direction that they wanted them to. I intend to keep Garak as the token morally grey one, who isn't affraid to get his hands a little dirty to do the right thing. He and Amoros (Bashir) will be spending a lot of time together.

All aboard the Garashir train!
I must admit that I thought it was a particularly good pairing, and that it would have worked better than the Bashir-Ezri stuff we got at the very end. The ship name will be different ITTL, as Bashir is Amoros. But the fact that that was where both Siddig and Robinson wanted to take their characters at the end (I recall reading somewhere that they tried to make it seem like Bashir and Garak were having an affair in the last season), especially if you read the screenplay for "The Nexus", a play they wrote and perform at conventions. Garak is one of my favourite characters in DS9, so he'll be getting plenty of time on the screen.


As an aside, I thought I'd clear up what Kelly's job is on Deep Space Nine, though none of you had asked. While his job title is the same as Worf's when he came on the station, his actual duties are a little different. As Strategic Operations officer, right now he's basically acting as Air Traffic Control for the wormhole. In addition, he's sort of the liason between the station and any Starfleet vessels that need to pass through, which is mainly the Lakota.
 
I'm interested in seeing more LGBT stuff in this DS9. Both Dax and Garek had a lot of potential for that part of them being explored.
I would quite like to see a gay Klingon and how that culture deals with such a thing.

Sure, it might be like a lot of 'macho' cultures and ignored as just 'bros getting relief' or it could be the antithesis of everything the culture expects, and thus hidden or causes exile.

Also more named Aliens in the show would be great. The main cast are fantastic, but mostly Human, or near-Human, exploring some of the background species we saw like the tailheads, or the unseen officer who had eggs hatch or bringing in some of seldom seen species like Caitians , or Ursinoids would really anchor the show in Trek history.
 
I'm interested in seeing more LGBT stuff in this DS9. Both Dax and Garek had a lot of potential for that part of them being explored.
OTL's DS9, intentionally or not, draws some (very soft) parallels between the Trill and the transgender community. I remember specifically the episode where Ezri returns home for the first time after being joined (speaking of, I wonder if she'll show up here eventually. Even if she isn't dax, the actress was underutilized imo and a space station constantly under siege could use a counselor).

Nice to see Strategic Operations Officer actually having duties, as Worf was basically just XO of the Defiant. Speaking of, you may want to keep this secret, but since we almost certainly won't be seeing a main role for Word on DS9, will he have any other role to play post-tng?
 
I'm interested in seeing more LGBT stuff in this DS9. Both Dax and Garek had a lot of potential for that part of them being explored.
Yes, two characters that are (at least by their actors' interpretations) pan/omnisexual. DS9 always seemed like the show that flirted most openly with LGBT issues, especially in "Chimera", in part as it wasn't afraid to show characters with real prejudices. As in TTL there's already a canon bi character (Riker) and a canon lesbian (Dr. Henderson), I intend to explore those issues more openly than in OTL.

I would quite like to see a gay Klingon and how that culture deals with such a thing.

Sure, it might be like a lot of 'macho' cultures and ignored as just 'bros getting relief' or it could be the antithesis of everything the culture expects, and thus hidden or causes exile.

Also more named Aliens in the show would be great. The main cast are fantastic, but mostly Human, or near-Human, exploring some of the background species we saw like the tailheads, or the unseen officer who had eggs hatch or bringing in some of seldom seen species like Caitians , or Ursinoids would really anchor the show in Trek history.
My expectation is that Klingon culture would be okay with it, as while it seems to have some pretty heavy nationalistic tendencies, there isn't really a sign of a "create children for the father/motherland" type of ideal. I don't see being LGBT as being much of an issue if you're a Klingon, as long as you're an honourable warrior.

As for aliens, while I haven't really introduced any new named species, I have plans to, especially where they would be very "alien" in a way that Odo is. The main casts of shows going forward (and let's keep in mind that DS9 is still in its early days now) will tend to be majority alien, but I do also like the "silent diversity" that Star Trek has always done so well. I plan on bringing some previously mentioned races back in a pretty major way.

OTL's DS9, intentionally or not, draws some (very soft) parallels between the Trill and the transgender community. I remember specifically the episode where Ezri returns home for the first time after being joined (speaking of, I wonder if she'll show up here eventually. Even if she isn't dax, the actress was underutilized imo and a space station constantly under siege could use a counselor).

