Part II Next year or in 10/20 years Real time

  • Yes: Next year

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • No: 10/20 years in the future

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Other Choice: Leave a comment.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12
  • Poll closed .
I know it doesn't fit the TL scope, but personally I'd like to see a Fallout, Elder Scrolls or maybe Watch Dog 1 film. Also, you mentioned the 2030's, I think. If so, would we see something like Disney Infinite a space company replacing Virgin Galactic or SpaceX? As always, another great post.
I am going to be in my 30s when the sequel to this comes out. That's scary.
A fallout series could work, each episode focusing on a different person or aspect of the wasteland.
Elder Scrolls would likely be the same, can't focus on the movies because its an RPG game and well they are popular because of the choices you can make
Watchdogs can be butterflied cos that series is not great and well Ubisoft is not doing so great as of now but the premise could work as a film.
Disneyland on the moon maybe? who knows. Richard Branson works for Disney here.
 
I am going to be in my 30s when the sequel to this comes out. That's scary.
A fallout series could work, each episode focusing on a different person or aspect of the wasteland.
Elder Scrolls would likely be the same, can't focus on the movies because its an RPG game and well they are popular because of the choices you can make
Watchdogs can be butterflied cos that series is not great and well Ubisoft is not doing so great as of now but the premise could work as a film.
Disneyland on the moon maybe? who knows. Richard Branson works for Disney here.
Happy birthday for then! Fallout&Elder Scrolls I agree.
Watchdogs and Ubisoft I gotta admit aren't doing that good.
Disney land Moon is like something from Futurama! :)
 
Happy birthday for then! Fallout&Elder Scrolls I agree.
Watchdogs and Ubisoft I gotta admit aren't doing that good.
Disney land Moon is like something from Futurama! :)
Ubisoft sucks masssivly. For reasons, I won't bring up here because of the nature of the problem.
Futurama is amazing.
And Remember This:
We are on the final countdown for the End now.
If you got any more questions. Do ask.
(Side note: were about to go inside Geroge Disney's head!)​
 
Ubisoft sucks masssivly. For reasons, I won't bring up here because of the nature of the problem.
Futurama is amazing.
And Remember This:
We are on the final countdown for the End now.
If you got any more questions. Do ask.
(Side note: were about to go inside Geroge Disney's head!)​
So far Disney have expanded into nearly everything. If they do expand into space, will, in the sequel, they collapse? If yes, how badly would economies be affected?
If they do expand into space companies but don't collapse, is there anything else Disney can do?
Also, has any president or board accused the company of trying to monopolise?
 
So far Disney have expanded into nearly everything. If they do expand into space, will, in the sequel, they collapse? If yes, how badly would economies be affected?
If they do expand into space companies but don't collapse, is there anything else Disney can do?
Also, has any president or board accused the company of trying to monopolise?
That reminds me of this:
1627327464089.png

I havent thaught about the sequel in the slightly tbh. its allmost ten years away.
 
Side Chapter Six: The Final Stop for Dreamworks

Side Chapter Six: The Final Stop for Dreamworks​

Well, Disney had always been the main show, it had not been alone in putting on the act. Dreamworks studios (Once known as Fleischer Studios) was always right beside Disney putting on its act. Now as the final bow came, Disney took a step to the side to allow Dreamworks to tell the final piece of its history. Many saw them as rivals or always had. the two animation companies that were nothing but bitter foes fighting it out for animation domination. Yet it was far from the case, by the 1990s any rivalry that did exist between the studios had evaporated or had turned into a friendly form of competition. Each studio wanted to be better than the other but it was no longer hostile. The strongest case for this was a book written by George Arthur Disney which he worked on in 2014 with former Dreamworks staff. That book titled (Hollywood: The Story of two stories) detailed the history of the two companies but some of the biggest and most important sections of the book came in the 1990s portion of the book near the end. Below are some experts from that book, a book that solidified the friendly rivalry between DreamWorks and Disney. Two animation studios had survived the test of time.

