Part II Next year or in 10/20 years Real time

  • Yes: Next year

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • No: 10/20 years in the future

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Other Choice: Leave a comment.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12
  • Poll closed .
After thinking about how to do this. The main chapters will include important films and key information about production. The sub chapters will cover the whole casting, production and plots. The listing of movies is nearly completed and since its not to warm here today. You will get at least one chapter today.
 
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Chapter Seventeen: Going in all Directions


Chapter Seventeen: Going in all Directions

As the 1950s bled on. CBS found that some of the Disney shows were beginning to lose their shine. Well, The Briar Patch and the Adventures of Merlin the Magician still burned strongly. The Oswald and Mickey Revue had begun to burn out while Triple Trouble had failed to grab the attention of the fans. Donald duck in Europe had also come to a natural end. CBS wanted two hours of new content from Marceline Animation for their whole new children’s line up which had grown ever more popular. To this end, the time to craft new TV shows had become to pass once more. Yet Marceline Animation was now much more experienced than they were before allowing them to craft shows which would be immensely more popular. They were able to take lessons learned from past shows in order to implement more creative stories.

These would include The Adventures in Disneylandia. This show would follow a pair of siblings who each Episode enter a different part of Disneylandia and meet different characters such as snow white and Cinderella. the show was the first effort in media form to connect the different stories in one universe. As more animated films, the range of characters the show could use expanded. The second show created would be Summer of Invention. The show followed two twin brothers who would build marvellous contraptions each Episode to deal with summer boredom all while their sister attempted to catch them in the act, the brothers also had a pet rooster who was also a secret agent. Donald duck in Europe got a sequel series called Donald Duck In America which saw Donald duck take his nephews on a trip around all around North America.

Well, all these shows were popular they would be overshadowed by one of Disney’s most beloved shows. Mickey Mouse Clubs had dominated American childhoods for years but now it came to TV in The Mickey Mouse Club. The Mickey Mouse Club was hosted by Jimmie Dodd, a songwriter and the Head Mouseketeer, who provided leadership both on and off the screen. The opening theme was written by the show's primary adult host, Jimmie Dodd. The show’s popularity was not to be understated and a whole new generation was exposed to Mickey mouse and friends. Some historians have pointed out that due to the show’s successes the selling of Disney comics and merchandise began to climb again. The Minnie Mouse Hour followed on from the success of the Mickey Mouse Club. It followed the female Disney characters taking part in their own adventures across Toon Town USA.

Well, Disney cartoons began to dominate the small screen. Ub was pulling out the heavy hitters he believed could become the high of animation and win the war of animation that had been fought for years. The efforts were put into making the story tight with the animation looking clear. The first of these new waves of higher art animation was to be the Tales of Tintin. Nineteen-year-old Water Disney Junior had joined the studio as an understudy to UB and had visited Belgium with his father where they had secured the rights to the tinted novels. Soon the Tales of Tintin begun production in 1955. Artist Bob de Moor was brought over to the studios to perfect the artwork for the film adaptation which would adapt Tintin in America, Cigars of the Pharaoh, and The Broken Ear. Wolfgang Reitherman would direct, one of the most prolific members of the merry old folk of Disney. The film would star 18-year-old George Arthur Disney as Tintin. When it was released in 1956, the film was considered a major success and likened back to snow white once again. It won the Oscar for the best score as well as the best actor for George Arthur Disney at the 57 Oscars.

Ub Also wanted to try to copy the success of Fleischer Studios. To see if animating books could be a success. With Theodore working on two large projects, Ub negotiated with him to take over the production of Journey to the centre of the earth and turn it into an animated picture. It was a brave move as the studio had done yet adapted an adventure novel into an animated picture. Roald Dahl returned to work with the studio to write the screenplay on request of Walt who was seeking to work Dahl on other films and wanted him to work as a screenwriter. Rock Hudson was cast as the main character Sir Oliver Lindenbrook on behalf of George Arthur Disney. The pair had become quite close as friends despite the age gap. George himself took on the role of Alec McEwan. Wolfgang Reitherman once again returned to direct. Well, the film did not smash the box office as Tintin did. It brought another actor into what had become known as the Disney box.

