Yeah, Koko is the best pick for that, honestly speaking.

On that regard, could we see Warner Bros. become the first company to dub anime? I mean, yes, they did dub anime here and there during their Seven Arts days, but if we're going to have a constant stream of oneupmanship, why not have WB get in touch with Osamu Tezuka or Fujiko F. Fujio?

Why not have Hanna and Barbera run the studio with some changes? Fleischer Studios can be renamed as DreamWorks Pictures, Hanna-Barbera Productions can be retitled as DreamWorks Television, and when the gaming industry comes to the States, the combined elements of DreamWorks would be perfect for numerous genres of gaming history.

Finally, I was thinking we could have porcelain figures of the Disney characters for the bigger spenders in the world, as well as some sort of annual sweepstakes contest during the summer months where one Saturday in July is taken over by Walt Disney Television and Marceline Animation on CBS's televised lineup from 7 A.M. to 8 in the evening. I'm talking like a variety of animated shows and movies from the past few years, ranging from The Oswald and Mickey Revue to Walt Disney Presents to Fantasia. If it's animated from the Walt Disney Company for theaters or TV, chances are that it will be part of the annual takeover/telethon/sweepstakes.
Sort of like this...

The grand prize would be a family pack of tickets to Disneyland, but there are also lesser prizes like free Disney movies for a year from your local theaterhouse, or a Davy Crockett hat. That is, if Disney still makes the Davy Crockett series.

Oh, and one more thing, the takeover sweepstakes would be capped off by a special 90-minute episode of WDP that gives you sneak peeks of what's going to happen on television from good old Uncle Walt. Basically combining the video I just sent with From All of Us to All of You and the classic Saturday Morning preview specials from the OTL 80s and 90s.

What do you think of all this?
You hit the idea on the head with Hanna and Barbera running the studio and making changes. It will happen, makes the most sense plus they both lived quite a long time so they could easily run the studios up until the 80s and 90s.

Your idea works and makes sense. One up FS and get the merch ball rolling. Davy Crockett is up in the air because of an earlier film they did but its feasible it could still exist. Wrapping it up with a, what's coming this fall also keeps the hype up. I feel like there is a lot of golden chances for merch here. And I think Disney needs to be less uptight with there former catalogue. Never begun the Disney Vault idea at all and keep releases for films going. I will use your idea come the mid sixties around the time of Disney world. And I like the idea that warner brothers does the anime first so not to give everything to the other two. Anyone hoping for in-depth anime sections though will find themselves wanting because its something I know nothing about.

On that note it Also gives me the idea of CBS doing a charity event each year, like children in need here in England. That way all the Hollywood companies can come together to try one up each other in raising money for charity. Since I am not aware which country you are from. I will put this here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children_in_Need.
I hope you can butterfly JFK's assassination and Vietnam...
I stand by not making this political though how viable that is its yet to be seen considering we are about 10/20 years away from president Disney but I will say this. This is trying to be a better world which means JFK will not be assassinated. Id also like to think he's more of a decent person here but that remains to be seen. Vietnam is an odd one, its a bad thing as we know but it shaped a lot of culture in the 60s. Though it also made LBJ unlikely to ever be considered a great president so it has its wins and losses. SO JFK lives but Vietnam I am unsure of. Open to thoughts about Vietnam.
 
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You hit the idea on the head with Hanna and Barbera running the studio and making changes. It will happen, makes the most sense plus they both lived quite a long time so they could easily run the studios up until the 80s and 90s.

Your idea works and makes sense. One up FS and get the merch ball rolling. Davy Crockett is up in the air because of an earlier film they did but its feasible it could still exist. Wrapping it up with a, what's coming this fall also keeps the hype up. I feel like there is a lot of golden chances for merch here. And I think Disney needs to be less uptight with there former catalogue. Never begun the Disney Vault idea at all and keep releases for films going. I will use your idea come the mid sixties around the time of Disney world. And I like the idea that warner brothers does the anime first so not to give everything to the other two. Anyone hoping for in-depth anime sections though will find themselves wanting because its something I know nothing about.

On that note it Also gives me the idea of CBS doing a charity event each year, like children in need here in England. That way all the Hollywood companies can come together to try one up each other in raising money for charity. Since I am not aware which country you are from. I will put this here; https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Children_in_Need.
Thanks! My first idea for a successor was having Seymour Kneitel run the studio, but he died in 1964. So that's a bust.