Nice to see Strategic Operations Officer actually having duties, as Worf was basically just XO of the Defiant. Speaking of, you may want to keep this secret, but since we almost certainly won't be seeing a main role for Word on DS9, will he have any other role to play post-tng?
As someone who is transgender, I find the character I relate to best on DS9 is Ezri. I'm of the opinion that "Prodigal Daughter" is a far better episode than most give it credit for, but that's because her returning home to her family the same but different is something I've had to deal with with family and friends. I'm aware that this is a very unpopular opinion, but I far prefer Ezri Dax to Jadzia. I have plans for Nicole de Boer, as she's a brilliant actress. Indeed, the space station could use a counselor, especially with what I have planned for the later seasons.

When I was making my plans for DS9, I did find myself asking what the Strategic Ops officer actually did, so thought I'd make it a bit clearer ITTL. Worf was a useful character for DS9, both for ratings and in bringing the Klingons into the show. However, as DS9 is shaping up to be the flagship show for UPN, it's unlikely that they'll need the ratings boost of a familiar face. Rest assured, the Klingons will be involved with DS9 in due course, but that may not necessarily be through Worf, and they may not be as major as in OTL.

I could see Nicole de Boer playing a member of the Lakota's crew or something tbh.
You posted this as I was writing this message, so well done on that. As I said before, I have plans for her. They may be involved with Star Trek, maybe not. I won't give anything away just yet.
 
My only issue with your first season of DS9 is their seems to be no influence of J. Michael Straczynski.
While I not expecting DS9 to be Babylon 5 in the Star Trek Universe, I would expect some ideas from that show to appear.
Some of the stories from Babylon 5 season one could be done on DS9 like Soul Hunter, infection, The War Prayer, Quality of Mercy , Grail and Believers.

Other could be done with some major changes ie "By any Mean Necessary" . I could see the workers at the Station docks , being Bajorans working under a contract. Sisko is worried that there may be violence on the Station over the worker conditions but he ordered by Star Fleet to not interfere as Star Fleet see it as a Local matter. "Police Forces' from Bajore come to the station to break up the strike that they see as illegal "by any mean Necessary" . Sisko has to find a loophole in his orders to prevent violence .
 
I would quite like to see a gay Klingon and how that culture deals with such a thing.

Sure, it might be like a lot of 'macho' cultures and ignored as just 'bros getting relief' or it could be the antithesis of everything the culture expects, and thus hidden or causes exile.

Also more named Aliens in the show would be great. The main cast are fantastic, but mostly Human, or near-Human, exploring some of the background species we saw like the tailheads, or the unseen officer who had eggs hatch or bringing in some of seldom seen species like Caitians , or Ursinoids would really anchor the show in Trek history.
I would suspect that Straczynski would have more Aliens on DS9. One of the goals that he stated he wanted when he started Babylon 5 was that their would be a large number of aliens seen in the background and that they would not just be Aliens with Funny Foreheads. So we should see that in DS9 in this timeline.
 
And I forgot to ask.
Originally Straczynski and Harlan Ellison were going to do a sequel to the Outer Limit Episode "Demon with a Glass Hand" for Babylon 5.
Some thing happen and we never got it but considering the reputation that Ellison has because of "City at the End of Forever". I could see that them doing that Sequel as a episode of DS9.
 
I really like Jadzia Dax and never really liked Ezri, but that might be because we never really got the time to know Ezri. Plus we thought Worf and Jadzia had something going, esp after Worf practically sacrificed his career to rescue her, and they where talking about children. Also her death was frankly badly done.

I'd like to get to know Ezri here without a slug, and then with one that isn't Dax to show off how different she becomes.
 
My only issue with your first season of DS9 is their seems to be no influence of J. Michael Straczynski.
While I not expecting DS9 to be Babylon 5 in the Star Trek Universe, I would expect some ideas from that show to appear.
Some of the stories from Babylon 5 season one could be done on DS9 like Soul Hunter, infection, The War Prayer, Quality of Mercy , Grail and Believers.

Other could be done with some major changes ie "By any Mean Necessary" . I could see the workers at the Station docks , being Bajorans working under a contract. Sisko is worried that there may be violence on the Station over the worker conditions but he ordered by Star Fleet to not interfere as Star Fleet see it as a Local matter. "Police Forces' from Bajore come to the station to break up the strike that they see as illegal "by any mean Necessary" . Sisko has to find a loophole in his orders to prevent violence .
To be honest, I should probably start including more Babylon 5 sooner rather than later. I neglected Straczynski this season, purely by accident, and I shouldn't have. I will likely use some of Babylon 5's stories here and there, going forward. I'm looking to see if it's on any streaming services here in the UK, if not, I may just buy the DVDs. I'd like to do the concepts justice. I'll be using more aliens in the show, as the Gamma Quadrant is an opportunity to show some of that "new life" that Starfleet's supposed to be seeking out. Once the Dominion started appearing in earnest, we saw very little of the Gamma Quadrant's inhabitants, and I thought that was a shame. So that will probably be different.