The Disney box was a set of actors and actresses who more often than not started in a majority of Disney pictures be it voice or live-action. The term had begun with Judy Garland in the 1950s but by now had expanded to include the likes of Ronald Regan, Marylin Monroe, and James Dean. Rock Hudson was the latest to join this box though some media reported something was not quite right between Rock Hudson and George Arthur Disney. Considering their age difference. Disney was 19 when Journey to the centre of the earth was released while Hudson was thirty-two. Another actor George found himself close to was twenty-six-year-old James’s dean when the pair met on the set of Road to Hollywood that very same year. Walt and Lillian both refused to common on the rumours but rumours only grow.

Ub also ignored the rumours as he focused on the last animated feature of the 1950s. It would be a return to the fairy-tale movie that had begun the decade. That film would be sleeping beauty. The film was to be a groundbreaking film in terms of animation and the look of the movie. Like the other adaptations, the choice was made to keep the movie as loyal to its source material as possible. By the middle of 1957, director Wilfred Jackson had been selected to direct the film. Prince Philip became the first-named prince in the film with an effort given to make the character a more fleshed out person, the same effort was made with Aurora. Mary Costa was selected to play the princess, joining by now a select group of people called The Princess of Disney. The group was more unjust a title however as the company treated them with more favour including lifetime passes to Disneyland and first call if the character was to return. The casting for Princesses thus became even tighter than before as the weight of being a princess voice actress was a heavy one.

Sleeping beauty was made at a cost of six million. Making it at the time the most expensive film up to the point. Efforts to make beautiful animation, deeper characters, and adherence to the book however would make Sleeping beauty a major hit. As Disney had begun the decade with a smash hit, it now claimed victory in the animation war. Sleeping Beauty grossed approximately $8.3 million in theatre rentals. The film would win the Oscar for Best Scoring of a Musical Picture well also winning its first Grammy award Best Soundtrack Album, Original Cast – Motion Picture or Television. Ub had proven himself by the end of the 1950s to be just as good at making hits and historians have pointed out that Ub led Disney animated movies have done better at the box office than Walt’s.

As Ub dominated the box office and the newspapers and became the time’s person of the year in 1949. Theodore Disney set about to continue making his own mark on live-action films. Theodore would get two more live-action films in before the end of the 1950s as family issues pulled him away from the studio. The first of these would be the time machine. Walt had enjoyed the war of the worlds and wanted pal to return. A deal was struck up and pal was given the green light for any book he wanted to direct. He chose the time machine. Theodore would remain on as producer even though George pal was given more of a boss role.

Once again, the film was to be kept authentic to the book. This time around it meant casting an Englishman as the main character. The production crew settled with James Mason. The film prop was built by the Imagineers. Though their main purpose was to work upon Disney land they sometimes worked on the film. The prop today can be seen Inside the Disney Museum which is located fifteen minutes away from Disneyland and is run by the Disney and Iwerks family. The charm of time travel allowed the studio to request a higher budget which Walt agreed upon allowing some filming to be done within London itself. The film earned $1,610,000 in the United States and Canada and $1 million elsewhere, turning a profit of $245,000. It was not a critically liked film like a war of the world was before it but it is still considered a cult classic today.

Disappointed by the responses to The Time Machine. Theodore turned to create an entirely different film in 1957. He wanted to do Disney’s first live-action musical and to make it big and out there. He settled upon an idea to have two characters completely different compete for a role in a musical with their partners standing by them and Hijinks ensuing. Judy Garland and A recently recovered Marylin Monroe were cast as the main character. Marilyn was to play Jessica. A typical Hollywood dreamer. She was a sweet, flirty yet innocent girl hoping to make it big in Hollywood while Garland would play her unlikely competition Victoria. A leather jacket-wearing biker girl who's going to Hollywood to become a rock and roll singer. James’s dean would Play Monroe’s boyfriend while George Disney was cast as Garland’s.

