What if Napoleon had lived to age 85-90

About the "Marshal Napoleon is insulting" argument, why not create a special rank for him, like George Washington was posthumously awarded: General of the Armies?

So Marshal of France is a no go, but what about "Marshal of the Armies", a special Napoleon-only honorific rank?
Well actually after looking it up a bit more, Marshal General of France was the title given to Soult. Napoleon should get something higher presumably.
 
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About the "Marshal Napoleon is insulting" argument, why not create a special rank for him, like George Washington was posthumously awarded: General of the Armies?

So Marshal of France is a no go, but what about "Marshal of the Armies", a special Napoleon-only honorific rank?
Well actually after looking it up a bit more, Marshal General of France was the title given to Soult. Napoleon should get something higher presumably.
Title you mentioned, originally, maréchal général des camps et armées du roi existed since the end of the XVI (definitely prior to 1602) and was one notch lower than Connetable of France. So, following your proposal, position of Connetable has to be restored and given to Nappy.

But the point remains: for a former Emperor anything (except for the title of emperor) is a big demotion, especially when it comes to a military area and Nappy (even position of a Connetable was a subordinate one). So how about some purely honorific title like “father of the nation” (Pater Patriae)? It acknowledges person’s importance for the country while not necessarily implying any specific duties or powers. The notion already existed in Europe (Skanderbeg, Phillip the Good) and elsewhere (San Martin, Bolivar, O’Higgins, etc.) and in some cases it went together with the imperial dignity as was the case with Peter I, Dom Pedro I, Catherine II (who obviously was a “mother”). So there is no demotion or humiliation and he could be given some appointment to keep him busy. Something like overseeing the French army (inspector-general) or being President of the Senate, etc. Special court protocol has to be developed to address the issues of salutation, precedence t the ceremonies, etc.
 
Two of Napoleon's brothers (Joseph and Jerome) died 76 years old, and the third brother (Louis) died at 65.
Apparently there is no genetic illness in the family, so Napoleon too might reach late seventies. However, the combined effects of stress and hard life during campaigns make it unlikely. I would guess that he wouldn't live beyond mid sixties.
 
Two of Napoleon's brothers (Joseph and Jerome) died 76 years old, and the third brother (Louis) died at 65.
Apparently there is no genetic illness in the family, so Napoleon too might reach late seventies. However, the combined effects of stress and hard life during campaigns make it unlikely. I would guess that he wouldn't live beyond mid sixties.

Senseless nitpicking: Louis died at age 67; it was Lucien who died at age 65. Jérôme didn't quite reach 76. And while Napoleon's father died young (38), his mother lived to see her 85th birthday.
But yes, I agree with the general sense of the statement. Yet, what if he did "miraculously" die at a ripe old age? Even by doing nothing but sitting and waiting death on Saint Helena, this would still change history, as it would probably change the political carreer of his nephue. But I must admit not knowing enough about this time period to say how.
 
Senseless nitpicking: Louis died at age 67; it was Lucien who died at age 65. Jérôme didn't quite reach 76. And while Napoleon's father died young (38), his mother lived to see her 85th birthday.
But yes, I agree with the general sense of the statement. Yet, what if he did "miraculously" die at a ripe old age? Even by doing nothing but sitting and waiting death on Saint Helena, this would still change history, as it would probably change the political carreer of his nephue. But I must admit not knowing enough about this time period to say how.
I think that the changes will start to appear much earlier than the 1850s: a Napoleon still alive during the 1820s and the 1830s will be always seen as a potential danger to the European order established at Vienna. This is going to work against his siblings, and even more so the children of his siblings. It can go in very different ways, depending how individuals are going to behave in this ATL. Is Louis Napoleon still going through a period of revolutionary leanings? In such a case, he might not survive his escapades, be them in Italy or in France. By the same token, he might refrain from this behavior and fade away into obscurity. Anyway you look at that, the likelihood for him to become president of the French republic and later on emperor is likely to be butterflied away.
I suppose that even the life of Napoleon's son will be quite different, he is likely to be kept under much stricter wraps. On the flip side, he will be kept away from the army, which may mean no pneumonia in 1831 and no death in 1832.
A surviving Napoleon will also change in some way the behavior of the Bourbons in France: it makes a difference to have the former emperor still alive in the 1820s.
These changes may well butterfly away the insurrection of 1830 (maybe it is repressed, maybe it comes earlier), and do away with the Orleans monarchy. In such a case, also the Belgian insurrection will fail, if it happens (and probably it will not happen without a sympathetic regime in France).

This does not mean that the Bourbons will necessarily remain on the throne, though. The issues which were at the basis of the insurrection will not go away because the insurrection has been crushed.

I would not really worry whether Napoleon will be allowed to retire to France in his old age, but rather about what is going to change in Europe during the 1820s and 1830s.
 
I would agree that he almost certainly does not get off the island unless the French government agrees to accept him. That will never happen under the Bourbons. Louis-Philippe? Uncertain. Maybe he would offer to take him in (under house arrest in France).
good way for the
Louis Napoléon would certainly agree to it though, and by that point, the British would probably accept.
Returning the body of a dead Napoleon to France and interring him in a porphyry sarcophagus in the crypt of the Dôme des Invalides was a usefull tool for the Orléans dynasty to bind moderate Bonapartists to the July monarchy, something a living Napoleon, around whom Bonapartists could coalesce, would never have been, so I doubt they'd be eager to see him return to France. I could easily see them making demands that the British release him, but phrasing them in a way to ascertain that the British would have no option but to refuse.
 
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