I'm working on the overview for Season 1 of DS9 at the moment, and that should be out within the hour.
 
To be honest, I should probably start including more Babylon 5 sooner rather than later. I neglected Straczynski this season, purely by accident, and I shouldn't have. I will likely use some of Babylon 5's stories here and there, going forward. I'm looking to see if it's on any streaming services here in the UK, if not, I may just buy the DVDs. I'd like to do the concepts justice. I'll be using more aliens in the show, as the Gamma Quadrant is an opportunity to show some of that "new life" that Starfleet's supposed to be seeking out. Once the Dominion started appearing in earnest, we saw very little of the Gamma Quadrant's inhabitants, and I thought that was a shame. So that will probably be different.

I'm working on the overview for Season 1 of DS9 at the moment, and that should be out within the hour.
Since "Believers" was written by David Gerrold, I would expect a version of that story to appear.
And Grail would have to be rewritten but since Bajor is a strongly religious world, it would be the type of place that a seeker of truth would go on a Grail Quest.


If you have not watch Babylon 5, I highly recommend it. It does take a little while to get things going but by Season Three, It is one of the best TV science Fiction shows ever.
Yes the CGI has not aged well but the characters and their interactions are great fun. And i love the story especially in season 3 and 4.
 
Overview of Season 1 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine
Overview of Season 1 of Star Trek: Deep Space Nine

Emissary
Commander Benjamin Sisko is assigned to command the Federation-governed space station Deep Space Nine following the Cardassian withdrawal from Bajor. Sisko is resentful of this assignment, as he is concerned about the well-being of his son, Jake Sisko. Upon arrival, he finds that the station has been stripped of all but its bare essential systems by the departing Cardassians. He meets the staff already on the station, including Major Kira, Odo, Chief O’Brien, and Lt. Kelly, the latter two of which have been dropped off by the Enterprise. O’Brien informs Sisko that Captain Picard is waiting for him on the Enterprise to give him his briefing. Sisko and Picard share a tense exchange, as Sisko blames Picard for his wife’s death at Wolf 359, where Picard tells Sisko that he is to “do everything, short of violating the Prime Directive” to ensure that Bajor is ready for entry to the Federation, while Sisko reveals he is planning on leaving Starfleet.​

Sisko convinces Quark to remain on the station to keep it active as a stopping point for ships passing through the area. Later, he is brought to the Bajoran spiritual leader, Kai Opaka, who informs him that he is the “Emissary”, a “Bajoran not of Bajor”, who is a messiah-like figure in Bajoran culture. She shows Sisko an “Orb” which lets Sisko relive the moment he met his wife for the first time. She entrusts Sisko with the Orb for him to study.​

Upon returning to the station, Sisko finds that the remainder of his staff have arrived, meeting Chief Medical Officer Dr. Julian Amoros, and reuniting with his new Science Officer, Lt. Jadzia Dax, a joined Trill whom Sisko had been friends with in their previous host. Sisko lets Dax study the Orb, who discovers a pattern of strange events in the Denorios Belt near Bajor. The station’s old Cardassian commander, Gul Dukat, visits the station, meeting Sisko.​

Dax and Sisko take a runabout to investigate the Denorios Belt while Odo disables the Cardassians’ sensors, so that they are not followed. Upon arrival at the location, they find themselves inside what they determine to be a stable wormhole, appearing inside the Gamma Quadrant, over 70 years away from Federation space. They return through the wormhole, but are stopped by an unknown force. Dax is sent back to the station, while Sisko is stuck in a white void.​

Dax relates the findings, and Major Kira orders that the station be moved to the mouth of the wormhole, to ensure Bajoran control of it. Dukat also detects the wormhole, and takes his ship to investigate it. When the staff of Deep Space Nine try to follow, however, they find that the entrance no longer opens. Three more Cardassian ships arrive, demanding to know what happened to Gul Dukat’s ship, dismissing the possibility of a wormhole. The Cardassian prepare for an assault after being delayed by O’Brien creating the illusion of the station being heavily armed.​

