I have a feeling that ABC's current power struggles are going to bleed into more productions, not just this one. It'll be interesting to see how Masked Rider will deal with these troubled times.
 
Given one of the things I am working on for the fan submission thread, I actually have an idea in mind for Scary Stories.
Maybe Ted Turner should take a crack at it instead? Captain Planet was awesome and so is Cartoon TV. Maybe have multiple departments and multiple animation styles for each story, like Cartoon Sushi.
 
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No one can call Saban a bully? He ran non-union productions with all the problems that entailed and was perfectly fine with stiffing his casts on pay and letting them get harassed by production staff. He was not well-loved, lol.
 
No one can call Saban a bully? He ran non-union productions with all the problems that entailed and was perfectly fine with stiffing his casts on pay and letting them get harassed by production staff. He was not well-loved, lol.
From what I've heard, he ironed those issues out over time. Some of them weren't even 100% his fault. Either way, it's a shame he and Fox Kids dropped out of the game. Saturday mornings were never the same since. Jetix was fine, but it could never replace the old channel for me anyway. By the time Saban got back in, he was way out of practice. IMO though, Glitter Force was a great return to traditional dubbing practices while it lasted. Very nostalgic.

Incidentally, I screwed up the dates a little regarding Bio-Force, so here's how I see it: Jamie's son came in as a fan around the time the Turboranger adaption, Bio-Force: Turbo Charged was on the air in 91. However, he didn't become a mega-fan until Mastermind in 92.

Man Goosebumps and Grizzly Tales competing directly on the bookshelfs?
More like on the Screen. Stein is a writing machine compared to Rix, who currently has only 2 books under his belt as of now. Expect him to write Fearsome Tales for Fiendish Kids a year earlier than IOTL, just to keep the show going, followed by his final book. ''Eerie Tales for Evil Kids.''
 
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Going from high end cult fantasy to kryptonian nipples eh
Actually Joel Schumer didn't do the nipples because "it fits more with a leather boy like Batman" and also he dies way way earlier due to HIV (ironically a few years before the drugs that would have saved him were invented) and Superman 2 was his blaze of glory, for all his faults Joel Schumer was a good director and he put his all in the movie because he was dying.
 
Actually Joel Schumer didn't do the nipples because "it fits more with a leather boy like Batman" and also he dies way way earlier due to HIV (ironically a few years before the drugs that would have saved him were invented) and Superman 2 was his blaze of glory, for all his faults Joel Schumer was a good director and he put his all in the movie because he was dying.
Ah ok then rip Joel Schumacher ITTL
 
Election '94 Live Coverage
Republican “Surge” and Reform “Uprising” Shake Up DC

Republicans Make Large Gains in House, Senate

Insurgent Reform Party claims Several Seats

Washington Post, November 9th, 1994


Washington – The Republican Party made substantial gains in last night’s election, picking up 42 seats in the House and 4 in the Senate while Ross Perot’s insurgent Reform Party gained 8 House seats and 3 Senate seats, with the Democrats now holding a razor-thin margin in the House of Representatives and Senate. Furthermore, GOP and Reform candidates won several closely contested State races, including several governorships. Buoyed by grass roots opposition to the policies of the Al Gore administration (including NAFTA, which Reform has strongly opposed, and the controversial Green Growth Act, which many Republicans have lambasted as a waste of taxpayer dollars and Federal Government overreach) and boosted by a huge upswing in evangelical “values voters”, the Republican “Surge” and Reform “Uprising” are expected to severely hamper attempts by the Gore administration to build on their legislative accomplishments. Furthermore, the razor thin Democratic majorities have placed the Reform Party into an enviable position as potential kingmakers for a variety of legislative priorities for both larger parties.

The Republican agenda, as spelled out in Newt Gingrich’s “Contract for America”, sets out several areas of focus for the Republican agenda, including fiscal restraint, tough stances against crime, and reduction of Federal regulations. They also promise to oppose further growth of the Federal Deficit and Debt, scale back or eliminate the GGA, and oppose the Democratic-led efforts in health care policy. Most Republican candidates also engaged in social/cultural conversations, professed Christian faith and an opposition to Affirmative Action, welfare spending, and other "social safety net" issues, tighter controls on immigration (particularly "illegal immigrants"), and opposition to abortion.

The Reform agenda, meanwhile, includes overturning or hobbling NAFTA and other Free Trade initiatives, strengthening US farming and manufacturing, jobs creation, reduction of regulatory “red tape”, balancing the budget, increasing enforcement on drugs and gang violence, election reform (such as term limits, open primaries and ranked choice ballots, and elimination of the Electoral College), campaign finance reform, decentralization of power to States and localities, and implementing measures to “strengthen direct voter participation in the democratic process” to include the increased use of popular referendums on issues and “virtual town halls”. They had no cohesive stance on social issues, which varied heavily by region.

The House of Representatives will now sit at 220 Democrats (one of whom, Bob Schuster of Wyoming, is a so-called “Reform Democrat”), 206 Republicans, and 8 Reform, with one Independent (Sanders of Vermont), who is expected to caucus with the Democrats. These Republican gains are largely thanks to high voter turnout in rural areas, “coal country”, and more fiscally conservative suburban districts, and likely would have been significantly higher had it not been for competition from Reform Party candidates, who also cost the Democrats several key races, such as California Senator Peter Wilson’s upset win over Gray Davis. Several key Senate Seats were captured by the GOP as well, including Florida and Michigan, while Reform grabbed seats in Maine, Minnesota, and Vermont and the Democrats managed to barely hold on to seats in Montana, Rhode Island, Virginia, Wyoming, and their two seats in Tennessee (one a special election to fill President Gore’s former seat) in tighter-than-expected races[1]. Things are further complicated in Wyoming, where the State Democratic Party has made common cause with the Reform Party, with populist Senator John Vinich and Representative Bob Schuster now calling themselves “Reform Democrats”. Both are expected to continue to caucus with the democrats, but are likely to side with Reform and the GOP on several key issues. This gives the Democrats a thin 54-43-3 Senate margin[2] and gives Reform and moderate Senators of both major parties a bully pulpit from which to demand whatever changes to a given bill that they want.

Similarly, the Republicans made several gains in State-level races, taking the Governor’s Seats in Georgia, Illinois, Michigan, New York, Pennsylvania, Maryland, Kansas, and New Mexico. Democrats barely held on in Alabama, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Tennessee, Texas, and Vermont in tighter-than-expected races thanks to Reform candidates. Reform Candidates took the governor’s chair in Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island.

