Chapter Thirty-Eight: The Renaissance of Disney

Chapter Thirty-Eight: The Renaissance of Disney

Historians today classify the 1990s as the start of the Disney Renaissance. In every aspect. From live-action films to animation, from theme parks to video games. The studio came alive again. coupled together with the feel-good era that began again in the 1990s. the studio was ready to divide and conquer again. it was set on reclaiming its crowing. The resurgence allowed Disney's animated films to become powerhouse successes at the box office, earning a much greater profit than most of the Disney films of previous eras. Don Bluth was ready with so many ideas for animated productions. To some, he was the best thing to join the studio since the days of Walt, Ub and the merry old folk of Disney. Bluth however was not alone. He was joined by Glen Keane, Kirk Wise, Kevin Lima, Ron Clements, Gary Trousdale, Linda Woolverton. This group of people were dubbed the new Merry old folk. Though it was a name they would not adapt, instead, they became known as the New Age Renaissance Group.

Together they worked in the animation department with many other animators. There was an A-team and a b team. Allowing them to produce more animated films. After Beauty and the Beast, the A-team moved on to make Aladdin. Howard Ashman had pitched the idea of an animated musical adaptation of Aladdin. Ashman had written a 40-page film treatment remaining faithful to the plot and characters of the original story. Howard Ashman and Alan Menken had been key to Disney’s last two major hits and now they were officially hired on contact to work on Disney movies. Bluth Ate up the Aladdin idea however some of the ideas were not agreeable so Bluth had Linda Woolverton work closely with Ashman to rework the script. A reference to Jasmine’s age was dropped alongside Aladdin’s mother. Jasmine was also given much more of a role than originally planned. Belle and Jasmine were the first power-house princesses as they are now known. Those who do much more in terms of plot and action. The change was made as women’s roles in Hollywood shifted further.

Casting for Aladdin was key to the studio. Scott Weinger was cast as Aladdin with Linda Larkin as Jasmine, Jonathan Freeman as Jafar, Douglas Seale as the Sultan. When it came to the Genie, there was only one man Disney wanted. Musker and Clements created the Genie with Robin Williams in mind; even though actors such as John Candy, Steve Martin, and Eddie Murphy were all suggested. Williams at the time was open to the idea but was busy filming other projects. He eventually agreed and his lines were filmed during his breaks. Many of his lines ended up ad-libbed with only topics given to Williams to help him along. Williams and Disney would begin a working partnership with Aladdin. That would soon lead to the actor to join Oceanview high in its biggest shakeup. Aladdin was released on November 25, 1992. It soon reached both critical and commercial success. It became the highest-grossing film of 1992 with an earning of over $504 million at the worldwide box office. Upon release, it became the first animated feature to reach the half-billion-dollar mark and was the highest-grossing animated film of all time for a short time.

Well, the A-team worked on Aladdin. The b-team worked on two smaller projects. The first was Fantastic Mr Fox. The studio had always meant to adapt other dahl stories but circumstances had left them unable to. Now with an A-team and a b-team they could. The first was Fantastic Mr Fox. The B-team wanted to stay true to Walt’s idea of finding talent so they quickly turned to find someone new who could make the film. It was a risky movie trusting such a project with such a newcomer but the b-team were allowed to take risks. After thousands of applicants, they selected recent graduate Wes Anderson. Anderson was a gamble and his choice to cast his friend Owen Wilson as the main character was another risky one though it was counter-balanced by the casting of Bill Murray. But the studio had taken a gamble on Spielberg and he had become one of Hollywood’s biggest directors. The film was released on March 5th 1993 to critical acclaim. It made 342 million worldwide and gave both Wilson and Anderson an opening into Hollywood.