Cool for Davy Crockett's legacy potentially still existing as is. Although, I did grow up with the Disney Vault promotions and saw nothing wrong with it as a kid. But that might be my Disney bias talking here. Plus, in WB's favor, they are kinda lacking in news coverage ITTL, so making them the anime powerhouses of "ye olden dayes" in the 60s would be a surprising shift in the world of animation.

I'm actually from the United States of America. And I do know about the Children in Need thing. Honestly, the ability to see all the big heavy-hitters in Hollywood promoting themselves for a good cause is too good not to pay both attention and money to.
Heck, why not have Roger Rabbit exist ITTL, but as the mascot for this American version of the charity event? I mean, have you seen the amount of cameos in that movie? Making him the mascot of this whole endeavor would be the icing on the cake.
 
Since there's no mention of Hanna-Barbera's television work (which at the end of the 50s would consist of Ruff and Reddy, Huckleberry Hound, and Quick Draw McGraw), I assume that it will be covered in a chapter focusing on television of the 1950s.

Also, since Fleischer seems intent on making animated features for adults, I feel this is a good point to bring up Ralph Bakshi. At this point, he is a minor animator at Terrytoons, but eventually he will go off on his own and create animated movies with darker and more mature themes than anything else at the time. My guess is that the success of Fritz the Cat (his directorial debut and, in our world, the highest-grossing independent animated movie) is what puts him on Fleischer's radar, and from there who knows what could happen?
 
Thanks! My first idea for a successor was having Seymour Kneitel run the studio, but he died in 1964. So that's a bust.

Cool for Davy Crockett's legacy potentially still existing as is. Although, I did grow up with the Disney Vault promotions and saw nothing wrong with it as a kid. But that might be my Disney bias talking here. Plus, in WB's favor, they are kinda lacking in news coverage ITTL, so making them the anime powerhouses of "ye olden dayes" in the 60s would be a surprising shift in the world of animation.

I'm actually from the United States of America. And I do know about the Children in Need thing. Honestly, the ability to see all the big heavy-hitters in Hollywood promoting themselves for a good cause is too good not to pay both attention and money to.
Heck, why not have Roger Rabbit exist ITTL, but as the mascot for this American version of the charity event? I mean, have you seen the amount of cameos in that movie? Making him the mascot of this whole endeavor would be the icing on the cake.
Now and as I grew up. Roger Rabbit was always a film that was re-watchable no matter what. Giveing him an extended role like the others is a perfect idea. Can preserve his film too and even have a resson to make the planned but never made sequels, Roger Rabbit deserved more but somethings I wonder if that film was a bit to adult for Disney. The Lack of WB is due to the fact I was trying not to over complicate this with focus on three studios but since FS is about to get a ton of universal properties. I am sure we can spare a look at warner brothers at some point, make them the anime powerhouse as well.
Since there's no mention of Hanna-Barbera's television work (which at the end of the 50s would consist of Ruff and Reddy, Huckleberry Hound, and Quick Draw McGraw), I assume that it will be covered in a chapter focusing on television of the 1950s.

Also, since Fleischer seems intent on making animated features for adults, I feel this is a good point to bring up Ralph Bakshi. At this point, he is a minor animator at Terrytoons, but eventually he will go off on his own and create animated movies with darker and more mature themes than anything else at the time. My guess is that the success of Fritz the Cat (his directorial debut and, in our world, the highest-grossing independent animated movie) is what puts him on Fleischer's radar, and from there who knows what could happen?
Though the next FS chapter will be the 1960s, it will also cover there earlier 1950 TV shows when it talks about the heavy hitters of the 1960s. You know I had never heard of Ralph Bakshi till now but you just made a connection to FS. In this timeline they will make LOTR in animated form and since Ralph Bakshi worked on that OTL he can fit right in with them. I will have to read though his wiki page to understand more but so far its making sense to include him. Thanks for bringing him to my attention.
 
SO JFK lives but Vietnam I am unsure of. Open to thoughts about Vietnam.
According to some historical sources, JFK wasn't eager to draw US support to Vietnam; apparently, he was hoping to withdraw US support (what little there was; military advisers and non-combatant helicopter pilots, mainly) completely by the end of 1963-early 1964.

So yeah, no assassination, no Vietnam.
 
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According to some historical sources, JFK wasn't eager to draw US support to Vietnam; apparently, he was hoping to withdraw US support (what little there was; military advisers and non-combatant helicopter pilots, mainly) completely by the end of 1963-early 1964.