Walter Lang was selected to direct the film after Theodore watched There's No Business-Like Show Business in order to understand live-action musicals. The film would be a clash of traditional music songs with rock and roll. Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller were brought onboard. The film also ended with the song There's No Business-Like Show Business with a cameo from Theodore and Walt himself. The film was a cortical success and would spawn a trilogy. It was considered by the critics the height of 1950s musicals. The film's budget was $3,223,000 but the earnings sat around $8,203,555. Disney had hit out the park and praise for the film was high though some pointed out the homosexual undertones were even higher than Carmilla. The film garnered an Oscar win for Garland and dean.

The end of the 1950s also brought a small partnership with a small Japanese company called Nintendo. The Company had contacted Walt Disney to incorporate his company's animated characters into the cards. Disney agreed and characters soon began to appear as Nintendo also developed a distribution system that allowed it to offer its products in toy stores. Yet the end of the 1950s would be dominated mostly by family news as shifts began to happen. Theodore Elias Disney and Marylin Monroe Finally married in the spring of 1956. Their first Child Peter James Disney was born a year later in 1957, there second Lillian May Disney was born in 1959.

Theodore was not the only one expanding the Disney Family. Diane Disney had gone on to Marry Don Iwerks in 1952, Don was the son of Ub, and through marriage, the families were now connected in more ways than one. Their First Child Elias David Disney was born in 1954 well their second pair of twins were born a year later in 55 Jessica Snow Disney and Martha Ruth Disney. Harry Roy Disney had no children yet but had gone on to Marry in 1959. He married Disney Animator Elizbeth Rogers. Water Disney Junior had no time for romance yet as his focus was work while George Arthur Disney only had rumours about his lifestyle which the family chose to ignore.

Yet tragedy would soon hit the family. Fifty-six-year-old Ruth Disney had been with the company since the very start working as a story writer. She had often worked with her brothers and was extremely close to Walt. She had retired from the business to work upon writing her own novels. Her first, The Curse of tomorrow released in 1958. Yet one day, well walking home from the studio’s Ruth was hit by a car. She survived but the damage had been done. On October 2nd, 1958, Ruth Disney passed away. The news hit the headlines and the studio was soon plunged into mourning. In one of the most circulated images of that year. The entire family and the merry old folk of Disney all gathered together at the funeral to mourn the loss. The 1960s would offer the company many changes to grow but Ruth was gone and she would soon not be the only one. The Ruth Disney Foundation today was founded in 1959 in her memory to provide free books to children around the country.


 
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Wow. Once again, I have a lot of stuff to say on this.

First off, earlier versions of Phineas and Ferb as well as the Disney Princess franchise? I don't think I expected either of those.

Second, giving The Mickey Mouse Club a spinoff centered around Minnie Mouse and the other Disney females is a great idea. And so is a Disneyland animated series, for that matter.

Third, I am amazed that Tintin did so well in Disney's hands.

Fourth, the revelations that Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks are now in-laws to an extent, in addition to Marilyn Monroe being an honorary member of the real Disney family, just makes me swoon inside.

Fifth, it slightly broke my heart to see Ruth Disney pass away. But let me refer to the previous comment I have on this chapter as a slight net gain. And I do so mean slight!
 
Wow. Once again, I have a lot of stuff to say on this.

First off, earlier versions of Phineas and Ferb as well as the Disney Princess franchise? I don't think I expected either of those.

Second, giving The Mickey Mouse Club a spinoff centered around Minnie Mouse and the other Disney females is a great idea. And so is a Disneyland animated series, for that matter.

Third, I am amazed that Tintin did so well in Disney's hands.

Fourth, the revelations that Walt Disney and Ub Iwerks are now in-laws to an extent, in addition to Marilyn Monroe being an honorary member of the real Disney family, just makes me swoon inside.

Fifth, it slightly broke my heart to see Ruth Disney pass away. But let me refer to the previous comment I have on this chapter as a slight net gain. And I do so mean slight!
Nice to see you noticed the earlier Phineas and Ferb. Also yes, an earlier attempt to unite the Disney princess. The Main resson for this is to butterfly away the 3 Descendants movies which were more your typical teen Disney movie instead of using the characters they had in a better story.
The Family Is expanding and Joining together. Ruth will always be remembered. Walt Gets statues with Oswald, Ub with Mickey, Ruth will likely get one with Minnie. Also on the note of family. I wonder if you can suspect what's wrong with George Disney considering it includes somehow both Rock Hudson and James Dean.
 