After the success of Fantastic Mr Fox. The speed on their next project, Hercules, increased. Hercules was going to be an A-team project but they were extremely busy so they passed it down. The studio threw itself headfirst into the production of Hercules. They hoped to replicate the successes of fantastic Mr-fox. Ron Clements was brought on to direct the project. Alan Menken and Howard Ashman switched to the b-team to do the movie for the project. The pair would not be exclusive to either team. Randy Cartwright was brought on to do the story for the project, his first project solo. Tate Donovan was cast as Hercules well Josh Keaton provided the speaking voice of Hercules as a teenager, while Roger Bart provided his singing voice. James woods nearly secured the part of Hades but the studio instead went with Willem Dafoe. For every Disney animated feature since Beauty and the Beast. Susan Egan had auditioned for a role now she got it and was cast as Megara. Danny DeVito took on the role of Philoctetes. On June 14th 1993, Hercules was released. It would earn $252.7 million at the box office. Hercules would join Beauty and the Beast, Aladdin, and snow queen in gaining more Oscars for Disney.

Well, the b-team worked on those two projects. the A-team worked on its next big project and a personal one for don Bluth. That would be Land before time. Bluth had been trying to get the film made since 1988 but Disney was not prepared as they believed at the time fairy tales was the only way they needed to. Bluth considered leaving but he soon gained control over the animation studio. After finishing the projects already in the works, he turned to land before time. James Horner was selected to compose the music, a change from Ashman and Menken however the project was not a musical. Pixar Studio, the computer animation, division of Disney, would work alongside Bluth to make the project well Steven Spielberg would produce alongside Bluth. The film's theme song "If We Hold on Together" was sung by Diana Ross. Even before the film was released, there were some talks of sequels but Bluth vetoed these. He instead suggested a tv program if the film was successful. The Land Before Time opened on November 18, 1993.

Over at Elias Productions. JFK. Jr faced two problems. Two unfinished franchises that had landed on his desk. The first was a sensitive film. Batman forever was just getting into production when Tim burton and Theodore lost their life’s. Production then stopped and nobody knew if it would continue. Sam Hamm campaigned for the film to go on in memory well the actors also spoke out in favour of the project. JFK. Jr turned to Peter and Lillian Disney who were the children of Theodore to see what to do. After lengthy discussions, the film was greenlit to continue. Batman forever would go on. Michelle Pfeiffer returned as catwomen alongside Michael Keaton as Bruce/Wayne batman and Michael Gough as Alfred. Corey Haim also returned as Dick Grayson. The film was to try to use as much footage from burton’s film as they could but much was needed to be re-filmed.


To do that a new director and producer would be needed. Sam Hamm agreed to join as writer well Kathryn Bigelow joined on as director. The studio turned to steven Spielberg as producer. He had worked on superman and knew the ropes. Plans for a superman cameo were scrapped though Supergirl is referenced alongside metropolis. Had Burton lived the next film would have been Batman and Superman. As for the villain, there were two contenders. The Riddler and Mr Freeze. The Riddler was burton’s original choice and so the team decided to stick with it. burton and Disney had been in talks for casting the character when they died. Johnny Depp was cast as the villain well Celine Dion was selected to sing the films title song (I still believe) alongside Danny Elfman who agreed to compose the score one last time. The film was dedicated to the memory of Theodore Disney and Tim burton. On June 16th 1992, Batman forever released. Soon theatres reported being overwhelmed. The film earned 52.8 million in its opening weekend with many flocking to see it as it was officially Tim burton and Theodore Disney’s last film well also being another Batman film. The film went on to earn $336.53 million at the box office. The final chapter in the burton batman films.

Well, batman came to another close. Another franchise was also set to have its final bow. Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade. Streep and ford both wanted out of the project by Fate of Atlantis. So both agreed to one final film made by Orion film. Steven Spielberg also agreed to return for one final time as did John Williams as a composer with Lawrence Kasdan on board to write the project. The film was to go all out to end a franchise that had become one of pop culture’s most recognisable. The film shifted back to the Nazis and also planned to wrap up the Indiana/Marion romance plot with a wedding. To this end the film leaned heavily on family with Sean Connery as Henry Jones, Sr. the last crusade however would be far from the end as River Phoenix was a younger Indiana Jones for the project. Giving the studio ideas. Yet for ford and the others. The last crusade was the final adventure. The film was released in the United States and Canada on May 24, 1993. On a budget of $48 million, it earned 474.3 million dollars. The film would go on to be considered the best in the franchise and even won ford and Connery Oscars for their roles.