Theme Parks

We Here at Disney have had theme parks since the 1950s. It was Father who had brought them into existence with Disneyland. We should have expected that other studios would follow suit and let you into a known fact. Father loved competition from other studios. He believed it drove his Imagineers to work harder to keep an edge over the other studios. As he expected it, Universal Studios Hollywood became the first Universal Studios theme park when it opened its doors on July 15, 1964, long after it was originated as a studio tour in 1915. I remember visiting the park four times with my father, he was mesmerised by it. When Dreamworks bought Universal, I know the company was a bit took back. We had a history with that company, they helped us get where we are today. One of the things I remember the news talking about was how would they cope with the theme parks. Universal Hollywood was extremely popular, Theodore at the time held meetings with staff and talked about it amongst the family as he too was interested in what the studio would do. We soon found out as just a couple of weeks after they had bought universal, they renamed the park Dreamworks Park Hollywood.

We thought that was over and set about focusing on our own business, at the time DreamWorks seemed content with just one park and that suited us fine. Little did we know at the time, DreamWorks had seen how lucrative the theme park business could be. It would take time for any further development to come and I know at the time my family were busy focusing on other things. I was walking my dog with my partner in Orlando when I learnt the news. Dreamworks Orlando was coming. It was a shock to everyone but Disney embraced it. father installed a sense of competitiveness in all of us you see and that transferred into us and also the staff. We were more than pumped for Orlando to expand. I love the city; my husband and I have called it home since the 1990s. The Park officially opened on June 7, 1990. I was there along with Kathleen and Paul; the mood was electric. The party that day was probably the biggest party of my life.

After that, we expected the unexpected and DreamWorks did not disappoint. Wet 'n Wild Orlando came under their ownership in 1995 which added to their Orlando parks. Orlando came to life once again with universal inside the city. Things began to pop all over it was insane. I-drive itself became the central tourist location, one we tend to stay away from these days due to age and our recognisability but we sometimes visit the restaurants there. The Orlando resort would expand again in 1999 with island of adventures. They truly did seem to mine all the things they owned there was a rollercoaster based on Frankenstein and a James bond simulator ride (the first of its kind) we wanted coemption and we got it on buckets full.

That wasn’t the end of their expansions either. The company soon expanded into Europe just as had but they opted not to build a new park which made sense we had done it in Japan though we mostly rebuilt that place. They bought Port Aventura and renamed it Dreamworks Mediterránea. I have not been personal but my son tells me it is a great place to visit. At the time we believed it was only a matter of time before they came for the Asian market as had. Japan is like a sister to America nowadays, DreamWorks had helped foster that relation alongside the warner brothers. Japan is a go-to holiday destination for many and I can see why. A beautiful democratic nation, and a great ally. Our theories were confirmed correct. Universal Studios in Japan opened in 2001, it was the last overseas park I would visit. It’s a beautiful place. My husband and I got married in Japan when they legalised gay marriage alongside the USA in 2002. Such a happy place.

Expansion to the companies structure
One thing I know Disney is now known as is the great eater or to some the great savour. Some suspect companies like pan-am, toys r-us or blockbuster may have gone bust without us but here they are today stronger than ever alongside our other purchases. We expanded so much but we always attempted to make sure the purchases where one’s done correctly. No other studio seemed to be that aggressive with the purchases as we were. It was one of the things fathers instilled in us, however. The expansion could mean success if done right. Father and uncle’s policies have guided the studio for so long. Dreamworks had bought universal which was one crazy purchase that I talked about in an earlier chapter but we did not expect it. We had no idea at the time what that purchase meant for the future.

My husband would always go for a run, around the nearby parks. He would always bring the newspaper back. I liked to read it before I got to work, had to keep updated on the news. It often helped shape the productions we were working on. I remember swearing out loud when I read that DreamWorks was expanding to buy TWA. If you have been living under a rock, TWA stands for trans world airlines and is the world’s second-largest airline under pan am. We own pan-am, it has been the Disney airline for years and is very good to fly under. Dreamworks wanted to be competitive on that front as TWA fell under their control. I can’t deny I have flown TWA and the airline is still one of the best in the business. There are talks of the two companies working together on a successor to the Concorde but as of writing this I can’t confirm or deny it. The Purchases did not stop here. They wanted in on every market. They bought EA, Interplay Entertainment, and id Software. Not a very big fan of video games but my son tells me they make some of the best games in the industry. I will have to take his word for it.