So yeah, no assassination, no Vietnam.
Perfect then. More Easier then expected. We do kinda need to butterfly away many of the big problems to save a few Disney projects. One I have not yet mentioned is 9/11. Somehow some way the twin towers will feature in this timeline. Those buildings where never the most nicest looking of buildings but by god they made the new York skyline stand out. So if you or anyone here has any way we can utilize the world trade centre without blowing it up. I would be greatly thankful. Then maybe the pop century resort and twa can both survive.
 
My idea for TTL's Roger Rabbit is something closer to the book (I'd recommend listening to this audiobook version by Son of Herodotus here); I figured it could release in 1984-1985, and star Paul Reubens as Roger, Peter Renaday as Eddie, and Russi Taylor as Jessica. Directed by a then-pair of up-and-coming brothers called the Coens.
 
My idea for TTL's Roger Rabbit is something closer to the book (I'd recommend listening to this audiobook version by Son of Herodotus here); I figured it could release in 1984-1985, and star Paul Reubens as Roger, Peter Renaday as Eddie, and Russi Taylor as Jessica. Directed by a then-pair of up-and-coming brothers called the Coens.
That way, the Roger we know IOTL that hangs out with classic cartoon characters can be shown in the CBS charity event. Genius!
 
My idea for TTL's Roger Rabbit is something closer to the book (I'd recommend listening to this audiobook version by Son of Herodotus here); I figured it could release in 1984-1985, and star Paul Reubens as Roger, Peter Renaday as Eddie, and Russi Taylor as Jessica. Directed by a then-pair of up-and-coming brothers called the Coens.
That way, the Roger we know IOTL that hangs out with classic cartoon characters can be shown in the CBS charity event. Genius!
Anyway to Preserve Roger and allow him to be a charity icon. I will listen to that at some point soon. Also that casting is perfect. Russi Taylor deserves more recognition.
 
So the 1960s are here but before we move forward we have a problem that we haven't dealt with yet. So far we have saved quite a few people which is great but there's one coming up I need solutions for. That being Sharon Tate and her murder at the hands of the Manson family. Well on that subject, how do we also deal with Roman Polanski.
 
That being Sharon Tate and her murder at the hands of the Manson family. Well on that subject, how do we also deal with Roman Polanski.
1) Perhaps his second imprisonment goes far more pear-shaped, resulting in a longer sentence?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson#Second_imprisonment (it's better than what I was gonna suggest initially, which was having Manson targeting Dennis Wilson and killing him, Brian, and Carl)

2) ...Good question.
 
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1) Perhaps his second imprisonment goes far more pear-shaped, resulting in a longer sentence?: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Manson#Second_imprisonment (it's better than what I was gonna suggest initially, which was having Manson targeting Dennis Wilson and killing him, Brian, and Carl)

2) ...Good question.
Firstly, that happens in a hearts of iron four mod tbf. The Manson family kill the beach boys. But a longer imprisonment works, anything to save her life.
Secondly: is he redeemable is the question. If Polanski is deemed saveable then I will look into doing that otherwise there's only one other option.
 
Chapter Eighteen: A New Decade, New Productions

Chapter Eighteen: A New Decade, New Productions

Times had changed and now anything was possible. The swinging sixties were here to shake everything up again. A youth-driven cultural revolution stormed the western world with whole cultural styles shifting. With a sexual revolution on the horizon, Hollywood found itself stuck inside the middle of a cyclone uprooting the old and implanting new ideas. Disney and the other studios found themselves under full frontal assault from a new generation who called for change. Today Hollywood is known as the bastion of progress or the city of tomorrow but that only truly began when it embraced the movements that begun to ignite across the country. The election of John F Kennedy was only the beginning. And now, In this new decade. Anything goes.

Before this new storm could make landfall there was a grace period, it was the early 1960 and the lull of the 1950s still remained. America was for the most part at peace even though the cold war still burned. Inside the Disney studios, they began to see the success of musical records. Their films had limited soundtrack releases but nothing major had yet taken the world by storm. Yet by now, disposable income meant many families had record players and weekends became dominated by music. Walt was more than prepared to strike the gold mine and established The Roy Disney Music Corporation. The new subsidiary would release Disney’s movie soundtracks starting with the war of the worlds and Cinderella. Yet the RDMC also soon found actual clients wanting to work with them this movement was led by one man.