Inside the wormhole, Sisko communicates with the entities, who speak to him through images of his friends, family, and crew. When Dukat’s ship enters the wormhole, they are enraged and close the wormhole. Sisko discovers that the entities do not experience time in a linear manner, and tries to explain how linear time works. The aliens however, keep on taking him to the moment of his wife’s death, explaining that he “exists here”, and Sisko realises that he has been unable to move on from her death.​

As the Cardassians prepare to open fire, the wormhole opens again, and Sisko tows Dukat’s ship back with a tractor beam. Dukat orders that the Cardassians stand down, while Sisko reveals that he has negotiated with the wormhole aliens for safe passage through the wormhole. The Enterprise returns, responding to Kira’s request for aid. Sisko explains to Picard that he has had a change of heart, and intends to remain as the station’s commander.​
Guest Star: Patrick Stewart as Captain Julien Picard​


Lakota
The USS Lakota arrives at Deep Space Nine for resupply. Its captain, John Sheridan, meets with Sisko, and they find that they share certain experiences after they reveal that they are both survivors of Wolf 359. The Lakota was previously assigned to mapping out the Badlands, but is now to be a part of the Federation’s initial exploratory mission to the Gamma Quadrant. However, the ship soon finds itself suffering from computer failures, and Sheridan suspects foul play.​


Past Prologue
A former Bajoran terrorist, Tahna Los, arrives at Deep Space Nine, fleeing Cardassian ships. He requests political asylum, backed up by Major Kira, with whom he has ties. Later, Odo spots him talking with the Duras Sisters, who have just arrived on the station. Amoros, on the advice of his new friend the Cardassian tailor Garak, investigates, and discovers that Tahna is likely planning on constructing a bomb for unknown purposes.​
Guest Stars: Barbara Marsh as Lursa of Duras, Gwynyth Walsh as B’Etor of Duras​


A Man Alone
Odo spots a man on the station that he recognises as a smuggler during the days of the occupation. While Odo dislikes the man, Ibudan is seen as a hero by most of the Bajorans. Some time later, Ibudan is found dead in one of Quark’s holosuites, and the public soon blame Odo for his death, becoming increasingly unruly. Meanwhile, Keiko O’Brien sets up a school on the station, persuading Sisko, Rom, and Sheridan to enrol their children (Jake, Nog, and Anna respectively).​


Command Decisions
Admiral Gardener, Sisko’s commanding officer, contacts Sisko to tell him that Starfleet intends to send a new officer to Deep Space Nine to replace Odo as Chief of Station Security. Sisko objects, as Odo knows the Bajoran people better, and his shapeshifting ability offers him an advantage over other officers. Sisko and Odo put a case together for Odo to remain as the Chief of Security.​


Babel
While repairing the station’s replicators, an overworked and tired O’Brien unknowingly activates a device hidden in one of the replicators in the crew quarters. Soon after, he begins to show signs of aphasia, unable to comprehend speech or to speak comprehensively. When the condition spreads, Amoros suspects a virus may be at play, and sets about creating a cure, while Kira investigates the possibility of it being made by an old Bajoran terrorist cell.​


Captive Pursuit
A damaged vessel arrives through the wormhole, its pilot, Tosk, is the first known life form to visit from the Gamma Quadrant. O’Brien helps to repair his ship, finding evidence that it was fired on, but Tosk refuses to disclose any information, and is found stealing from a weapons locker. Soon, more aliens arrive, revealing that they are hunting Tosk. Under the Prime Directive, Sisko believes that he has no choice but to hand Tosk over, but O’Brien sets about helping him to escape.​


Q-Less
Dax returns from the Gamma Quadrant with a woman that Kelly recognises as Vash, from his time on the Enterprise. Unbeknownst to them, Q is also hiding in the vessel. While en-route back to Deep Space Nine, the runabout has a series of power failures, which continue on the station after their arrival. Quark arranges to auction Vash’s items off, while O’Brien warns Sisko that Q might be responsible for the power failures when he spots him. When the power drains increase in severity, a gravitational field begins to pull the station towards the wormhole.​


First Aid
Annoyed at a lack of trained nurses on the station, Amoros begins training Kelly to fill in for emergencies. Kelly and Amoros, while similar ages, have very different opinions of their positions on Deep Space Nine. While Amoros is excited to be doing medicine on “the frontier” that will offer him unique challenges, Kelly is having difficulty adjusting from the Enterprise and her relative luxuries. Kelly’s nursing skills are soon put to the test when multiple Bajorans are injured in a fight on the Promenade.​