For example, Texas Governor Ann Richards faced a particularly tight reelection, just winning out against Jack Fields (R) and Keary Ehlers (Ref). Political analysts say it came down to strong urban dislike for Ehlers and a higher-than-expected number of Democratic voters in the north and panhandle of the state[3], the latter largely assumed to be the recipients of new jobs installing renewable power sources and their supporting infrastructure as part of the Green Growth Act. Fields in particular had aggressively attacked the GGA and Richards for supporting it, which played well for him in the suburban counties and with petroleum workers, much as his professed faith motivated evangelical voters, while Ehlers took a more nuanced approach to the GGA, praising the jobs but criticizing the cost. But Richards fired back against these attacks on the GGA, most notably in the 2nd gubernatorial debate where she quotably stated to Fields, “That ‘big government waste’ as you like to call it just brought millions of dollars and thousands of jobs to North Texas and the Panhandle! And while I’m sure that you and some of your multimillionaire Dallas oil buddies don’t think that matters much, it’s life and death for the fine folks of North Texas!”

Things went better for Former President George Bush’s son John “Jeb” Bush, who won a close victory in the Florida Senate race over Democrat Buddy McKay. The victory bodes well for the Republicans going into the 1996 election, who underperformed in the critical state of Florida in 1992, winning over Gore on a razor-thin margin.

In Pennsylvania, Senator Heinz’s coattails pulled Republican gubernatorial candidate… Cont’d on A2.


House of Representatives:

genusmap.php

US House: Color represents the depth of each party's control. The lighter the shade the closer to 50%, the darker the shade the closer to 100%. Gray states are split. Green is Reform and Bernie Sanders. (Electoral maps from “usaelectionatlas.org”)

House of Representatives:
Democrats: 220 [With 1 Democratic Reform] (-50)
Republicans: 206 (+42)
Reform: 8 (+8)
Independent: 1 [4]

House Leadership:
Speaker: Dick Gephardt (D-MO)
House Majority Leader: David Bonior (D-MI)
House Majority Whip: Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) [5]
House Minority Leader: Dick Armey (R-TX)
House Minority Whip: Tom Delay (R-TX)
Reform Leader: John Michael (Ref-ME)


Senate:

genusmap.php

US Senate: Dark Blue: Democratic Pickup; Light Blue: Democratic Hold; Dark Red: Republican Pickup; Light Red: Republican Hold; Green: Reform Pickup

US Senate:
Democrats: 54 [With 1 Democratic Reform] (-6)
Republicans: 43: (+3)
Reform: 3 (+3) [6]
(Recall that Texas flipped to the GOP in 1993, so the Senate is 60-40 going into the 1994 election)

Senate Leadership:
President Pro Tempore: Robert Byrd (D-WV)
Majority Leader: Jim Sasser (D-TN)
Majority Whip: Wendell Ford (D-KY)
Minority Leader: Bob Dole (R-KS)
Minority Whip: Trent Lott (R-MS)
Reform Leader: Angus King (Ref-ME)[7]


Governors:

genusmap.php

Gubernatorial Changes: Dark Blue: Democratic Pickup; Light Blue: Democratic Hold; Dark Red: Republican Pickup; Light Red: Republican Hold; Dark Green: Reform Hold; Light Green: Reform Pickup


genusmap.php

US Governors 1994: Blue = Democrat, Red = Republican, Green = Reform or Independent



1994 Governor Elections:
Republicans: 22 (+8)
Democrats: 21 [With 1 Democratic Reform] (-13)
Reform: 7 (+5) [8]



Voters Send Mixed Signals on Gay Rights Debate
The New York Times, November 25th, 1994

Guest Post by @jpj1421 [9]


Across the nation Republicans made gains in local, State, and Federal elections built on a platform of economic conservatism and “traditional American values". Often this latter aspect involved conservative activists vocally denouncing gay rights and their supposed promotion by major Hollywood studios.

Gary Bauer, President of the Family Research Council, said about gay political groups, “they’ve imbedded themselves into every part of our culture. Even Disney is putting out their ideology. And now they're using taxpayer funds to promote their gay lifestyle.” He went on to say that it is imperative for newly elected officials to promote what he called “Christian values.”

Conservative activists point to this upswell in opposition to gay rights, but gay rights activist point to the final result, Democrats holding Congress and the election of an openly gay Attorney General in New York, as a sign of growing tolerance. Conservatives did see advances nationally as many more moderate Republicans lost primaries, including high profile Senators like Jim Jeffords and John Chaffee. While a number of those conservative Republicans would go on to lose in the general elections, most notably in Senate races, a number of historically Democratic districts flipped to the Republican Party, even ones that had continued to vote for Democrats for Congress even as they supported Republican candidates for President. This was especially true in the South, where many voters surveyed felt that fellow southerner President Gore had embraced extremely liberal policies since his election, including on gay rights, in particular his ending of the ban on gays and lesbians serving in the military.

Gay rights activists, meanwhile, pointed to the retained Democratic majority in Congress, the rejection anti-gay rights initiatives in Oregon and Idaho[10], and the first openly gay elected state official as signs of growing tolerance. California has had an openly gay Acting Secretary of State since May when March Fong Eu, who held the post for nearly twenty years, was made Ambassador to Micronesia[11] resulting in the elevation of the openly gay Deputy Tony Miller. Miller ran for his own term, but lost in a narrow election to Republican State Representative Bill Jones 34.8 - 32.9 with Reform candidate Margaret Garcia getting 26 percent[12]. New York City Family Court Judge Karen Burstein, meanwhile, became the first openly lesbian statewide official elected to office in a narrow, and incredibly contentious, election. Her 42.2-41.9 victory[13] over Republican US Attorney Dennis Vacco was notable for what the New York Times called “gutter politics” as a supporter of Mr. Vacco, Staten Island Borough President Guy Molinari alleged that Ms. Burstein was not qualified to be Attorney General because she is a lesbian[14]. This election, albeit narrow, is seen as a major achievement for the gay rights movement.

A Democratic polling firm found that many swing voters were more worried about a “religious right-wing agenda” than…. Cont’d on A3.



Chapter 4: Reform on the Rise (Cont’d)
From Swirling Colors: The Rise of Political Populism in the Nineties, by Steve Kornacki


And in November of 1994 Reform struck and struck hard. Numerous “safe races” were thrown into doubt as the Reform candidates grabbed votes from both sides and brought in new voters not otherwise inclined to participate. Numerous sure-fire races were flipped, such as California Republican Senator Peter Wilson’s upset win over Democrat Gray Davis. Several races went to Democrats or Reform candidates that might have otherwise gone to Republicans, possibly costing the GOP a chance at a narrow control of the House. And most tellingly, eight House seats, three Senate seats, and five Governor’s chairs went to Reform, with Senator Ben Nighthorse Campbell of Colorado later leaving the Democrats for Reform following a rift with the Colorado Democratic Party[15]. So potent was the Reform movement in Wyoming that populist Democrat John Vinich made common cause, soon declaring himself a Reform Democrat. He’d be joined in this political “dual-citizenship” by Representative Bob Schuster. Together they would redefine Wyoming politics.