Nice to see you noticed the earlier Phineas and Ferb. Also yes, an earlier attempt to unite the Disney princess. The Main resson for this is to butterfly away the 3 Descendants movies which were more your typical teen Disney movie instead of using the characters they had in a better story.
The Family Is expanding and Joining together. Ruth will always be remembered. Walt Gets statues with Oswald, Ub with Mickey, Ruth will likely get one with Minnie. Also on the note of family. I wonder if you can suspect what's wrong with George Disney considering it includes somehow both Rock Hudson and James Dean.
At first, I thought it was a TTL-exclusive cartoon. That is, until it took a closer look at it. As soon as I saw the bit about the "secret agent rooster", I knew you essentially ISOTed the plot of P&F.

I can see the connections between Ruth and Minnie, while more recognition for Ub as the creator of Mickey is always good.

I guess George Disney is a drug addict as of recent?
 
At first, I thought it was a TTL-exclusive cartoon. That is, until it took a closer look at it. As soon as I saw the bit about the "secret agent rooster", I knew you essentially ISOTed the plot of P&F.

I can see the connections between Ruth and Minnie, while more recognition for Ub as the creator of Mickey is always good.

I guess George Disney is a drug addict as of recent?
I may Transport other series back though time, one's that could work anyway. Take that's so raven for example. That could easily be a 60s show.
Again Making sure everyone is recognised is the goal. Hence why the timeline is no longer the life and time's of Walt Disney.
Drugs was not something I did think about when creating George Disney though it kind of makes sense with all the pressure. We will see more from him in the 60s. It is the decade that began the sexual revolution after all. He can have a happy ending or a sad ending tbf.
 
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Anyone have a preference for an actor to play bond. Its 1955. The Man I have as top contender ATM is Richard Burton. Anyone got another they prefer? Also Disney and FS are likely going to get in a somewhat more aggressive fight come 1973 and FS Westworld. If anyone wants to add to that idea, feel free to let me know. And Finally, Should FS expand and buy things like Disney has. Contenders for that could be anything, the main one being Hasbro.
 
Anyone have a preference for an actor to play bond. Its 1955. The Man I have as top contender ATM is Richard Burton. Anyone got another they prefer? Also Disney and FS are likely going to get in a somewhat more aggressive fight come 1973 and FS Westworld. If anyone wants to add to that idea, feel free to let me know. And Finally, Should FS expand and buy things like Disney has. Contenders for that could be anything, the main one being Hasbro.
I don't have a preference for James Bond, because I know jack squat about the franchise.

I think the name "Fleischer Studios" is becoming old hat, especially if we're closely approaching the 70's. Might I suggest changing their name to Famous Studios in 1971? That way, the Fleischer family name can have a longer lifespan than its shoddy end IOTL.

I think FS should expand and purchase companies. And while Hasbro is a surprising idea, I think a company like Sega or McDonald's would be fitting as well. The former because you said you'd be making plans for Disney to buy both Nintendo and Capcom, or at least enter an exclusive partnership with them. The latter because the one food-based thing better than a chips factory is a restaurant.
 
I don't have a preference for James Bond, because I know jack squat about the franchise.

I think the name "Fleischer Studios" is becoming old hat, especially if we're closely approaching the 70's. Might I suggest changing their name to Famous Studios in 1971? That way, the Fleischer family name can have a longer lifespan than its shoddy end IOTL.

I think FS should expand and purchase companies. And while Hasbro is a surprising idea, I think a company like Sega or McDonald's would be fitting as well. The former because you said you'd be making plans for Disney to buy both Nintendo and Capcom, or at least enter an exclusive partnership with them. The latter because the one food-based thing better than a chips factory is a restaurant.
A re-name sounds like a good idea. Calling themselves Famous studios opens themselves up for attacks by Disney as well because that name is a bit odd considering there not the only one. God knows what Paramount Pictures was thinking when they named it that. Though the name changing makes sense, need something to roll of the tounge like Disney does.

I say Hasbro because there's a lot of properties they do own. FS to buy EA and save us all from them well also partnering with Sega to stop there slight decline. Never thought about someone buying McDonald's could work, one way to one up Disney. Sure Someone here will have a word on bond, chapter is being written tomorrow.
 