Films

There are so many films this studio has made it nearly impossible to talk about them all. My father instilled a great love of theatre into me and the family. Every Saturday we will gather at one of our houses and have a film night, sometimes we go to the cinema as well. One thing I have always been taught to do is view other films. To go see a production that is not just our own. this was not a thing father taught us but something Ub told us. He believed a healthy exposure to other things could broaden our minds and that advice has stuck. Below I have listed some of their biggest or some of the movies I have loved from them during the 1980s and early 00s. some honourable mentions that did not make it into the list include Titanic, Scooby-Doo: the motion picture, Casper the Friendly Ghost, Twister, Richie Rich and Gladiator.

Child’s play one (1989) and two (1992): What is there to say about these two films that haven’t been said already. The slasher genre was killed in the 1980s by the overindulgence of cheap slashers going after silly naked girls which is something I don’t like. But child’s play seemed to shift that formula into something else, the murderous doll was a godsend to horror like scream would be years later. With a screenplay by Don Mancini and directing done by Tom Holland. The films were able to mix the scary with the comedic and today the franchise lives on because of the success of these first two entries.

The Mummy (1998) / the mummy returns (2001): The classic monster movies were always on in our home growing up, father made fairy tales but he loved those classic movies. The mummy was the first movie I ever watched and so when I learned they were remaking them I grimaced. Remakes and reboots are shunned upon in Hollywood now. they happen but many prefer sequels or original content. my worries however were to be for nothing. Stephen Sommers was in charge and he knew what he was doing. With, Brendan Fraser as the leader the films became grand adventures with romance and scares. They were hits and too many are considered the pinnacle of 90s action. They are the first more adult movies I have showed my children, they too loved them. They also knew when to stop with the second film.

Schindler's List (1993): If you wanted to cry. This is the movie for you. I can’t watch this movie alone which is a testament to the quality of the film’s production and stylistic choices. If you did not know, Schindler's List follows the story of the film follows Oskar Schindler who together with his wife Emilie Schindler saved more than a thousand mostly Polish-Jewish refugees from the Holocaust. The film was directed by Disney’s Steven Spielberg and it shows. This film is a must-watch for anyone but is warned it is in black and white and will tug at anyone’s heartstrings. I say there’s been no greater historical movie than this one.

We happy few (2002): From history, I shift my focus to alternative history now. The genre had been growing for some time but this was the film that decided to take it and run with it. in a movie, I can only describe what it feels like to take acid at some points though it’s not something I have personally done. the film was also DreamWorks first R-rated film, never have I seen so much gore in my life but that is to be expected. John Carpenter (who crafted our great Halloween series) was in the driving seat and he told a masterful story which some say is like Halloween meets a clockwork orange. Watch this film but be ready for a psychedelic trip with lots and lots of gore.

The Prince of Egypt (1998): We are known for grand animated films but so is Dreamworks. This picture proves it. I am not religious in any way but this film touched me. The film is an adaptation of the Book of Exodus and follows the life of Moses from being a prince of Egypt to his ultimate destiny to lead the children of Israel out of Egypt. My only words for this film are beautiful heart-wrenching but all together with a good movie. max Fleischer and Hanna-Barbera had installed such a good work ethic at their company and this movie truly makes it shine through. The film was also a musical which is not something this studio always did but I am happy they did. The score by Hans Zimmer was on point. I wish they would make more musical animated films in the future.

Shrek (2000): Moving away from movies that touched me, to movies that completely shocked me. I like many others went into Shrek with low expectations as it was their first fully CG film and it also looked set to mock many of the things, we held dear. We had no idea if it was going to look any good or be mean spirited. Thankfully our worries turned out to be completely wrong, Shrek was probably better than any animated film we happened to release that year. The film was widely praised for its animation, voice performances, writing and humour and I can see why. This one was in no way mean spirited and we got our own back in 2005.