The Reform Party, though small in the number of elected officials compared to the established major parties, would have a powerful position despite their relative size, effectively commanding the middle on several issues and forcing the two parties to accept Reform agenda items. Senator Angus King of Maine in particular gained notoriety as a kingmaker and deal-broker while the Frontier Populist duo of Vinich and Campbell rallied many a farm bill from committee purgatory. And Reform candidates would have a growing impact at the State and Local level, pushing through changes using grassroots energy and targeted compromise with the majority parties, often acting as a spoiler for the majority.

Reform would make many local alliances with other third parties, notably the Libertarians (particularly in the South and West) and the Greens (particularly in the Northeast). They absorbed the Alaska Independence Party in whole. They made inroads in New York with the Liberal party and effectively absorbed the Connecticut Party in that state. It also stole many members and potential politicians from the U.S. Taxpayers’ Party[16].


Perot and Reform had commanded the headlines, driving commentators both left and right insane. SNL ran numerous sketches with Dana Carvey endlessly aping Perot’s cackling laugh, nasally voice, and endless use of charts and graphs. Even Sesame Street got into the action, introducing the character of Ross Parrot. President Gore was reportedly “taken aback” by the success of Reform, and he and his advisors began to worry about the increasingly likely possibility of a 1996 Perot Presidential run. And while the Democrats counted their blessings that the Reform Uprising had likely helped them narrowly keep the House and Senate in 1994, it had cost them several races (and nearly cost them others) and all were well aware that 1996 would be a completely different year, and that the spoiler effect could just as easily swing the other way. A number of Democrats, particularly in the West and Northeast, began to wonder if they should follow Vinich’s lead and make common cause with their state’s Reform Party.

skunk_political_logo-for_geekhis_khan-fg-png.736231

(Image by @FriendlyGhost)

And Perot looked on in amusement, his friends and colleagues noting him to be “quite smug” about the whole thing. Cartoonist Pat Oliphant captured the moment in a landmark political cartoon that showed a smugly grinning Perot as a skunk, trailing a cloud of populist demands past a gagging anthropomorphic elephant and donkey, saying “Pardon me for makin’ a stink…” The cartoon would be celebrated by the Reform party, who soon replaced their interim Bald Eagle mascot with that of a skunk[17].

And as the Gore administration dealt with the “stink” of populism, Perot and the Reform Party, emboldened, once again set their sights on 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.



[1] In our timeline the “Republican Revolution” led to the Republicans dominating the House 230-204 and taking the Senate 52-48. This was largely driven by extreme grassroots dislike for Bill Clinton. Seriously, it is hard to overstate just how much conservatives hated (and still hate) both Bill and Hillary Clinton, and how much this motivated conservative backlash and our timeline’s 1994 Republican Revolution. And while Gore’s GGA remains controversial in this timeline, in particular losing the Democrats some ground in Coal and Oil Country and in automotive industry paces like Michigan and Ohio, Gore “the bore” is far less controversial than “Slick Willie” Clinton was in our timeline. The Republicans also had a larger deficit to overcome in both chambers thanks to a combination of factors such as Hart’s coattails in 1988, “Hartache” in 1990, and Gore’s less controversial personality in 1992.

On top of that, a surging Reform Party has upended several close races and claimed several seats in both chambers plus some governor’s seats! Note that without the Reform surge, the GOP would have very narrowly taken the House (218 R to 216 D plus Bernie) and come quite close to taking the Senate (53 D to 47 R). And on top of that, random butterflies are adding up all through politics in this timeline. For example, the long series of random entertainment-industry events that led to Fred Thompson leaving lobbying to enter acting in our timeline – and then returning as a recognized TV and movie star to politics in Tennessee – are butterflied by all of the massive changes in the entertainment industry (recall that Kelsey Grammer played his role in Hunt for Red October). Instead, in this timeline Thompson never left politics and is now the District Attorney for the State of Tennessee with eyes on a Judge’s robes. President Gore’s campaigning and remaining popularity in Tennessee (the GGA is bringing a lot of money into the eastern parts of the state in particular) helped drag the Tennessee candidates to narrow victory, particularly without Thompson’s charisma and fame to run against.

Also recall that Senator John Heinz (R, PA) was not killed in a plane crash in 1991 in this timeline (his travel schedule, affected in part by his support of Disneytown Philadelphia and other regional economic changes, is totally different in this timeline) and thus he easily wins reelection in 1994.

Other notable wedge issues that drove the Republican Revolution not at play in this timeline are: the assault weapons ban (recall that it was not a part of the ’94 crime bill in this timeline), “Hillarycare” (recall that Gore and Speaker Tom Foley assembled a bipartisan committee to explore health care policy, as Gore wanted in our timeline), persistent rumors of affairs by the president (Gore does not appear to be a womanizer), and other “Slick Willy” corruption allegations (Gore seemed relatively untouched by scandal even under Clinton). And yet even without those major wedge issues and with Gore maintaining high approval from Democrats and middling approval from Independents, it’s typical for the opposition party to make gains in the “off year” elections (i.e. no Presidential race) and it’s worth remembering that the GGA and other Gore initiatives are still strongly disliked by conservatives, so a strong Republican showing in 1994 seems likely no matter what. And Hat Tip once again to @jpj1421 for the political assist.

[2] This lead will shrink further to 53-44-3 (D-R-Ref) after Senator Richard Shelby switches over to the Republican Party shortly after the election, as he did in our timeline. It will shrink even further to 52-44-4 when Sen. Ben Nighthorse Campbell of Colorado switches from Democrat to Reform in May of 1995 (he became a Republican in our timeline).

[3] Richards was competitive there in our timeline too, but George W. Bush won out statewide in our timeline by riding the Republican Revolution, which is muted in this timeline. Where’s W? Find out soon.

[4] Hat-tip to @jpj1421 for the election help.