Regarding Bond...why exactly does this need to change? Keep Connery in the role for now. He was the best Bond of them all.

Also, since you've apparently moved Phineas and Ferb back in time: I would advise against doing this to too many shows, in order to avoid a situation where we reach the point these shows would have premiered in our world and we don't have anything to replace them.
 
Regarding Bond...why exactly does this need to change? Keep Connery in the role for now. He was the best Bond of them all.

Also, since you've apparently moved Phineas and Ferb back in time: I would advise against doing this to too many shows, in order to avoid a situation where we reach the point these shows would have premiered in our world and we don't have anything to replace them.
I see your point with the Latter One. If we get there (still no end date) decided. we will end up with a whole other problem of haveing not enouth shows.
As Much as I love Connery. His first credited role was 1957 and this Film is 1955. Now its not a stretch to say they went and found Connery but casting someone else as bond well that's preferable. The good news is, the first actor wont be bond forever meaning Connery can still come along around 1963 to take over preserving his role.
 
On top of the bond thing. FS renames dream works studios, we can butterfly away the later studios name. And if you wanted to go out there out there and copy something Disney did. Have FS buy universal studios in the 70s and 80s, then have Universal studios theme parks become Dream work parks instead. Competition for Disney in the theme park market and taking out a former ally to the studio.
 
On top of the bond thing. FS renames dream works studios, we can butterfly away the later studios name. And if you wanted to go out there out there and copy something Disney did. Have FS buy universal studios in the 70s and 80s, then have Universal studios theme parks become Dream work parks instead. Competition for Disney in the theme park market and taking out a former ally to the studio.
Considering your plans for Fleischer, calling it DreamWorks sounds better in the long run. Heck, with the future goals you have for FS/DreamWorks, it feels very reasonable.
 
Considering your plans for Fleischer, calling it DreamWorks sounds better in the long run. Heck, with the future goals you have for FS/DreamWorks, it feels very reasonable.
Thoughts on them buying universal and going global with DreamWorks theme parks. It may be the most out there idea yet but there set to become a global media company one way or another.
 
Thoughts on them buying universal and going global with DreamWorks theme parks. It may be the most out there idea yet but there set to become a global media company one way or another.
Why not? Heck, I wouldn't put it past them to purchase something like, say, Jay Ward Productions to fortify their television properties.
 
Why not? Heck, I wouldn't put it past them to purchase something like, say, Jay Ward Productions to fortify their television properties.
Well this timeline started with a focus on Walt but has shifted dramatically. There's quite a few studios to look into for both companies. Mirage Studios, Jay ward productions and Nickelodeon. Don't want to expand the companies to much but universal is for certain.
 
Side Chapter two: The 1950s for Fleischer Studios

Side Chapter two: The 1950s for Fleischer Studios

Fleischer Studios had always been viewed as that little studio. The One that always sat below Disney. Depside successes throughout the 1940s, the company could not escape that image. It was one that changed up the company as the 1950s arrived. Relations between the brothers had begun to deteriorate around 1938, which was aggravated further by Dave's insistence on being more like Disney. He wanted the studio to thrive and not just get by. The brothers put aside their differences for most of the 1940s but by 1950 the hostility between the pair grew too high and Dave Fleischer resigned from Fleischer Studios, leaving max alone yet as the 1950s soon came to prove. The studio would emerge from the shadow of Disney to be a strong competitor on its own. Max Fleischer could not do this alone and he struck out to find new talent to lead the animation department as he moved onto business full time.

Max could not have known then what his call would bring but it caught the attention of two animators. Separately William Debney "Bill" Hanna and Seph Roland "Joe" Barbera, were two animators for MGM studios who were insanely talented at what they did. They met while working in Rudolf Ising's unit at MGM's animation division. It was here that the two solidified a partnership that would last for six decades and would end up with them in charge of one of Americas’ largest film companies. Their first cartoon together, the Oscar-nominated Puss Gets the Boot, featuring a cat named Jasper and an unnamed mouse, was released in 1940 and served as the first entry in the long-running theatrical short subject series Tom and Jerry. The Pair’s rise to further fame was pushed higher by Dave Fleischer’s choice to quit.