Dax
Dax is abducted by aliens while on her way back to her quarters. The aliens nearly escape, but Amoros is able to raise the alarm, and their ship is caught by the station’s tractor beam. One of the abductors, Ilon Tandro, accuses Dax of having committed treason in her previous host, Curzon Dax. Sisko tries to stop the extradition on the grounds that Jadzia should not be punished for crimes that, in his view, she did not commit.​


The Passenger
Kira and Amoros respond to a distress call from a Kobliad freighter, rescuing a security guard, Kajada, but are unable to save her prisoner, Vantika. Despite Vantika’s clear death, Kajada is convinced that he is somehow still alive, and intending to hijack a shipment of deuridium, a rare compound that Kobliads need to survive. Dax and Amoros find that Vantika may have hijacked someone’s brain, while Vantika contacts Quark to hire mercenaries to hijack the shipment.​


Move Along Home
The senior crew prepare to undergo formal first contact with a species from the Gamma Quadrant called the Wadi. The Wadi forgo formalities, instead heading straight to Quark, to play games. After their leader, Falow, has a winning streak at Dabo, Quark rigs the game. Falow catches on, and challenges Quark to a “truly honest game” called Chula. Sisko, Kelly, Dax, and Kira find themselves in an abstract world, and when Odo reports them as missing, Quark realises that they are his pieces.​


Disparate Parts
After she falls ill with a new disease from the Gamma Quadrant, Amoros realises that he needs to separate Jadzia from Dax to treat and save them both. While they are separated and recovering, Jadzia and Amoros find themselves falling in love. However, in order for Jadzia to live, she must be rejoined with Dax. The two struggle with their feelings knowing that Jadzia will no longer reciprocate when Jadzia and Dax are rejoined.​


The Nagus
Zek, the Grand Nagus of the Ferengi Alliance, arrives on the station, taking an interest in Quark. Zek uses Quark’s bar to stage a conference, where he reveals that Quark will be his successor. Soon after, Zek dies, leaving Quark to adjust to his new position. Meanwhile, Sisko deals with his son’s friendship with Nog. At first, when Rom demands that Nog stops attending school, he is relieved, but find that this leads to Jake and Nog just spending more time together. Eventually, Zek is revealed to have faked his death, and Sisko is reassured when he finds Jake teaching Nog how to read.​


Vortex
Odo takes a Gamma Quadrant visitor called Croden into custody after he kills one of a pair of Miradorn twins. The surviving Miradorn, Ah-Kel, vows vengeance. Croden reveals that he knows of Odo’s people, and offers to take Odo to a colony of his people. Croden’s homeworld demands Croden’s return, and Odo takes him back to the Gamma Quadrant, pursued by Ah-Kel.​


Battle Lines
The Bajoran spiritual leader, Kai Opaka, visits Deep Space Nine, requesting a tour from Sisko. She subtly asks him to take her through the wormhole, which Sisko agrees to. While in the runabout, Sisko receives a distress signal, and they investigate. However, the runabout is brought down by a satellite around the planet they investigate, killing Opaka. On the planet, they find that the dead are brought back to life by nanomachines, but cannot leave the planet without dying. After help arrives in the form of Dax and Kelly, Opaka decides to stay on the planet to help the warring inhabitants make peace.​


The Storyteller
On Bajor, Bashir and O’Brien respond to a request for medical assistance, finding that a village’s spiritual leader, a man called the Sirah, is dying. The Sirah’s job is to stop a cloud-like creature called the Dal’Rok from destroying the village five nights a year. The Sirah stops the Dal’Rok on the penultimate night, but dies, naming O’Brien his successor. O’Brien is reluctant to take the role, seeking a way out. On the station, Jake and Nog help a young leader to negotiate a treaty.​


Progress
Bajor intends to tap the core of one of its moons for energy, which will render the moon uninhabitable. One elderly farmer, Mullibok, refuses to evacuate, and Kira goes to convince him. Kira grows to like Mullibok, but is unable to convince him to leave. Sisko tries to buy her time, but it is clear she will have to betray either Bajor or Mullibok. Meanwhile, Jake and Nog make a succession of trades to make a profit off of Quark’s surplus sauce he is unable to sell.​