Closest Races:
Texas 13th- D+.1- Bill Sarpalius(D) - 36.4, Mac Thornberry (R)- 36.3 - Democratic Hold
Tennessee 4th - R+.1 Van Hilleary (R) - 48.75, Jeff Whorley (D) - 48.65 - Republican Gain
New Hampshire's 2nd D+.2- Richard Swett (D) - 35.7 (D), Charles Bass (R) - 35.8, John Lewicke (Ref) - 28.1 Democratic Hold
California 27th - R+.2 - Carlos Moorhead (R)- 36.5, Doug Kahn (R) - 36.3, Bill Gibbs (Ref) -25 - Republican Hold
Alabama 5th - D+.2 - Robert Cramer (D) - 48.7, Wayne Parker (R)- 48.5 - Democratic Hold
Nebraska's 2nd - R+.3 - Jon Christensen (R) - 38.95, Peter Hoagland (D) - 38.65, Patricia Dunn (REF) - 21.3 - Republican Gain
Kentucky 3 - D+.3 - Mike Ward (D) - 40.2, Susan Stokes (R) - 39.9, Richard Lewis (Ref) - 20 - Democratic Hold
Rhode Island 1st - D+.4 - Patrick Kennedy (D) - 33.8, Buddy Cianci (Ref) - 33.4, Kevin Vigilante (R) - 32.8 - Democratic Gain
Louisiana 7th -R+.8 General Election: Rep Jimmy Hayes (D) - 46.6, Clyde Holloway (R) - 41.4, Ron Caser (Ref) - 12
Runoff Election: Clyde Holloway (R) - 50.4, Jimmy Hayes (D) - 49.6 - Republican Gain
Oklahoma 2nd - R+1.3 - Tom Coburn (R) - 37.1, Virgil Cooper (D) - 35.8 - Republican Gain
Indiana 8th - R+1.5 - John Hostettler (R) -40.4, Frank McCloskey (D) - 38.9 - Republican Gain
Nevada 1st- Ref+1.5- Gary Wood (Ref) - 37.5, James Bilbray (D) - 36.1, John Ensign (R) - 26.4 - Reform Gain
Kansas 3rd - R+1.7 - Jan Meyers (R) - 36.8, Frank Kaul (Ref) -35.1, Judy Hancock (D) -28.1 - Republican Hold
Pennsylvania 15th - R+1.7- Jim Yeager (R)- 39.7, Paul McHale (D) - 38, Victor J. Mazziotti (Ref) - 22.3 - Republican Gain
Idaho 1st -Ref +1.8 - Marion Ellis (Ref) -35.2 -Helen Chenoweth (R) - 33.4, Larry LaRocco (D) -31.4 - Reform Gain
Kansas 4th - Ref +2 - Seth Warren (Ref) - 35.1, Todd Tiahrt (R) - 33.1, Dan Glickman (D) - 31.8 - Reform Gain
Minnesota 6th - D+2 - Bill Luther (D) - 36.4, Tad Jude (R) - 34.2, Dean Barkley (Ref) - 29 - Democratic Hold
Kentucky 1st - R+2 - Ed Whitfield (R) - 46.8, Thomas Barlow (D) - 44.8 - Republican Gain
Arkansas 1st - D+2 - Blanche Lincoln (D) - 50, Warren Dupwe (R) - 48 - Democratic Hold
North Carolina 3rd - R+2.1 - Walter Jones (R) - 46.8, Martin Lancaster (D) - 44.7 - Republican Gain
New York 26th - D+2.4 - Maurice Hinchey (D) - 40.8, Bob Moppert (R) - 38.4 - Democratic Hold
New Jersey 8th - R + 2.4 - William Martini (R) - 44.3, Herb Klein (D) - 41.9, Bernard George (Ref) -13.9 - Republican Gain
Texas 9th D+2.5 - Jack Brooks (D) - 37.5, Steve Stockman (R) - 35, Bill Felton (Ref) - 26.5. - Democratic Hold
North Carolina's 4th - D+2.5 - David Price (D) - 47.3, Fred Heineman (R) - 44.2 - Democratic Hold
North Carolina 11th - D+2.8 -James Clarke (D) - 47, Robert Carpenter (R) - 44.2 - Democratic Hold
Minnesota 6th - D+2.8 - Bill Luther (D) - 36.7, Tad Jude (R) - 33.9 - Democratic Hold
Oregon 5th -D+3.2 - Catherine Weber (D) - 36, Jon Zimmer (Ref) - 32.8, Jim Bunn (R) - 31.1- Democratic Hold
South Carolina 5th - D+3.3 John Spratt (D) - 49.5, Larry Bigham (R) - 46.2 - Democratic Hold
Oregon 5th - D+3.5 - Catherine Weber (D) - 36.3, Jon Zimer (Ref) - 32.8, Jim Bunn (R) - 30.8 - Democratic Hold
California 11th - D+3.5 - Rep Patti Garamendi (D) -39.1, Richard Pombo (R) - 35.6, Joseph Miller (Ref) - 25.4 - Democratic Hold
North Carolina's 11th D+3.7- James Clarke (D) - 47.6, Lanier Cansler (R) - 43.9 - Democratic Hold
Nevada 2nd - R+3.6 - Barbara Vucanovich (R)- 41.4, Thomas Jefferson (Ref) - 37.8, Bill Verge (D) - 17.3 - Republican Hold
Florida 15th - R+ 3.8 - Dave Weldon (R)- 41.4, Sue Munsey (D) - 37.6 - Republican Gain
California 1st -D + 4- Rep Dan Hamburg (D) - 40.9, Frank Riggs (R)-36.8, Russell Chase (Ref) - 22.5 - Democratic Hold
Virginia 5th D+4 - Lewis Payne (D) - 47.8, George Landrith (R) - 43.8 - Democratic Hold
Ohio 13th D+4.2 Margaret Mathna(D) -37.9, Gregory White (R) - 33.7, Howard Mason (Ref) - 27.2 - Democratic Hold
California 4th D+4.3 - Rep Patricia Malberg (D) - 39.1, State Rep Dave Knowles (R) - 34.8, Damon Falconi (Ref) - 26.3 - Democratic Hold
Ohio 14th D+4.4 - Thomas Sawyer (D) - 40.7, Lynn Slaby (R) -36.3, Unnamed Reform Activist - 23.1 - Democratic Hold
Oklahoma 4th -R+4.4- JC Watts (R) - 36.6, Bill Tiffee (Ref) -32.2, David Perryman (D) - 31.2 Republican Gain
Washington 5th - R+4.6- George Nethercutt (R) -38.1, Tom Foley (D) - 33.5 - Republican Gain
New York 4th D+4.8 - Philip Schilirio (D) - 37.5, Dan Frisa (R) - 32.7, Robert Berkowitz - 13.3, David Levy © - 2.7 - Vincent P. Garbitelli (Right to Life) - 2.7 - Democratic Hold
Ohio 19th -R+4.9 Steve La Tourette (R)- 36.9, Eric Fingerhut (D) - 32, Ron Young (Ref) - 28.5 - Republican Gain
Montana - Ref +5 -Steve Kelly (Ref) - 42.4, Pat Williams (D) - 37.4, Cy Jamison (R) - 20.2, - Reform Gain