The Road to El Dorado (2001): Some don’t like this 2001 movie; I suspect this happened because of its release after the extremely popular Shrek but I hold a soft spot for this film as I do for most animation productions. It was another musical but this time more comedic in nature. The plot and songs aren’t the best but the movie has heart and had good intentions. In more recent years, this film has gained a cult following which I support wholeheartedly. There are talks of a Disney version of this story but alas all I know this are rumours.

Spiderman (1999): And now we move onto the big three all know. Picture the year is 1999, there hasn’t been a comic book movie for years and then comes Spiderman to fill the void and begun the golden era of comic book movies. I read comic books a lot as a child. It was something my father could easily get at airports when we travelled so this film was something I adored massively. Sam Rami was in the directing chair and proved superhero movies could still be popular. Today we are spoiled with superhero films but this film began it all. Edward Furlong was the spiderman we all know and love today and here’s a fact. We helped them get permission to film inside the world trade centre. This is a classic and so are the sequels. We are spoiled with the Marvel Multiverse today but always come back to what kickstarted Marvel films.

Jurassic Park (1993): Who knew one film could change so much in Hollywood. We here at Disney do, my father did it many times but so too did this studio and here again, they would do it. Steven Spielberg did it again this time based on an in-construction theme park that soon becomes overrun by dinosaurs that had been brought back from extinction. The dinosaurs were created with groundbreaking computer-generated imagery which shocked many (including myself) on release. This film was groundbreaking and is the only time the idea has been done. sequels were considered but I heard they were all canned.

Pride (2003): This movie touches me personally as it explores the story of a gay teen in the 1980s florid as he comes to terms with his sexuality and a new love will also exploring the changing laws and stigma of the times. This film was a personal flashback to my times when I was younger and facing the same question. Directed by fellow gay man, Dustin Lance Black. The film was a smash hit when it was released though it would be overshadowed by the films, we would release this year. This film is a must-watch for anyone who feels they don’t fit in with the default setting. A Sequel set in the 1990s is expected for 2014. I can confirm I have a cameo role.

The Final World
Dreamworks is an icon. They have changed the world just as much as we here at Disney have. There was great sadness when the world lost both my father and Max Fleischer. Hollywood has often portrayed the pair as become combative; foes ready to fight to claim the title of Hollywood king yet this was not the case. My father was a quiet man who got on well with Fleischer. The resson for this is simple. They were so alike, so ready to change everything that was known about the film. They were joined by like-minded people like Ub and the merry old folk of Disney. Hana-Barbra also helped craft this great group of people. all sharing the same ideals to create the best films and if the films were not well revived they always did their best to find out why and to change it.

They are not perfect men but they set out to do what was impossible and challenged the normal. Progressive politics are now more normal because of them and those who came after like my brother. To some, they were founders, pioneers, game changes, inventors. But to my family and many others. They are Max Fleischer and Walt Disney. Together they now sit in whatever afterlife there is. Still, making movies knowing one thing
They changed Hollywood.
1956-hollywood-citizen-news-max-fleischer-walt-disney-richard-fleischer-prod.jpg

(left to right: Walt Disney, Max Fleischer and Richard Fleischer )
And their story was not finished yet….
 
gained a victory over Warner Brothers as they poached Mel Blanc (voice of many characters in Warner Brothers shorts)
Nitpick (& I know I'm coming in late): it's correctly Warner Bros. (Lots of people get it wrong.) To borrow a phrase, "It's only pronounced Throatwarbler Mangrove." :openedeyewink:
Pinocchio was a ground-breaking achievement in the area of effects animation.
That became a Disney trademark, didn't it?
Of the film's $2.6 million costs, the studio earned 2.3 million in returns. It was a loss of three million
Say what? :confounded:

The new studio held more than just the animation building, however. The Hyperion Bungalow was home to Disney Publicity and Comic Strip Departments. It was here for the first time Disney began to make its comics in-house before shipping them out. With this move, more comic cook creators were able to join the studio and the number of comics jumped. Before the Move Mickey was the only one to have his own comic but as soon as the Hyperion Bungalow was up and running Disney comics exploded. Snow White, Oswald, Donald, Goofy, and Pluto all got their own comics.
How's Disney distributing them? More to the point, why wouldn't Disney Studios simply licence the characters to an existing publisher (which is what routinely happened OTL)?
 