Buddy Holly was once an extremely popular music star in America. He is often regarded as the artist who defined the traditional rock-and-roll lineup of two guitars, bass, and drums. Yet Holly wanted to break out from his role, his music was still extremely popular but he wanted to make it big in Hollywood too. When he came calling to Hollywood in early 1961, he found himself inside The Roy Disney Music Corporation building and very soon made a deal with the company. They would release his new music while also pushing him to star in films. The first of these would be the sequel road to Broadway which was the second of three movies. The cast from the first film all returned alongside new characters played by buddy holly and Debbie Reynolds. The film is known today for its hit song. The Rules of Broadway sang by buddy holly and Debbie Reynolds. The film was a major success upon release in 1962 and would be followed by a third and final sequel in 1966.

By 1966 the sexual liberation movement had taken hold hard across America. John F Kennedy had passed the civil rights act of 1963 and won re-election a year later in 1964. Disney saw this and planned to capitalize on it. The Road to Las Vegas would have personal investment from Walt who once again wanted to challenge the normalities. The film would go down in gay rights history as it featured the first proper homosexual kiss on-screen between two men. Those being James Dean and George Disney. The film also ended with the supposed death of Monroe and Garland’s character. The film was protested upon its release in 1966 in the south but in the west and in a changing Europe the movie was a major hit and would be considered a vital moment for the move for rights. The film trilogy’s soundtrack would be released in 1967 and would become the biggest rated soundtrack for the studio.

Well, Theodore marched on with his road to movies. UB found an ever-changing world of animation. He believed innovation was needed if Disney was to keep up with the now massively popular Fleischer Studios. The film chosen for this new innovation would be the 1961 production of One Hundred and One Dalmatians. It is now considered amusing that One Hundred and One Dalmatians was adapted to film as writer Dodie Smith had hoped that Disney would turn the book into a motion picture. Smith was hired by the studio to work with Bill Peet to write the story and adapt it to the big screen. This would begin a common theme of letting alive writers work with the studios if they desired in making a film authentic to their book. Ub had more money to work on this project after the success of sleeping beauty. Peet would be tasked with voice recording and working on storyboards.

For the animation development. Progress was being made by Ub. He had been experimenting with Xerox photography to aid in animation and to make the cost cheaper. By 1959 he had modified a camera Xerox camera to transfer drawings by animators directly to animation cels, eliminating the inking process. This filled Walt’s requirement of saving both time and money which is something the studio needed to do. For One Hundred and One Dalmatians, one of the benefits of the process was that it was a great help towards animating the spotted dogs. Walt however was not all to please with the art direction the studio was going in and threatened to make sure Ken Anderson would never work for the studio again. the pair would makeup but it became clear to some that the now sixty-year-old Walt may be struggling to embrace change. 101 Dalmatian would be the last Disney film till the 1970s not to have involvement from the Sherman brothers as Mel Leven composed both lyrics and music.

One Hundred and One Dalmatians was first released in theatres on January 25, 1961. Walt Did not attend, the first premier he did attend to due knee surgery. Instead, Ub attended alongside Roy, Theodore, and the cast. The film grossed $14 million in the United States and Canada. It was also the most popular film of the year in France. Another success for Ub was good but Ub wanted to try something else out, to strive into the film territory Fleischer Studios had done. to make two animated films that were considered more adult with one still being family-friendly well the other served as a full-on adult film. The first would be an adaptation of the 1925 Broadway musical Dearest Enemy and would be Disney’s first historical movie but not their last. It was also the first Disney film the Sherman brothers would work on. The film did not do well at the box office when it was released in 1963 and was considered just an okay film by critics.

The other was made to rely on the liberation movement that had taken over America by 1965. Titled Hot And Cold the film followed a shunned bride getting revenge on her husband who couldn't muster up the courage to marry her and his friends for making the situation work. George Disney was cast in the role of the husband in order to try to dispute claims the media were making about him by this point. Newcomer to Hollywood Sharon Tate was cast as the main character. The film was once again scored by the Sherman brothers. Walt was shocked by the violence in the animated film and argued with Ub but both fell into silence as the film stormed the box office proving a market for more violent films. It also went on to win Tate a best Oscar nomination. She would not become a Disney actress like the others.

Marceline Animation continued its expansion in the early 1960s yet it would also herald the end of an era. Movie shorts had become less and less popular by the 1960s and soon full-length motion pictures were the norm. Disney had lasted the longest with their own shorts with Fleischer Studios closing up their own department in 1959. Now in 1963, the time had come at last and in the news that broke headlines. Disney closed its short departments for the last time, every person working in the department were offered jobs with many going to Marceline Animation which was continuing to go from strength to strength and despite the fact Fleischer Studios would overshadow them on television the studios did manage to punch out a few hits.