The pair had no ill will against working at MGM's animation division but they did not have complete creative control. Hanna supervised the animation, while Barbera did the stories and preproduction. Seven of the cartoons won the Oscar for Best Short Subject (Cartoons) between 1943 and 1948 but still, they were not rewarded for their efforts as the Oscars went to Fred Quimby instead who had no input into the production of the shorts. This alienated the duo who soon happened across the advert from Fleischer Studios. Finding the advert was an accident as Hanna only bought the paper that day due to missing a train. The pair quickly sought the job, a chance to be the people in charge and gain credit for their efforts. Max seeing the pair’s qualifications agreed and so as he moved into the business role Hanna and Barbera moved into control of the animation department.

The pair agreed to strike a balance between the more family-friendly movies and the adult-based productions. Despite not being completely free from upper management both Hanna and Barbera were let loose in the studios beginning the studio’s assent to a large power in Hollywood. Their first film would be a historic epic. That film would be Lawrence of Arabia based on the life of T. E. Lawrence and his 1926 book Seven Pillars of Wisdom. The newspapers questioned the choice of topic calling it an odd one as action and historical epics had not yet been proven to work on the big screen. It was not something Hanna nor Barbera had worked on either but they pushed on with the project nether less. Max also pledged his support to the film funnelling in money the studio had from other areas.

To add credibility to the new project, it was decided to make the film an all-star cast. Well, Disney had used big names before they had not gone all out on every cast member. Alec Guinness was cast as the title character. Guinness had previously played Lawrence in the play Ross and was considered the perfect voice for the character. With Guinness on board, the next snatch was that of Laurence Olivier. Guinness had appeared alongside Olivier in King Lear making the casting easier when Guinness was cast. The pair were also used for live-action references for the characters. the first time the studio used the practice. Claude Rains, Cary Grant, Maurice Ronet, and Edmond O'Brien rounded out the cast. The news reporters reported on the project’s cast and questioned the actors.

Everything was sunk into the project. Hanna and Barbera sunk their own money into it, well max sold his home and took loans to plunge money into the film. When questioned about the project years later both Hanna Barbera admitted that they were trying to define cartoons as much than just child-friendly films and knew all the risks they were taking to make the film as perfect as it could be. Some predicted the end of the studios and some even asked Disney for comments but the studio declined. Walt in private letters to ruth Disney admitted he was intrigued by the film and its attempts to redefine something. The studio’s income was close to hitting the red as production wrapped on the feature film. The cast was for the most part agreed in the belief the film would do well. Historical accuracy was balanced at 50/50 in order to keep excitement and action up.

The film was released in the United States on 16 December 1952, the first film for the studio in the 1950s and the first in the animation war for the studio. With the money sinking into the red, the film had to smash the box office. upon release, the film was both a huge critical and financial success. The studio’s income shot through the roof and further projects were greenlit. For the studio’s they had defined animation had two paths. The family friend movies of Disney and their more adult-oriented films. The film as a whole is widely considered a masterpiece of world cinema, it was also considered a defining moment in animation working on building upon the foundations that snow-white had established. Today is considered one of the greatest films ever made. Hana and Barbera were also finally jointly recognized for their work.

The film’s success saw the studio continue to make adult-based animation adaptations throughout the 1950s, many claiming victory over their Disney counterparts. 1954 saw the release of John Steinbeck’s of mice and men. The film saw John Wayne as George and Audie Murphy Lenny. The film was praised for its faithfulness to the book and is considered as some of the first representations for the disabled in Hollywood. One year later in 1955, Sherlock Holmes II released a sequel to the studio's last film. This film would begin a series of Sherlock Holmes films that would continue onto the 60s and 70s. The third film was released in 1958. The studio would also release a lesser liked Jungle book adaptation in 1957, there first of three attempts on the film. This film was considered a lesser success than that of mice and men and sherlock homes.

Adult films would not be their only properties, however. In 1955 the studio released Betty Boop and the pea and in 1957 they released Return of Popeye. These films were released as an effort by Hana and Barbera were both seeking to update both characters and bring them up to the new standards the studio help. Both pop eye and Betty Boop would be key figures in Hana and Barbera’s strategy going forward alongside their original characters they would be a common feature for the growing studio. Yet it would be none of these animated films adult or family friend that would truly claim the company’s place right alongside Disney. Two films that would go on to become franchises would dominant the company.