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Nitpick (& I know I'm coming in late): it's correctly Warner Bros. (Lots of people get it wrong.) To borrow a phrase, "It's only pronounced Throatwarbler Mangrove." :openedeyewink:

That became a Disney trademark, didn't it?

Say what? :confounded:


How's Disney distributing them? More to the point, why wouldn't Disney Studios simply licence the characters to an existing publisher (which is what routinely happened OTL)?
Welcome onboard!
Things like that slipped through the cracks, unfortunately. Lesson learned though
Disney makes the comics in house. More control over the content plus Walt is wearier after his fight over oswald. however, William Randolph Hearst does publish the comics on behalf of the company.
 
Things like that slipped through the cracks, unfortunately. Lesson learned though
Hey, it happens. ;)
Disney makes the comics in house. More control over the content plus Walt is wearier after his fight over oswald. however, William Randolph Hearst does publish the comics on behalf of the company.
I can see Hearst publishing strips. He's not a comic book publisher or distributor. Neither is Disney. What you've got is something akin to a studio able to provide contract art to Marvel or DC (or Dell, which did a lot of licence publishing). What I'm not seeing is how you translate the art Disney artists are producing into books on the racks.

Which company you choose has a big influence on how popular the books are (limited distribution means less exposure), even given their appearance in shorts.

The popularity of the shorts, OTOH, strongly affects how much Disney Studios can charge as a licence fee, which (obviously) impacts which company can afford to pay to publish them.

Unless you mean to say Disney has bought an established publisher, or set up one. In that case, you still have issues with distribution, because there weren't a lot of distributors at the time--&, AIUI, the biggest was owned/controlled by what became DC. (In the licence situation, it's the publisher's problem, but that's something Walt would have to consider before choosing: if the publisher can't get distribution, or adequate distribution, you don't sign with him.)

While it's long past its sell-by date, now,:rolleyes: for the record: conceptually, EPCOT was brilliant, but the execution struck me as pretty fascist, with such strict regulations on everything. (Maybe that's the only way it could have worked, IDK.) Unless I've confused it with a theme park...which (AIUI) it may have turned into, when the original concept was unworkable.
 
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Hey, it happens. ;)

I can see Hearst publishing strips. He's not a comic book publisher or distributor. Neither is Disney. What you've got is something akin to a studio able to provide contract art to Marvel or DC (or Dell, which did a lot of licence publishing). What I'm not seeing is how you translate the art Disney artists are producing into books on the racks.

Which company you choose has a big influence on how popular the books are (limited distribution means less exposure), even given their appearance in shorts.

The popularity of the shorts, OTOH, strongly affects how much Disney Studios can charge as a licence fee, which (obviously) impacts which company can afford to pay to publish them.

Unless you mean to say Disney has bought an established publisher, or set up one. In that case, you still have issues with distribution, because there weren't a lot of distributors at the time--&, AIUI, the biggest was owned/controlled by what became DC. (In the licence situation, it's the publisher's problem, but that's something Walt would have to consider before choosing: if the publisher can't get distribution, or adequate distribution, you don't sign with him.)

While it's long past its sell-by date, now,:rolleyes: for the record: conceptually, EPCOT was brilliant, but the execution struck me as pretty fascist, with such strict regulations on everything. (Maybe that's the only way it could have worked, IDK.) Unless I've confused it with a theme park...which (AIUI) it may have turned into, when the original concept was unworkable.
There's a lot in the early days of this timeline that was overlooked but this has become a learning experience. been writing for ten years next year and now beginning to finally get somewhere. The biggest thing to note Is when researching. read the thing more than once and make sure things make sense.
Epcot was great as a theme park. it focused on progress etc but now like the other parks there forcing in properties.
The actual EPCOT Though boy. There's a reason Andrew Ryan in Bioshock looks a bit like Walt Disney. that place would have been hell to live in. considering the standard they hold staff up today.
 
The biggest thing to note Is when researching.
Yeah, fer sher. There's kind of a rule in mystery fiction: "Somebody always knows the subject better than you." In short, make sure you've got it right.

I wouldn't bring it up at all if the rest wasn't good. I wouldn't have bothered to read that far. :)
 
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