If Wishes Were Horses
Dax observes heightened emissions from the nearby Denorios Belt. She and Sisko hypothesise that this is due to the increased traffic at Deep Space Nine. O’Brien reads his daugher, Molly, Rumpelstiltskin as a bedtime story, but soon Molly comes in, claiming that Rumpelstiltskin is in her room. O’Brien finds that this is the case. Meanwhile, an alternate Jadzia attempts to seduce Amoros, while Jake Sisko is followed home from the holosuited by Buck Bokai, a famous baseball player. Soon, the crew find that their wishes are coming true, but an anomaly threatens the station.​


The Forsaken
Deep Space Nine plays host to a group of Federation ambassadors, including Betazoid Ambassador Troi. When Odo captures a thief that stole Troi’s broach, the Ambassador becomes infatuated with him, openly flirting with him. Meanwhile, a vessel comes through the wormhole and downloads a large amount of data onto the station’s computers. Soon, O’Brien finds that the computer is less hostile to him than normal, but it breaks down when he is not away. The crew hypothesise that the data is actually a non-sentient life form that has taken a liking to O’Brien. They question what to do while Bashir deals with the Ambassadors.​


The Leftovers
Lt. Kelly finds himself unable to move on from the death of his close friend Leslie Crusher. As he knows that many of his colleagues have experienced loss, he asks them for help with dealing with his grief. From this, he learns more about many of his commanding officers, and strikes up a friendship with Captain Sheridan.​


Dramatis Personae
A damaged Klingon vessel arrives through the wormhole. Moments before the ship explodes, a man beams onto the station, proclaiming “Victory!”, but dies moments later. Soon, the crew of the station find themselves clashing with each other, with the exception of Odo. While Kira plans a mutiny against Sisko, Odo plays both sides to try to come up with a cure for whatever is happening to the crew.​


Duet
A freighter docks at Deep Space Nine so that one of its passengers, Aamin Marritza, may receive treatment for a condition called Kalla-Norra. Kira objects, revealing that Kalla-Norra could only be developed if Marritza was present during a mining accident at the Gallitep mines during the Cardassian Occupation. She has Marritza arrested as a war criminal, but Sisko orders his release when it is revealed he is listed for no crimes. A photograph reveals that Marritza is actually Gul Darhe’el, to which the prisoner proudly admits. Cracks soon appearing in his story, however, and Kira continues interrogating him, confronted by her own prejudices.​


In the Hands of the Prophets
O’Brien and his wife walk along the Promenade, discussing her school, and how it teaches Bajoran culture. Keiko reveals that she teaches the scientific view of the wormhole and its inhabitants, rather than the Bajoran religious one. When one of her classes is interrupted by a Bajoran spiritual leader, Vedek Winn, she is questioned as to why she does not teach the Bajoran religion. When it becomes clear that religious tensions are rising on the station, the crew must stop an attack on another religious leader, Vedek Bareil.​
 
Hey everyone,

Thanks for continuing to leave your feedback and comments, I'm not sure I've ever seen the timeline this busy, and I love it. It's clear to me I need to make Deep Space Nine more Babylon 5-y, which I have no issue with. Going forward, expect more of that. Chalk this season up to good old "Early Installment Weirdness". Many of you have left interesting messages I intend to respond to, but it's nearly 1am for me, and it's been a very busy day for me, so I'll respond to you in the morning, after I've had the sleep I need.
 
Good season breakdown, but I echo some of the commentators about regarding it needing more JMS B5 touches- though perhaps his hand is more in the bits of these shows are cannot see here- the set, the aliens, the filming, the dialogue etc.

If DS9 is to be the flagship show of the new network, is more story Arcs going to be a thing? B5 was infamous for it and the 'soap opera' of it does draw viewers back each week to find out how the (often B) stories in the lives of their fav characters are going.

Love to see G'Kar and Mollari type characters on B5. Perhaps Gamma Quad worlds send Ambassadors to DS9? Or the other local minor powers send representatives as the Casdassians' power wanes? A Telepath like Bester might be interesting (terrifying?) as a Section 31 operative? Oh and Zathras, gotta be a place for poor Zathras!
 
On the one hand, good work with DS9. On the other hand, there might be no Psycho Janeway ITTL. I'm conflicted, but intrigued.
Yeah, TTL's equivalent to Voyager will be quite different. For those that really liked Voyager as we got it, they may not like it as much. Still, I think it's interesting if nothing else.

Good season breakdown, but I echo some of the commentators about regarding it needing more JMS B5 touches- though perhaps his hand is more in the bits of these shows are cannot see here- the set, the aliens, the filming, the dialogue etc.