Changes from Our Timeline:
Alabama 2nd - George Wallace JR (R) [Switched parties earlier than in our timeline] - 62.6, Representative Faye Baggiano (D) - 34.6 - Republican Gain
Alaska - Joni Whitmore (Ref) - 48.2, John Devens(D)- 38.7, Arliss Sturgulewski (R) - 12.9 - Reform gain
California 1st - Rep Dan Hamburg (D) - 40.9, Frank Riggs (R) -36.8, Russell Chase (Ref) - 22.5 - Democratic Hold
California 4th - Rep Patricia Malberg (D) - 39.1, State Rep Dave Knowles (R) - 34.8, Damon Falconi (Ref) - 26.3 - Democratic Hold
California 10th - Rep Wendell Williams (D) - 42.8, William Baker (R) - 32.8, Craig Cooper (Ref) - 24.5 - Democratic Hold
California 11th - Rep Patti Garamendi (D) -39.1, Richard Pombo (R) - 35.6, Joseph Miller (Ref) - 25.4 - Democratic Hold
California 22nd - Rep Gary Hart (D) - 48.5, Andrea Seastrand (R) - 27.8, David Bersohn (Ref) - 24.6 -Democratic Hold
California 43st - Rep Mark Takano (D) - 42.6, Gene Berkman (Ref) - 28.6, Ken Calvert (R) - 28.2 - Democratic Hold
California 49th - Rep Lynn Schenk (D) - 40.2, Brian Bilbray(R) - 32, Chris Hoogenboom (Ref) -25.2 - Democratic Hold
Connecticut 2nd - David Bingham (Ref) - 39.15, Sam Gejdenson (D) - 32.07, Edward W. Munster (R) - 28.79 - Reform Pickup
Connecticut 5th - Rep Toby Moffett (D) - 45, Mark Neilsen (R) - 28.4, Rosita Rodriguez (Ref) - 26.6 - Democratic Hold
Georgia 4th - Cynthia McKinney wins - Democratic Hold
Georgia 6th - General Election - Sallie Newbill (R) - 49.4, David Worley (D) -42.8. defeats Runoff: Newbill - 53, Worley - 47 - Republican Pickup
Georgia 11th - General Election: Cathy Steinberg (D) 49.1, John Linder (R) - 43.1
Runoff: Steinberg 53, Linder 47 - Democratic Hold
Idaho 1st -Ref +1.8 Marion Ellis (Ref) -35.2 -Helen Chenoweth (R) - 33.4, Larry LaRocco (D) -31.4 - Reform Gain
Illinois - Districts shuffled compared to IOTL so the delegation is largely the same if possibly in a different seat. The seats with specifically different partisan control are:
Illinois 5th - Rep Dan Rostenkowski (D) - 71, Others - 29 - Democratic Hold
Illinois 18th - Glenn Poshard (D)-66, Brent Winters (R)- 29- Democratic Hold
Iowa 2nd - Eric Tabor (D) -46.8, Bob Brunkhorst (R) - 34.1 - Democratic Hold
Iowa 3rd - Elaine Baxter (D) - 44.4, Bob Kistler (R) - 35.9 - Democratic Hold
Kansas 4th - Seth Warren (Ref) - 35.1, Todd Tiahrt (R) - 33.1, Dan Glickman (D) - 31.8 - Reform Gain
Louisiana 7th - General Election: Rep Jimmy Hayes (D) - 46.6, Clyde Holloway (R) - 41.4, Ron Caser (Ref) - 12
Runoff Election: Clyde Holloway (R) - 50.4,Jimmy Hayes (D) - 49.6 - Republican Gain
Maine 1st - Thomas Andrews (D) -45.54, Ronald Dorler (Ref) - 37.69, James Longley (R)- 16.8 - Democratic Hold
Maine 2nd - John Michael (Ref) - 56.3, John Baldacci (D) -29.5, Richard Bennett (R) - 9.5 - Reform Gain
Maryland 5th - Larry Hogan (R)- 52.6, Steven Braun (D) - 37.9 - Republican Hold
Massachusetts 1st - Patrick Larkin (R) -50, Louis Godena (Ref) - 30.5, John Oliver (D) - 19.5 - Republican Hold
Michigan 7th - John Conyers (D) - 46.7, Nick Smith (R) - 31, Nick Proctor (Ref) - 21.6 - Democratic Hold
Michigan 8th -Howard Wolpe (D) - 43.4, Dick Chrylser (R) - 33.44Gerald Turcotte (Ref) - 21.7 - Democratic Hold
Michigan 11th - Bob Mitchell (D) - 56.6, Joe Knoellenberg (R) - 30.6 - Democratic Hold
Minnesota 2nd - Cal Ludeman (R) - 39.5, Stan Bentz (Ref) - 32, David Minge (D) - 28.5. - Republican HOld
Missouri 9th - Rick Hardy(R) - 45, Mitchell Moore (Ref) - 29, Stephen Waters (D) - 26 - Republican Hold
Montana - Steve Kelly (Ref) - 42.4, Pat Williams (D) - 37.4, Cy Jamison (R) - 20.2 - Reform Gain
Nevada 1st- Gary Wood (Ref) - 37.5, James Bilbray (D) - 36.1, John Ensign (R) - 26.4 - Reform Gain
New Hampshire 2nd - Richard Swett (D) - 35.7, Charles Bass (R) - 35.5, John Lewicke (Ref) -28.1 - Democratic Hold
New York 2nd - Rick Lazio (R) - 44.7, Thomas Downey (D) - 29.6 - Republican Gain
New York 4th - Philip Schilirio (D) - 37.5, Dan Frisa (R) - 32.7, Robert Berkowitz - 13.3, David Levy © - 2.7 - Vincent P. Garbitelli (Right to Life) - 2.7 - Democratic Hold
North Carolina's 4th -David Price (D) - 47, Fred Heineman (R) - 44.5 - Democratic Hold
Ohio 13th Margaret Mathna(D) -37.9, Gregory White (R) - 33.7, Howard Mason (Ref) - 27.2 [I didn't note this in the 1992 post, but this seat is held by Sherrod Brown in our timeline but he is still Secretary of State until losing re-election 1994 in this timeline.]
Oregon 5th -Catherine Weber (D) - 36, Jon Zimmer (Ref) - 32.8, Jim Bunn (R) - 31.1- Democratic Hold
Pennsylvania 15th - Jim Yeager (R) - 39.7, Paul McHale (D) - 38, Victor J. Mazziotti (Ref) - 22.3 - Republican Gain
Pennsylvania 18th - Jon Delano (D)- 50, John McCarty(R) - 32.5, Democratic Hold
Pennsylvania 20th - Bill Townsend(R) -44.2, Frank Mascara (D) - 38.3 - Republican Hold
Texas 9th - Jack Brooks (D) - 37.5, Steve Stockman (R) - 35, Bill Felton (Ref) - 26.5.[Jack Brooks gets to be Dean of the House in this timeline.]
Texas 13th - Bill Sarpalius(D) - 36.4, Mac Thornberry (R) - 36.3 - Democratic Hold
Utah 2nd - Merrill Cook (Ref) - 54.1, Enid Greene Waldholtz (R) - 27.4, Karen Sheperd (D) - 18.5 - Reform Gain
Wisconsin 1st - Lee Aspin (D) - 43.7, Mark Neumann (R)- 30.4, Edward Kozak (REF) - 25.9 - Democratic Hold
Wyoming - Bob Schuster (DRef) - 63.5, Barbara Cubin (R) - 19.2

[5] I [@jpj1421] was waffling between her and John Lewis, but I did a head count of the caucus and came out to 118 Pelosi, 93 Lewis, 8 Abstain with Pelosi running to Lewis' right and winning the votes of most of the Democrats who narrowly survived in 1994 plus the 7 California Democrats elected in this timeline giving her 34 votes out of California. She also takes about 2/3 of Texas and New York and that's that.