The first would air in 1962 and would be Disney’s biggest hit of the decade and it would be DuckTales. The show was based on other Disney properties such as Uncle Scrooge and other Duck universe comic books. It follows Scrooge McDuck, his three grandnephews Huey, Dewey, and Louie, and close friends of the group, on various adventures. The show was a major hit and brought together elements established throughout the years. The show would last for twelve years from 1964 to 1976. It would be then rebooted again in the early 1990s. the show expanded on the lore of the Disney verse and featured appearances from many characters the main being Oswald, Goofy, and Mickey. The second biggest TV hit for the studio began a collaboration with DC.

With batman coming to the screen as live-action they sought a superman animated show. Disney counter offered and an agreement was made. Disney would make a double bill show. That would become Super-Pets/Superman. The first show would feature the adventures of characters such as Krypto the super dog and bat Hound. The second show followed the adventures of Clark Kent/Superman and Lois Lane as they battled evil. Both were successful and brought in high numbers, it would last till 1969. The partnership with DC would only grow stronger after their collaboration here.

Well, the animation and live-action studios continued heavily on their work. Walt was also the busiest he could be. In 1962, he managed to enter a deal with Pan-Am that would make them the official airline for Disney in return they would sponsor a ride inside Disneyland. Walt in 1963 began to make the first indication of bringing something to Broadway establishing the foundation for the Ruth Disney Performing Arts Division that would be established in 1965 through what would be adapted as yet unknown. Walt also visited Japan for the first time in 1966. Nintendo had been struggling as a business selling the Disney cards and profits were down to bolster them the Disney company bought Nintendo and brought the cards to the states. And finally, later in 1966, Walt agreed on a deal with Pepsi that only its products would be sold in parks beginning a longer partnership.

Yet Walt would be drawn back to the studio more often than to as a book he really wanted to adapt became doable though the fight to adapt it was less easy than it seemed. The writer was steadfast against it and both Theodore and Walt would be needed to get the film made. That film would go down as Disney’s biggest movie till the 1970s was struggling to get off the ground. Like a kite without wind, the film production seemed doomed to fail before it began but nothing would keep Walt down and he would take the picture no matter what. The kite would fly, the movie would be made for Walt demanded it to be so.


 
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I'd imagine the purchase of Nintendo turned a few heads in the States, and made some heads roll in Japan. Nevertheless, I look forward to seeing this come to fruition.

On the flipside, seeing the Super Pets/Superman Hour be so successful for Disney is sweet.

On an even better note, a Disney movie being the first time two men kissed onscreen is quite an achievement, especially since it came out in Walt's era.

However, I do feel sad that Uncle Walt isn't that enthusiastic about changing how animation is created, given his abhorrent hatred for the Xerox method. Maybe if he saw what it could do for Marceline Animation, he could change his mind. But I digress.

One more thing to note is that my first timeline on this website had its POD come about by having Disney bring Nintendo's cards to the States at Disneyland. Now, even though that timeline is not around anymore, it makes me happy to see that I'm not alone in seeing that happen.
 
I'd imagine the purchase of Nintendo turned a few heads in the States, and made some heads roll in Japan. Nevertheless, I look forward to seeing this come to fruition.

On the flipside, seeing the Super Pets/Superman Hour be so successful for Disney is sweet.

On an even better note, a Disney movie being the first time two men kissed onscreen is quite an achievement, especially since it came out in Walt's era.

However, I do feel sad that Uncle Walt isn't that enthusiastic about changing how animation is created, given his abhorrent hatred for the Xerox method. Maybe if he saw what it could do for Marceline Animation, he could change his mind. But I digress.

One more thing to note is that my first timeline on this website had its POD come about by having Disney bring Nintendo's cards to the States at Disneyland. Now, even though that timeline is not around anymore, it makes me happy to see that I'm not alone in seeing that happen.
Its a shame your Timeline is not around anymore would of loved to read it. The Superman success is only the start, wait till we hit the live action movies.
On a sadder note. Walt is ageing and though he's all about innovation still. The world's fair and Disney world are coming, we have begun now to lay the seeds for his exit.
Walt's going to appreciate that movie even more me thinks when the truth comes out about George Disney Any chapter now and that in itself will be a whole other thing to deal with. Always nice to see more achievement in that department earlier on.
Also in our quest to save as many as we can. Buddy Holly has joined the list of those who have so far escaped death.
 
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