If DS9 is to be the flagship show of the new network, is more story Arcs going to be a thing? B5 was infamous for it and the 'soap opera' of it does draw viewers back each week to find out how the (often B) stories in the lives of their fav characters are going.

Love to see G'Kar and Mollari type characters on B5. Perhaps Gamma Quad worlds send Ambassadors to DS9? Or the other local minor powers send representatives as the Casdassians' power wanes? A Telepath like Bester might be interesting (terrifying?) as a Section 31 operative? Oh and Zathras, gotta be a place for poor Zathras!
For this season, I'd say that Straczynski's hand is more of a background figure, as Berman and Piller will have definitely tried to dominate on the story side of things.

We will see more story arcs. They're something I really like, and probably the big reason why I just adore the later seasons of DS9.

As for Ambassadors, you've actually hit something I was planning on doing in the next two seasons. You could think of the Wormhole sort of being like the Channel Tunnel. It acts as the border in a way, but it's governed from the Alpha Quadrant side. As a result, the Alpha Quadrant powers will want to send representatives there to have their say in the event of a major incident. We may see a couple of Gamma Quadrant diplomats, but maybe not a full Ambassador. As for Section 31, they will be making appearances. I love how they were portrayed during DS9, and there's a couple of things that may be related to Section 31 that have happened recently. I may have to include a Betazoid Section 31 operative.

I'll probably try to find a way to work Zathras in, perhaps as a Gamma Quadrant native.

I don't want to give too much away, but Deep Space Nine is a show I intend to do a lot with. One little update on the beginnings of the creation of a follow-on series to TNG (TTL's Voyager equivalent) and a little on the films, then some Doctor Who.
 
Chapter XLVI: "So, What Next?"
Part II, Chapter XLVI: "So, What Next?"

As preparations were being made for Star Trek: The Next Generation’s eighth and final season, one question was asked more than any other by the production crew: “What’s next”. While Deep Space Nine was being eyed up by the executives at Paramount as a potential “flagship” show for their new network, UPN, its large differences from “traditional” Star Trek led the producers to begin working on a new show to begin airing the year after The Next Generation’s eighth season, to take its place in syndicated television. [1]


What this new show was to be was the cause of many discussions, as writers argued back and forth over their ideas. One common theme however, was the return to a starship, as opposed to the space station that Deep Space Nine was set on. But despite this, it was clear that the crew needed to be less united than the crew of the Enterprise, and should be set away from the familiar regions of space.

As Deep Space Nine had opened up the Gamma Quadrant, the decision was made that the new show would take place in the Delta Quadrant. In many Star Trek shows before, a ship had been sent to a far off region of space, only to be miraculously returned to its origin at the end of the story. The new show was to explore what would happen if it became stranded there, and had to make its own way back.

With this new concept, the writers came up with an apt title for the show Star Trek: Odyssey. The basic premise would be that the USS Odyssey, an Intrepid-class vessel, would be stranded in the Delta Quadrant, forced to make a 70 year trip back to Federation space. However, the crew needed something clear to divide them. [2]

For this, the writers decided to play off of the rivalry between the Cardassians and the Federation in the show. They would introduce a group of disgruntled colonists whose planets were ceded to the Cardassians in a border treaty, called the Maquis. The Maquis would act as a rebelling force against both the Cardassians and Federation, with many defecting Starfleet officers filling their ranks. The Odyssey, after arriving in the Delta Quadrant, would find two disables ships, one Cardassian, and one Maquis. After they become stranded, the three crews are forced to work as one, with open distrust between the groups. [3]

While casting would come later, the rough plans for the show had been laid down, and the intention was for the show to begin airing in early 1996.


As for the cast of The Next Generation, the success of the show meant that the producers were eager to have them involved in the film franchise, to take over from the Original Series crew. While a full crossover had been considered, the question as to who would be the main star caused some issue, and there was concern that certain members of the cast would not get a chance to shine.

Therefore, the decision was made to split this film into two stories. Both would deal with an abandoned, but highly advanced, base within an asteroid, which the crew of the Enterprise-E would later determine to be Iconian in origin. The story would be told in part by Spock, as he relates the events that led to the presumed death of Captain Kirk. [4]

The film would see the crew of the Enterprise-A discovering the asteroid, investigating it, but eventually being forced to leave Kirk and the away team behind or risk losing the ship. Spock and Scotty would later work together, having reunited in the 24th century, determining that the asteroid could be investigated once more, with the far more advanced Enterprise-E.