[6] Closest Senate Races:
Tennessee (Regular) - D+.21 - Senator Jim Sasser (D) defeats Bill Frist (R) - 48.72-48.51- Democratic Hold
Minnesota - Ref + .84% - Jesse Ventura (Ref) defeats Rod Grams (R) and Ann Wynia (D) - 34.41 - 33.57- 30.62 - Reform Gain
New Jersey - D + 2.23 % - Senator Frank Lautenberg (D) defeats Chuck Haytaian (R) and Michael Kelly (Ref) - 43.66-41.43-13.01- Democratic Hold
Montana - D+ 2.95% - Senator John Melcher (D) defeats Becky Shaw (Ref) and Lt. Governor Denny Rehberg (R) - 36.28-33.33-30.39 - Democratic Hold
Washington - D+3.67% - Mayor Norm Rice (D) [Senator Mike Lowery abruptly dropped out after scandal] def Ralph Munro (R) and William Goodlowe (Ref) - 37.61-33.94-28.45 - Democratic Hold
Virginia - D+4.39% - Doug Wilder (D) defeats Oliver North (R) and J Marshall Coleman (Ref) - 40.29-39.86-19.79 - Democratic Hold
Delaware - R+4.51% - Senator William Roth (R) defeats Charles Oberly (D) and John Dierick (Ref) - 40.41-35.9-23.69 - Republican Hold
Arizona- R + 4.85% - Congressman John Kyl (R) defeats Scott Grainger (Ref) and Congressman Sam Coopersmith (D) 40.32-35.47-2421 - Republican Gain

Races Different from Our Timeline:
California: Senator Peter Wilson (R) defeats Controller Gray Davis (D) and Activist Elizabeth Barron (Ref) 44-25-22 - Republican Hold
Florida: JEB Bush (R) defeats Senator Buddy MacKay (D) and Jack Gargan (Ref) - 48-31-21. Republican Gain. Same Party, different Senator.
Georgia Special Election: Election Day (>45% needed to avoid runoff) - Senator Max Cleland (D) - 36, Guy Millner (R)- 17, Johnny Isakson (R)- 15, Jack Cashin (Ref) -11, Clint Day (R) - 8
Runoff Results - Guy Millner (R) defeats Max Cleland (D) - 54-46 - Republican Gain
Maine: Angus King (Ref) defeats Olympia Snowe (R) and Patrick McGowan (D) - 45-32-23 - Reform Gain
Michigan - Ronna Romney (R) defeats Bob Carr (D) and John Coon (Ref) 44 - 31 - 24 -Republican Gain
Minnesota - Jesse Ventura (Ref) defeats Rod Grams (R) and Ann Wynia (D) - 34.41 - 33.57- 30.62 - Reform Gain
Montana - Senator John Melcher (D) defeats Becky Shaw (Ref) and Lt. Governor Denny Rehberg (R) - 36.28-33.33-30.39- Democratic Hold
Rhode Island - State Representative Linda Kushner (D) def Frederick Dick (Ref) and Robert Post (R) [John Chaffee defeated in the primary] - 40.7-33.41-25.89 - Democratic Gain
Tennessee (Regular) - Senator Jim Sasser (D) defeats Bill Frist (R) - 48.72-48.51 - Democratic Hold
Tennessee (Special) - Representative Jim Cooper (D) defeats Bob Corker (R) - 53.57-44 - Democratic Hold
Texas - Senator Joe Barton (R) def. Ross Perot Jr (Ref) and Richard Fischer (D) - 50.27 -25.11-24.52
Vermont - Senator Jim Jeffords (Ref) [After losing the Republican primary] def Jan Backus (D) and John McMullen (R) 42.66-25.41-22.82 - Reform Gain
Virginia – After Chuck Robb is hit by the Tai Collins scandal and other controversies, Doug Wilder (D) beats him in the primary and goes on to defeat Oliver North (R) and J Marshall Coleman (Ref) - 40.29-39.86-19.79 – Democratic Hold Gain
Washington - Mayor Norm Rice (D) [Senator Mike Lowery abruptly dropped out after scandal] def Ralph Munro (R) and William Goodlowe (Ref) - 37.61-33.94-28.45 - Democratic Hold
Wyoming - Senator John Vinich (DRef) [The Wyoming Democratic and Reform Parties merged into Democratic-Reform] def. Craig Thomas (R) - 66.51-31.69 - Democratic Reform Gain.

[7] In our timeline Sasser was the expected successor to George Mitchell right up until he lost, Tom Daschle ended up edging out Chris Dodd by one vote. I [@jpj1421] read somewhere that the tie breaker was Nighthorse Campbell in absentee ballot before he switched parties. I did a bit of a head count and I think Sasser would get the gig, with Daschle turning towards Whip when Wendell Ford retires. I did a head count here and some research on the Minority Whip race, and I think Trent Lott beats Alan Simpson by one vote again for the job. I feel like King would be the Reform consensus choice with Vinich's nominal support and Campbell having been a Democrat recently.

[8] Closest Races:
Georgia - R+.48 - General Election - Paul Heard (R)- Zell Miller (D), Jack Cashin (Ref) - 46.34-45.89-7.77
Runoff - Paul Heard (R) def. Governor Zell Miller 50.24- 49.76 - Republican Gain
New York - Con/R +1.01 - Al D’Amato (Con/R) def Mario Cuomo (D/Lib) and Tom Golisano (Ref) - 41.89 [Con - 22.57, R - 19.32] - 39.81 [D- 38.04, Lib - 1.77] - 16.77 - Conservative/Republican Gain. Democrats retain first position and Conservatives retain second position.
Maine - Ref + 3.07 - Jonathan Carter (Ref) def Governor Joseph Brenan (D) and Susan Collins (R) -43.37-40.3-13.63 - Reform Gain
South Carolina - R+3.95 - David Beasley (R) def Nick Theodore (D) - 49.03-45.08 - Republican Hold
Arkansas - D+4.25 - Attorney General Winston Bryant (D) def Sheffield Nelson (R)- 51.15-46.9 Democratic Hold
California - D+4.61 - Governor Dianne Feinstein (D) def Ron Unz (R) and Richard Rider (Ref) - 39.05-34.39-24.05 - Democratic Hold
Tennessee - D+4.91- Phil Bredesen (D) def Don Sundquist (R) - 51.32-46.41 - Democratic Hold