The film was to be the end of Harrison ford’s time as Indiana Jones. But the studio and JFK jr were far from done with the franchise. River Phoenix had been cast as young Indiana Jones in the last crusade. Ford had recommended Phoenix for the part; he said that of the young actors working at the time, Phoenix looked the most like him when he was around that age. Phoenix was about to get a role that he would remain in for decades as the studio approached him for a three-picture deal Starting with the Indiana Jones: The First Adventure which would serve as an origin story for the character. Spielberg passed on directing duties to George Miller well John Williams and Lawrence Kasdan both agreed to return. The film did not use the raiders march, only hints of it would be given throughout the 3 prequel films. Indiana Jones: The First Adventure was released on May 25th 1995 and earned 274.3 million dollars at the box office. the second prequel film Indiana Jones: and the legend of Eldorado was released on May 25th 1997 and earned 311.2 million dollars. The final prequel film introduced Elizabeth Mitchell as a young Marion and was titled Indiana Jones and the Legend of King Arthur. It was released on May 25th 1998 and ended with Phoenix’s Jones picking up the whip for the first time alongside the first full usage of the raiders march in the prequel films. It earned 423 million dollars at the box office. with the prequel series over, many saw it likely that Phoenix would return as Jones once more.

Well, the young Indiana prequels stormed the box office. JFK Jr turned to smaller projects. the first of these was 1991’s Arachnophobia. Directed by Frank Marshall. JFK Jr had always had a fear of spiders and wanted to tell a tale of that on film. The film was released in the United States on July 18, 1991. It was a modest commercial success, earning $53.21 million at the box office. The next project was sister act. Disney’s attempt to cash in on the boom of musicals in the 1990s. directed by Emile Ardolino and starring Whoopi Goldberg the film was extremely successful for Disney. Earning l $231 million worldwide after its release on December 4th 1992. The next film for JFK JR and his studio would be Halloween IV which focused on a plot of witchcraft and child kidnapping. It was released on October 31st 1993 and earned 312 million dollars worldwide. Well, the film studios boomed, Peter Disney found himself in Japan working with Nintendo. The studio had continued to push out new franchise’s that were dominating the market. Metroid, DuckTales and Legend of Zelda joined the others in becoming dominant game series. Peter Disney was not there however to work on a game. Disney was buying out capcom to increase its game output. The deal was done by 1994 and cost the studio 23 million dollars. Capcom would continue being its own thing but it would work closely with Nintendo.

Peter Disney also had his hand in three other projects in the mid-1990s. Peter Disney turned to verity lambert who was set to retire in 1993. She had a long term at Disney but her time was up. She would work closely with Peter to create her final project. The Oswald Showcase Show. The show featured Oswald hosting a reality tv show as different toons fought for a place in toon-town. The premise was to set up shorts that would debut new ideas and cartons with many going on to get their tv shows. The show continues to this day and some of the shows included in the 1990s were: Johnny Bravo, Courage the Cowardly Dog, Mike, Sheep in the Big City, Codename: Kids Next Door and Family Guy. Anyone could submit an idea to show and get it made. The show began airing in 1993 and also pushed Oswald back into the limelight again.

The second was newsies, the studio's next attempt to capitalise on the movie-musical boom. The film was to be based on a real-life event when newsboys strike in 1899. Howard Ashman And Alan Menken joined on the project, making it their first live-action film in years. Emile Ardolino, director of sister act, was brought on board to direct the film. One interesting thing about the film was Robin Williams. He had played Théodore Roosevelt for DreamWorks but now he returned to play the character this time for newsies. On a budget of $15 million, newsies earned 26 million when it was released on December 2nd 1994. It was not a major success but would go on to become a cult classic.

Finally, Peter Disney had his hand in was the founding of Disney-toon Studios. Sequels were often considered for past films yet none had been made. Peter did not want to take away focus from the main studio so toon studios were born with the sole intent of sifting through the past movies to find ideas that could work as sequels. The first would be Cinderella which was given a time-travel twist that changed the first film’s story and gave each of the ugly sisters a happy ending. Disney put as much funding into toon studios as it did the others but mostly hired up and coming animators to work on the project. Cinderella II: A Twist in Time was released on March third 1995 and was a major success. Toon studios quickly turned to find other films that could work as sequels.
 
