Part II Next year or in 10/20 years Real time

  • Yes: Next year

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • No: 10/20 years in the future

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Other Choice: Leave a comment.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12
  • Poll closed .
Any other films you would like to see before I go of to write Disneyland's entrance.
I have an idea for something in 1956-1957: a comedy starring Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe since their chemistry in Carmilla works so well; a "rock and roll" take on the "Road to..." films. Marilyn plays her typical archetype - a sweet, flirty yet innocent girl hoping to make it big in Hollywood, and Garland plays her unlikely companion, a leather jacket-wearing biker girl who's going to Hollywood to become a rock and roll singer. Hilarity ensues, naturally, as they get into one comedic scrape after another.
 
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I have an idea for something in 1956-1957: a comedy starring Judy Garland and Marilyn Monroe since their chemistry in Carmilla works so well; a "rock and roll" take on the "Road to..." films. Marilyn plays her typical archetype - a sweet, flirty yet innocent girl hoping to make it big in Hollywood, and Garland plays her unlikely companion, a leather jacket-wearing biker girl who's going to Hollywood to become a rock and roll singer. Hilarity ensues, naturally, as they get into one comedic scrape after another.
I will take one portal to the place this movie exists pleese. Considering there both great actresses and singers for that matter.
 
Heck, maybe Disney could hire Leiber and Stoller (who were the go-to rock and roll songwriters during the 50s) to write the music?
Road to hollywood, Road to Broadway, and Road to Vegas. A trilogy if you will. They could even Thelma and Louise it in the end. Also I can see the homosexual nature of the trilogy the further it goes along and the closer to the 60s it becomes. Go all the way and hire Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller like you suggest.

 
Road to hollywood, Road to Broadway, and Road to Vegas. A trilogy if you will. They could even Thelma and Louise it in the end. Also I can see the homosexual nature of the trilogy the further it goes along and the closer to the 60s it becomes. Go all the way and hire Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller like you suggest.
Love it, love it, love it. Perhaps (judging by the titles) the duo's goals are to get their aspirations bigger...and cause as much mayhem as possible doing it.
 
I was also thinking each film has a different musical style:

Road to Hollywood: Rock and Roll.

Road to Broadway: traditional pop and showtunes.

Road to Vegas: jazz and swing.
Now this is gonna for sure keep Judy Garland and Monroe alive much longer. Gonna go with this idea, be interesting to see what they do as they age though.
 
Chapter Sixteen: Walt’s Biggest Gamble


Chapter Sixteen: Walt’s Biggest Gamble

The concept for Disney land had begun long before conception work on the park had even begun. With children, Walt always had to find a way to entertain his children alongside working and so he took them to Griffith Park in Los Angeles. It was here that while watching his wife and youngest child on the merry-go-around Walt got hit with the idea. A place where both adults and children could come together and have fun together. This dream however was simply nothing but a dream. Walt told nobody and the idea remained dormant. The earliest mention of the park however was 1948 with a memo to studio production designer Dick Kelsey on August 31, 1948, where it was referred to as a "Mickey Mouse Park. It was not the idea that would become Disneyland but it was the start. The idea would not remain dormant for very long, however.

As the popularity of the studio began to rise further than it had before, Walt often found himself opening letters from the fans instead of letting his secretary do it. It was here Walt found a common theme. People wanted to come to the studios, to see how things were done. To see how the magic, they created was forged. Yet Walt knew that the functional movie studio had little to offer to fans and would be more than a disappointment. Disappointing fans was the one thing Walt feared more than anything. The idea of a park however could easily negate the problems of studio tours. A park where people could see magic. It was with these letters that Walt began to foster various ideas about building a site near the Burbank studios for tourists to visit. It would be simple but effective.

Yet like everything including Walt Disney. The ideas could not remain simple for very long and soon his ideas evolved to a small play park with a boat ride and other themed areas. The ideas that would become Disneyland soon began to form inside Walt's mind. The initial park concept, the Mickey Mouse Park, was originally planned for an eight-acre plot to the south of the studio. Besides Greenfield Village and the Chicago Railroad Fair, Disney was also inspired by Tivoli Gardens in Denmark, Knott's Berry Farm, Colonial Williamsburg, the Century of Progress in Chicago, and the New York's World Fair of 1939. Yet the park did not inspire confidence in everyone just like his attempts to make snow white he was met with resistance.