Changes from Our Timeline:
Alabama - Governor Paul Hubbert (D) def Fob James (R) 52.63-44.28 - Democratic Hold
Alaska - Jack Coghill (Ref) def Tony Knowles (D) and Jim Campbell (R) - 50.95-27.14-16.81 - Reform Hold
Arizona - Governor Terry Goddard (D) def John Buttrick (Ref) and Barbara Barrett (R) - 39.01-31.77-29.12 - Democratic Hold
Arkansas - Attorney General Winston Bryant (D) def Sheffield Nelson (R)- 51.15-46.9 -Democratic Hold
California - Governor Dianne Feinstein (D) def Ron Unz (R) and Richard Rider (Ref) - 39.05-34.39-24.05 - Democratic Hold
Connecticut - Eunice Groark (Ref) def John Roland (R) and Bill Curry (D) - 43.15-22.44-22.21 - Reform Hold
Georgia - General Election - Paul Heard (R), Zell Miller (D), Jack Cashin (Ref) - 46.34-45.89-7.77
Runoff - Paul Heard (R) def. Governor Zell Miller 50.24- 49.76 - Republican Gain
Hawaii -Frank Fasi (Ref) def Ben Cayetano (D) and Pat Saika (R) -40.23-34.59-21.68 - Reform Gain
Idaho - Ronald Rankin (Ref) def Larry Echo Hawk (D) and Phil Batt (R) - 38.99-30.72-30.29 - Reform Gain
Illinois - Secretary of State George Ryan (R) def Governor Neil Hartigan (D) and David Kelley (Ref) - 49.73-34.2-16.06 - Republican Gain
Maine - Jonathan Carter (Ref) def Governor Joseph Brenan (D) and Susan Collins (R) -43.37-40.3-13.63 - Reform Gain
Michigan - Spencer Abraham (R) def. Olivia Maynard (D) and William Roundtree (Ref) - 49-31-20 - Republican Gain
New York - Al D’Amato (Con/R) def Mario Cuomo (D/Lib) and Tom Golisano (Ref) - 41.89 [Con - 22.57, R - 19.32] - 39.81 [D- 38.04, Lib - 1.77] - 16.77 - Conservative/Republican Gain. Democrats retain first position and Conservatives retain second position.
Oklahoma - Wes Watkins (Ref) def Frank Keating (R) and Jack Mildren (D) - 50.61-31.88-17.51 - Reform Gain
Rhode Island - Robert Healey (Ref) def Lincoln Almond (R) and Myrth York (D) - 42.51-34.27-23.22 - Reform Gain
Tennessee - Phil Bredesen (D) def Don Sundquist (R) - 51.32-46.41 - Democratic Hold
Texas - Ann Richards (D) def Jack Fields (R)and Keary Ehlers (Ref) - 39.89-34.4-25.75 - Democratic Hold
Vermont - Peter Welch (D) def Thomas Moore (Ref) - 53.5-42.66 - Democratic Hold
Wyoming - Kathy Karpan (DRef) def Jim Gerringer (R) - 62.41-36.49 - Democratic Hold

[9] Based in part on an actual article from our timeline, modified for this timeline.

[10] Per our timeline.

[11] Also per our timeline.

[12] Compared to our timeline’s 45.3-44.7-3.9

[13] Compared to our timeline’s 49.3-47.4 loss.

[14] This happened in our timeline too.

[15] He joined the GOP in our timeline, but the Reform platform is probably more in keeping with his Frontier Populism.

[16] Evolved into the Constitution Party in our timeline. Note also that the wonderfully-named Best Party of Hawaii is butterflied, since Reform will effectively absorb the folks who would have formed it (e.g. Frank Fasi).

[17] Reform will see the skunk as a noble animal: resourceful, self-sufficient, and solitary. It’s neither aggressive nor fearful, and despite its small size, no other beast, however strong and fierce, ever messes with it twice.
 
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Furthermore, the razor thin Democratic majorities have placed the Reform Party into an enviable position as potential kingmakers for a variety of legislative priorities for both larger parties.
Oh that's going to make things complicated.
Having not only bi partisanship but also the Reformists to please, both parties are going to get on their good sides.
Reform Candidates took the governor’s chair in Alaska, Connecticut, Hawaii, Idaho, Maine, Oklahoma, and Rhode Island
Not bad for a first election.
gubernatorial
What does that word even mean?
Never heard of it.
Reform would make many local alliances with other third parties, notably the Libertarians (particularly in the South and West) and the Greens (particularly in the Northeast). They absorbed the Alaska Independence Party in whole. They made inroads in New York with the Liberal party and effectively absorbed the Connecticut Party in that state. It also stole many members and potential politicians from the U.S. Taxpayers’ Party[16
Man, I through that they would fall straight into alt right territory, but this focus on regional autonomy has thrown a wrench into that.
Wonder how long they can keep that up before they will eventually have to set a more uniform course.
And Perot looked on in amusement, his friends and colleagues noting him to be “quite smug” about the whole thing. Cartoonist Pat Oliphant captured the moment in a landmark political cartoon that showed a smugly grinning Perot as a skunk, trailing a cloud of populist demands past a gagging anthropomorphic elephant and donkey, saying “Pardon me for makin’ a stink…” The cartoon would be celebrated by the Reform party, who soon replaced their interim Bald Eagle mascot with that of a skunk[17].
The Proud American Tradition of taking the Piss by adopting symbols of mockery as official party insignia.

Also political cartoonists are going to have fun with that.
but George W. Bush won out statewide in our timeline by riding the Republican Revolution, which is muted in this timeline. Where’s W? Find out soon
My money is on him not entering politics, besides that no idea.
Maybe he also moves to Atlanta and joins Ted Turner's Second Chances Jamboree, who knows.

Great chapter @Geekhis Khan and especially @jpj1421 thanks for keeping all this electoral stuff in mind.
 
Wonder if shares in Sumitomo Bank are effected by these murders?

"A parcel bomb exploded that at the Nippon Television Network building" - well I hope the perp is caught.

"Indian Navy would have the Ukrainian shipyard in Mykolaiv make two aircraft carriers" - wonder how long before Pakistan tries to build one? Good news for the USR though.

Yuri laughed at this point, “I can’t help but be a salesman.” - after-all dealing in death is 'just business'.

"But Takimoto also said, “I am now not only representing the Aum Supreme Truth Victims Association" - good luck sir. Seems your biggest problem here is the Police.

Good luck Hiroyuki Nagaoka.
----------------

"Think, if you will, Look and Read meets Bill Nye meets Voltron meets Bruce Lee in spandex for a general idea of it." - heck of a description for a TV show!

"One way or another, save for a couple of stories, the kids never won out in the end. They almost always met a brutal, perhaps unfair, but usually fitting end." - cannot see that going down well with American parent groups...