The film was to be made immediately after the final season of The Next Generation wrapped, with a planned release for November 1995. [5]


With the 1990s in full swing, it seemed like Star Trek was going to be much bigger than ever before.


[1] No opening quote for this one.
[2] So, right now it looks like a renamed Voyager, but it will be quite different.
[3] I think that the Maquis and Federation were a little too similar to properly cause the tension that was needed on the show, so I've added a Cardassian element. It's a case of emenies having to work together towards a common goal.
[4] Once again, I'm using an idea proposed to me by @Ogrebear. I'm less familiar with the TOS crew, so I appreciate the help.
[5] Sort of like Generations. The fact that the TNG crew will only need to film about half of the scenes will help.
 
Chapter XLVII: "Nine Lives"
Part II, Chapter XLVII: "Nine Lives"

“We, well I, took the story in a bit of a different direction during Avery’s run, and I think that’s a big part of why it’s so divisive. Anyway, I took it the way I wanted to, and not everybody liked that, certainly not the higher ups at NBC. So that’s why things ended the way that they did.”​
- Andrew Cartmel, showrunner for season 28 of Doctor Who, taken from An Adventure in Space and Time.

The position that the producers of Doctor Who were in now was not an unfamiliar one. A new Doctor, new companion, and a new direction for the show. They had all dealt with this three years prior, to mixed results. However, their actors were more proven now, and they were coming off the back of their most successful story yet. Worries about the audience leaving were far lower than they had been during the beginning of Siddig’s run.


Once more, showrunner Andrew Cartmel would attempt to delve into the past of the Gallifreyans once more, after his failed attempt during Season 25. It was his hope that with a pairing that worked better together, his ideas would be better received by the fans and producers. He was hesitantly given the go-ahead by the executives at NBC, and got to work on these new stories. [1]

There would be some major differences over past seasons. Firstly, while the Doctor had just regenerated, he would not be dealing with post-regenerative trauma in his debut story. The reason for this would not be explained, but various sources in a state of “grey-canonicity” would offer explanations in the following years. Secondly, the season would feature a slight return to the educational origins of the show, as the Doctor takes Jennifer on board to help with her education. [2]

As a result, many scenes in this season would take place at the University of Washington in Seattle, where the Doctor is posing as a Professor of Physics. This would, in part, be due to Seattle being built over a “rift”, which allowed for an ease of travel through time and space. [3]


Following the success of Season 27, the writers decided to bring back more characters from previous seasons, with many old friends and foes making appearances once more. Gallifrey playing a more central role would mean that Romana would continue to make guest appearances, after she returned there at the end of “Closed Circle”. The Monk would also appear in this season, also pretending to be a Professor.

The Master would make a return, but J. E. Freeman was uninterested in continuing in the role if he was not working with Siddig El-Fadil. As both the Doctor and companion were now being portrayed by American actors, the BBC producers insisted on casting a British actor as the Master. They eventually settled on veteran stage actor Sir Derek Jacobi, who agreed to take on the role. [4]


Avery Brooks, who was to play the Ninth Doctor, was relatively well known among American audiences at the time of his casting, unlike his two immediate predecessors. Likewise, Winona Ryder, who would play his companion Jennifer, was also well known. As a result, executives were more confident in their ability to keep the audience hooked, and hoped that their names would draw in some people who had not seen the show before.

It was clear from pre-season interviews that the two would work well together, though the hype for the new season would be tempered somewhat by allegations of a falling out between showrunner Andrew Cartmel and much of the writing staff over the direction that Doctor Who was to take in the future. This was not the first time such a clash had occurred, but given that they had led to the poor Season 25, many fans worried about the future of the show. [5]


And so 1994 would see Doctor Who beginning to fall into chaos. [6]


[1] So, the Cartmel Masterplan is back. But the executives aren't too keen on the idea, given how it went last time.
[2] By "grey-canon", I mean stuff like TTL's books and audio stuff, if it ever gets made. The two major explanations will be; 1: Time has passed since The Dark Dimension, and so the Doctor is recovered; 2: As the Doctor's regeneration was voluntary, and he did not need to "repair" his body, he just doesn't go through it (per Romana's regeneration).
[3] I'll explain more when I get to the episodes. It will be like a cross between "School Reunion" and the job the Twelfth Doctor had during Series 10.
[4] I've always wanted to see more of a Jacobi Master on screen since the little bit we saw in "Utopia". He's active and gets a knighthood in 1994, so that's something.
[5] I see Cartmel's plans clashing with what a lot of the writers want to do. So this happens.
[6] More on this next time.
 
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