The people Walt needed to win over stood against the idea. This included both bankers and investors. People within the company itself also stood strongly opposed to the idea. They had just returned back to strength now Walt wanted to waste their hard money on insane ideas. Ub also stood opposed while his son Theodore kept out of the way of the project which told Walt all he needed to know. His brother Roy thought that a "fanciful, expensive amusement park would lead to financial ruin. Roy was right that Walt lacked the real estate and commercial construction experience to bring this kind of project to life. But even with resistance Walt persisted.

He had proved everyone wrong before with snow white and he believed In his own ideas. Walt began to seek the money himself, the money from Cinderella being a massive help alongside the live-action films still he sold vacation property and borrowed on his life insurance. With the money increasing, he soon assembled a team of the Studio's most talented staff members and gave them the task to develop his broad ideas and create, with the help of commercial contractors, a rough construction timetable. Disneyland was now more than just a pipe dream as Walt founded Walt Disney Enterprises (WED) to deal with the construction of the massive project.

WED would be the precursor of today's Walt Disney Imagineering. A key factor in all of the parks. People still believed Walt was crazy and that like his other ideas it would soon pass on but Walt proved to them that this was more than just a fluke. He hired the Stanford Research Institute to examine the economic prospects of developing Disneyland and to scout a Southern California location for a place to locate Disney land. Walt specified in documents that were not revealed too much later, he was aiming for enough land to build at least three parks. One now and two in the future. He wanted to leave himself open for expansion in the future in case Disneyland was a success. Weather conditions, urban density, location to contractors were also all considered in choosing the location.

Soon the land was found. 38 miles south of Burbank in the city of Anaheim. He soon purchased the land which was back-to-back orange groves and walnut trees. It was also located next to the new Santa Ana freeway and Harbour Boulevard meaning that it was just 30 minutes away from downtown Los Angeles. Walt knew he needed more funding for the grand park however and turned to CBS in the hope they would help. Owing to the fact Walt's cartoons were a smash hit on tv. CBS was more than happy to help as long as they got a tv show out of it. that show would be One Hour in Wonderland which air alongside the construction of Disneyland.

Soon the first inkling of what Disneyland would look like came to be as Walt tracked down an artist friend called Herb Ryman. Together they would work closely to draw a detailed rendering of what Disneyland would look like. Over a weekend the pair talked about Walt's vision for Disneyland. Walt was so impressed by the drawings he went on to hire Ryman and he would be instructed to help with construction on the park itself. With $500.000 upfront and a guarantee of $4,5 million in loans from CBS, the reality of Disneyland's existence came ever closer. Roy, Theodore, and Ub still all believed Walt was crazy. In April of 1954, just 90 days before construction was to begin on Disneyland, Walt brought retired Admiral Joe Fowler on board to supervise the project. It was an odd choice but Walt believed he could do it after all he had once run the busy San Francisco Navy Yard. Construction on Disneyland finally began on July 16, 1954.

Construction on the park went day and night to build the lands of the park which consisted of Main Street, U.S.A., Adventureland, Frontierland, Fantasyland, Tomorrowland, and Toontown USA. Walt visited the site several times a week to keep an eye on the construction works. Roy also visited the project both worried and curious about what the project was going to be. Progress went sporadically despite numerous obstacles and soon the former orange groves were gone and transformed completely into something the world had not yet seen. Then just as the construction had begun, it came to a close after a total investment of $ 17 million. The gates of Disneyland would be opened for its first guests on Sunday, July 17, 1955. Anticipation was high.

The opening day was a semi-disaster. 28,000 people attended the event, only about half of those were invitees, the rest having purchased counterfeit tickets, or even sneaked into the park by climbing over the fence however opening day did include the dedication of the park and CBS aired the opening live. There were some problems as guests did trip over wires and trees went without water however the park’s opening was considered a success overall with some problems. However, Traffic was delayed on the two-lane Harbour Boulevard. The Park however would not be a failure and would go on to be a massive success. Disney’s empire had a foundation, Disneyland was only the start. Now it had to expand, in more ways than one it would do that. But Disneyland would go down as the birth of modern theme parks.
 
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If anyone has any ideas for cartoons for CBS from Disney for the 1960s, now is the time. It will be the decade duck tales, Mary Poppins the show, Superman and The Jungle Cruise all get animated or live action/animated hybrid shows.
 
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