"...believed that Jim Henson or Disney would never take Grizzly Tales as it was." - probably right. Seems outside std Disney, maybe the Skele Crew though?

"...writing team consisting of myself (part of the deal)," - good idea, help keep the original ideas alive and not squished out.

"Every episode would end with the traumatized kid screaming into the night," - it was Grizzelda all along?

"Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids" "CBBC in the UK," - wonder if they 'de-Americanized' it for the UK market?

Why can I see Danny de Vito playing the The Spaghetti Man perfectly?

"...the introduction of Tim Burton and Danny Elfman's Gothic, B-Movie homaging, Goosebumps cartoon in 1995." - sounds like a fun rivalry.
--------

"Ross Perot’s insurgent Reform Party gained 8 House seats and 3 Senate seats," - well that's going to put the cat among the pigeons. Start of a Three Party USA?

"This gives the Democrats a thin 54-43-3 Senate margin" - ouch. Guess we will see how Gore governs with this, but he might be in trouble.

"A Democratic polling firm found that many swing voters were more worried about a “religious right-wing agenda” - yeah I would be too. Some of them come across as a bit... unbalanced.

Reform is doing well at the Congress level, but how it is doing in local elections for Councils and such? That is a where a proper national party will be made.

"And Reform candidates would have a growing impact at the State and Local level, pushing through changes using grassroots energy and targeted compromise with the majority parties," - Ah I see. Wonder how many Town and City Councils will fall into full Reform control?

"Even Sesame Street got into the action, introducing the character of Ross Parrot." - Did ITTL Perot like Parrot as much as OTL @Geekhis Khan ?

"...replaced their interim Bald Eagle mascot with that of a skunk" - for solid logical reasoning too. Don't mess with skunks!

Interesting last few chapters @Geekhis Khan - thanks also to all the contributors.
 
"One way or another, save for a couple of stories, the kids never won out in the end. They almost always met a brutal, perhaps unfair, but usually fitting end." - cannot see that going down well with American parent groups...
Give it time. By season 3, shit'll go sideways after an entire season of child deaths. The first two outings are downright restrained by comparison.
"...writing team consisting of myself (part of the deal)," - good idea, help keep the original ideas alive and not squished out.
Plus it was the only way to stop executive meddling turning the show into an Eerie, Indiana clone.
"Every episode would end with the traumatized kid screaming into the night," - it was Grizzelda all along?
I don't know what that means.
"Grizzly Tales for Gruesome Kids" "CBBC in the UK," - wonder if they 'de-Americanized' it for the UK market?
Probably not. I remember them showing Tiny Toons and Animaniacs on CBBC and Nick/CN shows on CITV. The UK Market thrives of American toons.
Why can I see Danny de Vito playing the The Spaghetti Man perfectly?
Thing is, The Spaghetti Man is supposed to be Italian, like, gratuitously so. If De Vito can pull that off, more power to him.
"...the introduction of Tim Burton and Danny Elfman's Gothic, B-Movie homaging, Goosebumps cartoon in 1995." - sounds like a fun rivalry.
Yeah, I was shifting between having it be a Live action show or a 90s CG cartoon and I went for the latter.
 
Right, let's take a little looksee shall we? Republicans not having an absolute stormer is to be expected but the fact that the Democrats still have something of a hold on both houses is remarkable really! This is going to be a bit rambling so I apologize.

Let's do the governors here. Dubya sitting out the Texas governorship is interesting, as is Ann Richards winning re-election! She might have a chance in 2000, should she wish too of course. The Democrats holding on in the South is a really interesting development, and Coghill winning Alaska feels a bit overdue! Georgia's governor is interesting, as is Zell Miller losing out. The Reform wins are interesting but the one in Maine caught my eye. Definitely interesting to see an ecologist win out there. Spencer Abraham winning as governor seems a perfect fit for him, as opposed to Congress. It always seems like Cuomo is doomed to lose in 1994, it's a pity but there it is.

Onto the house! Naturally the Democrats are bleeding support in the South but a lot slower than I expected. Shelby not sticking around is a given but Wallace Jr is a surprise (Though having read up on him, maybe it shouldn't be). Nighthorse Campbell jumping to Reform'll give them a hell of a boost. Alaska being a bit competitive in the House is certainly new, and Reform picking it up seems to make sense. The Democrats holding California is an interesting one, pretty much across the board in the house. I'm glad to see Moffett sticking, man was a real trooper for the liberals. McKinney gets in ten years earlier, very impressive! Gringich's district swinging back to the Republicans makes a lot of sense but Linder losing again is a real shocker! Idaho seems like the perfect place for the Reform party to do some real work in, same goes for Kansas, Montana, Utah and Wyoming. Rostenkowski winning in a landslide makes me assume that either his mail fraud wasn't discovered or something else happened, who really knows either way? Clyde Hollaway makes sense as a Republican freshman, especially in the changing world of Louisiana. Andrews deciding not to head for the senate seems a smart choice, but I'm surprised that Baldacci lost as he did. Also just a note, you have two Minnesota 6th District races in your Closest Margins list. Nevada being gained by Reform might knock Ensign's political future out of the picture which is...certainly interesting. Lazio gets in two years later than he is in OTL, that's fun to see. Heinz dragging the Republicans over the line in Pennsylvania is very interesting to see, I've always wondered if how really popular he could have been if he had lived a few more terms. I had to admit to having a little cheer for Jack Brooks getting to be the Dean of the House, stupid bloody title really but it's nice to see nonetheless, as is Mac Thornberry losing by a literal hair in the votes. And a victory for Les Aspin to close us out! Phew. Now onto the less complicated stuff.

A Bush in the senate! That's interesting, I wonder if old Jeb will be more or less popular. I'd be lying if I said that Sasser retaining didn't raise a cheer from me here. I rather like the senator, though with a few caveats, and aiding Cooper in keeping Tennessee somewhat blue is always a good sign. Reform costing Democrats the California seat is very annoying, as is Cleland losing in the run-off. King getting the Reform nomination and entering the senate early has been done a few times but it's always interesting to see it happen, as is Ventura managing to avoid getting dragged down in the WWE crash. A Romney returning to Michigan is interesting, I wonder if Mitt made the ill-fated bid for Massachusetts senator in this timeline. Melcher seems like the kind of Democrat who might survive a wave like this. Chafee losing in the primary is shockingly, sincerely. Perhaps he'll get to enjoy that long awaited peace he was looking for in OTL. Fair play to Kushner too. Holy shit, Oliver North was that close to entering the senate! Thank god for Wilder and for Robb failing to win. The Lowry scandal was to be expected but it's great to see Norm Rice enter the Senate, he strikes me as a good fit.

Fair play to Ms Burstein, that's a great rejection of the gutter politics. Pity about California though, but the work goes on!

All of this is really interesting, definitely feels like the parties are beginning to twist themselves apart here. 1996 is going to be very interesting indeed!
 
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