The first was a character from Toho is a film, theatre production, and distribution company located within Japan. In 1954 the studio released Godzilla. Godzilla was a popular film in Japan and the local Asian land. It was the first Japanese film to become a big hit in the republic of China. The film had not yet breached the American market due to Hollywood dominance. Yet the studio was interested in the film when nobody else was. They wanted to preserve the film and only dub it, to try to see if A Japanese film could do well in America. In 1955, Max Fleischer entered with Toho to bring Godzilla films to American audiences with the goal of persevering as much as they could. The Film Godzilla was theatrically released in the United States on April 27, 1956, and brought Godzilla to international stardom. The film’s critical and box office success in America aided Toho and increased tourism to a rebuilding Japan which sought to capitalize on the success of Godzilla. One sequel would follow in the 1950s, in 1958 titled Godzilla Raids Again. It was another hit.

Well Godzilla was a live-action success it was not made by the studios and they sought to make their own live-action movie. The search for something to adapt was quite a slow progress yet in 1953 they found a book by a British writer that intrigued them. The book titled casino royale was a popular book in Britain and was considered for adaptation. After meetings with the writer, an agreement was finally made in 1954 and the rights were sold to the studio for six thousand dollars. The writer would be included in the production of the film which was slated for a 1956 release. Henry Levin was brought on as director well Monty Norman who would become known for the bond theme was brought on as a music producer.

The film was to keep as close to the book as possible with Fleming working alongside the crew. The only disagreement came with the actual casting of the main character. Well Fleming wanted David Niven for the lead role the cast instead went for Richard burton who agreed and so the film was a go. The media this time around was more supportive after the success of prior films. The studios beat Disney to the mass marketing idea as they made licensing deals revolving around the character's tastes. Creating merchandising tie-ins with drink, tobacco, men's clothing, and car companies. The campaign also focused on Ian Fleming's name due to the minor success of the book. Walt took notice of this campaign and planned to use it himself at a later date.

The film had its worldwide premiere at the London Pavilion, on 5 October 1956. It beat Disney to a London Premier. Well, the film was not a critical success, it was a hit with the fans. The film made on a budget of a million dollars would go on to gross six million. It grossed $840,000 in just two weeks in the Uk. The film served as a basis for a franchise and things learned in this film would carry on over to the other sequels all based on books written by Fleming. Live and Let Die is released in 1957, Moonraker in 1958 and Diamonds Are Forever in 1959. Despite the films being insanely popular and Richard burton well-liked in the role, by the end of the 1950s, there were rumours about his exit. The studio had however won the animation war but the fight was far from over.

The 1950s had been a chance for both studios to find new footing, explore, and create new ways of crafting animation. President Truman and President Warren had both seen an American boom in the 1950s with a whole new wave of consumerism being born. The Election of 1960 saw a progressive democrat John F Kennedy beat the sitting president Warren heralding the start of a decade that would be different than the one that came before. The sexual revolution, the push for civil rights, the early LGBT movement would all ignite with Hollywood falling more and more under the spotlight for its actions. Both companies were now ready to ascend to the mass media empire’s they were set to become but to do so they would have to embrace the changing nature of Hollywood or fight against it. One way another, neither studio would be the same in 1970 as they once were in 1960. The most vital decade for both had finally arrived.
 
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I'm just going to say it. Your chapters are just so incredibly good! It's hard to find a bad one in the bushel.

Fleischer Studios making adaptations of Lawrence of Arabia and the James Bond franchise, revivals of Betty Boop and Popeye, and dubs of Godzilla movies from Japan? All while employing Hanna and Barbera with more respect than they did as MGM IOTL? With Bill and Joe working on some of the aforementioned projects from the studio in this decade? It seems to me that the split between Max and Dave didn't hinder much of the company's legacy as far as I know.