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I've never heard of a show called "Mike": is that one original to this world?

As for Nintendo, I'll follow up on an idea I discussed earlier. I think that the original Mother would be released in the early 90s, then we would have Earthbound released in the mid-90s for SNES (probably under a different name, though-the working English title for the original was "Earth Bound"). Mother 3 would be out of the scope of this thread, unless Earthbound 64 is created here.
 
I've never heard of a show called "Mike": is that one original to this world?
I think he was referring to Mike, Lu, & Og. But that's just me.
As for Nintendo, I'll follow up on an idea I discussed earlier. I think that the original Mother would be released in the early 90s, then we would have Earthbound released in the mid-90s for SNES (probably under a different name, though-the working English title for the original was "Earth Bound"). Mother 3 would be out of the scope of this thread, unless Earthbound 64 is created here.
Sounds good to me!
 
This new chapter shows great promises for the future, as you would have expected. As for my favorite reveals?

1: The first Disney-Toon Studios film being Cinderella: A Twist in Time.
2: The Oswald Showcase Show bringing some of OTL Cartoon Network's biggest shows to the Disney brand.
3: Disney buying Capcom in 1994 and having them work quite often with Nintendo.
4: DuckTales: The New Adventures becoming a hit game series in its own right, and likely spawning more game adaptations of Disney's newer animated programs.
5: Robin Williams still being cast as The Genie.

As an addendum, I can't help but feel like Summer of Invention, or whatever the proto-P&F series is called, would be a great simulation game for the NES or SNES or any other Nintendo systems.
 
It is indeed Mike, Lu, & Og. I messed up with Grammarly on that one. I will edit it back.
Has anyone get any other thoughts or questions on this chapter?
I've never heard of a show called "Mike": is that one original to this world?

As for Nintendo, I'll follow up on an idea I discussed earlier. I think that the original Mother would be released in the early 90s, then we would have Earthbound released in the mid-90s for SNES (probably under a different name, though-the working English title for the original was "Earth Bound"). Mother 3 would be out of the scope of this thread, unless Earthbound 64 is created here.
I will see about adding that in one of the upcoming chapters. See what it can fit in. Maybe work it in a a reference to a television show based on the series. I can tell you the next chapter is the star wars prequels. we will miss the sequels because of the timeline's scope but if anyone has anything on the prequels they wanna ask or put forward.
 
This new chapter shows great promises for the future, as you would have expected. As for my favorite reveals?

1: The first Disney-Toon Studios film being Cinderella: A Twist in Time.
2: The Oswald Showcase Show bringing some of OTL Cartoon Network's biggest shows to the Disney brand.
3: Disney buying Capcom in 1994 and having them work quite often with Nintendo.
4: DuckTales: The New Adventures becoming a hit game series in its own right, and likely spawning more game adaptations of Disney's newer animated programs.
5: Robin Williams still being cast as The Genie.

As an addendum, I can't help but feel like Summer of Invention, or whatever the proto-P&F series is called, would be a great simulation game for the NES or SNES or any other Nintendo systems.
I spent quite a lot of time reading reviews for the sequels. On which to cut and which to keep. more often than not the third Cinderella film topped lists and reviews. the others will come. the one's considered good anyway. They have a right to exist. However, things like Mulan II can stay in the void.
Had to fit Oswald in somewhere. keep him relevant. Being the first character it feels right to have him invite new cartoons into the toon world.
Capcom and Nintendo should work together Nicely. a bit like Elias productions and the animation studio. one is more family-friendly than the other.
Disney needs a better presence in video games. Like a proper one with its own characters. There are things like kingdom hearts but I wouldn't say thats' accessible to everyone.
and Yes Robin Williams is The Genie/The Riddler and Theodore Roosevelt in the same decade. I like to change casts up when I can but he made that film. there's no Aladdin without Robin Williams. the thing butterflied away here is his disagreements with Disney.
The next chapter is star wars but the chapter after that is tv and boy is there quite a few shows to talk about. the proto p+f show should return alongside the game you suggested.
 