Is it possible to make a Hanna-Barbera television series which makes use of their interpretations of Betty Boop and Popeye, while also reviving one of Fleischer's other hits to fill in a slot? Sort of like The Huckleberry Hound Show and The Yogi Bear Show IOTL? I'm thinking that Bimbo and Koko the Clown are the most likely options for that third position, but I digress.

Can I give suggestions on how Walt, Ub, and Wolfgang can market their projects like how Max, Bill, and Joe handled the James Bond merch?
 
I'm just going to say it. Your chapters are just so incredibly good! It's hard to find a bad one in the bushel.

Fleischer Studios making adaptations of Lawrence of Arabia and the James Bond franchise, revivals of Betty Boop and Popeye, and dubs of Godzilla movies from Japan? All while employing Hanna and Barbera with more respect than they did as MGM IOTL? With Bill and Joe working on some of the aforementioned projects from the studio in this decade? It seems to me that the split between Max and Dave didn't hinder much of the company's legacy as far as I know.

Is it possible to make a Hanna-Barbera television series which makes use of their interpretations of Betty Boop and Popeye, while also reviving one of Fleischer's other hits to fill in a slot? Sort of like The Huckleberry Hound Show and The Yogi Bear Show IOTL? I'm thinking that Bimbo and Koko the Clown are the most likely options for that third position, but I digress.

Can I give suggestions on how Walt, Ub, and Wolfgang can market their projects like how Max, Bill, and Joe handled the James Bond merch?
Pleese fire away with your suggestions. I think Koko the clown is the most likely, Idk when the word bimbo became the word we use it as today but I cant see it changing. Easier to go with the clown.
The Godzilla thing happened because its my personal belief that Hollywood rearly needs to respect other culture's more when it comes to movies. The best recent zombie movie is Korean. Starting doing it in the 50s beguns to breed that respect over a period of years.
Hanna and Barbera have a interesting future from animators to Hollywood legends to creators of some of the biggest cartoons in the 60s. Then there is max dying in 1972. Someone needs to take over the studio and re-name it.
 
Please fire away with your suggestions. I think Koko the clown is the most likely, Idk when the word bimbo became the word we use it as today but I cant see it changing. Easier to go with the clown.
The Godzilla thing happened because its my personal belief that Hollywood really needs to respect other culture's more when it comes to movies. The best recent zombie movie is Korean. Starting doing it in the 50s begins to breed that respect over a period of years.
Hanna and Barbera have a interesting future from animators to Hollywood legends to creators of some of the biggest cartoons in the 60s. Then there is max dying in 1972. Someone needs to take over the studio and re-name it.
Yeah, Koko is the best pick for that, honestly speaking.

On that regard, could we see Warner Bros. become the first company to dub anime? I mean, yes, they did dub anime here and there during their Seven Arts days, but if we're going to have a constant stream of oneupmanship, why not have WB get in touch with Osamu Tezuka or Fujiko F. Fujio?

Why not have Hanna and Barbera run the studio with some changes? Fleischer Studios can be renamed as DreamWorks Pictures, Hanna-Barbera Productions can be retitled as DreamWorks Television, and when the gaming industry comes to the States, the combined elements of DreamWorks would be perfect for numerous genres of gaming history.

Finally, I was thinking we could have porcelain figures of the Disney characters for the bigger spenders in the world, as well as some sort of annual sweepstakes contest during the summer months where one Saturday in July is taken over by Walt Disney Television and Marceline Animation on CBS's televised lineup from 7 A.M. to 8 in the evening. I'm talking like a variety of animated shows and movies from the past few years, ranging from The Oswald and Mickey Revue to Walt Disney Presents to Fantasia. If it's animated from the Walt Disney Company for theaters or TV, chances are that it will be part of the annual takeover/telethon/sweepstakes.
Sort of like this...

The grand prize would be a family pack of tickets to Disneyland, but there are also lesser prizes like free Disney movies for a year from your local theaterhouse, or a Davy Crockett hat. That is, if Disney still makes the Davy Crockett series.

Oh, and one more thing, the takeover sweepstakes would be capped off by a special 90-minute episode of WDP that gives you sneak peeks of what's going to happen on television from good old Uncle Walt. Basically combining the video I just sent with From All of Us to All of You and the classic Saturday Morning preview specials from the OTL 80s and 90s.

What do you think of all this?
 
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