May as well do this now. A list of possible video game cartoons for Disney here.

Certain:
-Mario
-Zelda
-Pokemon
-Mega Man
-Pajama Sam

Likely:
-Street Fighter
-Metroid
-Monkey Island
-Putt-Putt

"Dark horse" candidates:
-Earthbound/Mother
-Sam and Max
-Ghosts and Goblins

If anyone has any other ideas feel free to add them. I only put franchises within the thread's scope, so no Phoenix Wright yet.
 
May as well do this now. A list of possible video game cartoons for Disney here.

Certain:
-Mario
-Zelda
-Pokemon
-Mega Man
-Pajama Sam

Likely:
-Street Fighter
-Metroid
-Monkey Island
-Putt-Putt

"Dark horse" candidates:
-Earthbound/Mother
-Sam and Max
-Ghosts and Goblins

If anyone has any other ideas feel free to add them. I only put franchises within the thread's scope, so no Phoenix Wright yet.
well
I can tell you now
Mario is getting a movie and so will Zelda. they can likely spin of into tv shows. Grim Fandango is also getting a movie.
As for the rest. we will have to see what happens though I am bookmarking this just incase.
 
May as well do this now. A list of possible video game cartoons for Disney here.
Certain:
-Mario
-Zelda
-Pokemon
-Mega Man
-Pajama Sam
Of course these guys would get their dues.
Likely:
-Street Fighter
-Metroid
-Monkey Island
-Putt-Putt
Of these four, I'd say that Metroid is the least likely. Not quite a dark horse candidate, but we might need to wait until the 2000s for a Metroid cartoon.
"Dark horse" candidates:
-Earthbound/Mother
-Sam and Max
-Ghosts and Goblins
Yeah, these ones are not as likely as their fans would want, but I can still see potential.
If anyone has any other ideas feel free to add them. I only put franchises within the thread's scope, so no Phoenix Wright yet.
I think the likes of Freddi Fish, Maniac Mansion, Darkstalkers, and Kirby would be great additions to the lineup.
 
I'd say that Kirby, Freddi Fish, and Maniac Mansion would be likely: even if I think Maniac Mansion is more movie material.

As for Darkstalkers: I really don't know a lot about this series, and considering who its most famous character is I doubt it would be cartoon material, but then again it apparently got a cartoon in our world so who knows.
 
I'd say that Kirby, Freddi Fish, and Maniac Mansion would be likely: even if I think Maniac Mansion is more movie material.
One, I feel like Kirby should be the likeliest of the likely candidates, due to the OTL anime it got being a staple of the Fox Box block.
Two, @The Young Explorer is planning movies from Mario and Zelda first, then shows. So it's okay if Maniac Mansion gets a film to start.
As for Darkstalkers: I really don't know a lot about this series, and considering who its most famous character is I doubt it would be cartoon material, but then again it apparently got a cartoon in our world so who knows.
Perhaps it would be in a double bill with Courage the Cowardly Dog or Family Guy with help from Elias Entertainment? Just a thought.
 

kirbopher15

Kicked
The b-team worked on two smaller projects. The first was Fantastic Mr Fox. The studio had always meant to adapt other dahl stories but circumstances had left them unable to. Now with an A-team and a b-team they could. The first was Fantastic Mr Fox. The B-team wanted to stay true to Walt’s idea of finding talent so they quickly turned to find someone new who could make the film. It was a risky movie trusting such a project with such a newcomer but the b-team were allowed to take risks. After thousands of applicants, they selected recent graduate Wes Anderson. Anderson was a gamble and his choice to cast his friend Owen Wilson as the main character was another risky one though it was counter-balanced by the casting of Bill Murray. But the studio had taken a gamble on Spielberg and he had become one of Hollywood’s biggest directors. The film was released on March 5th 1993 to critical acclaim. It made 342 million worldwide and gave both Wilson and Anderson an opening into Hollywood.
Will the brat pack later get ahold of them for Rushmore
 
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