Cool!

Why not remove Mickey's name from it and call it "ToonTown Terrace"? Just pulling out a potential name. Besides, it's nice that more characters will get costumes.

YES! Give me that!
However, would it top this in any way?

I second this hope.
D23 is fine but Imagine an event where you could go see sneak peaks at Disney movies, park stuff, games, comics and books well also getting to meet actors/actresses/animators. D23 but grander, with no exclusive membership either you just pay like other cons. Also ToonTown Terrace works. Getting the opening of Disneyland done right is key though how they would of manged that considering it was the first park. I don't know quite yet.
 
Last edited:
D23 is fine but Imagine an event where you could go see sneak peaks at Disney movies, park stuff, games, comics and books well also getting to meet actors/actresses/animators. D23 but grander.
Give. This. To. Me. RIGHT! NOW!
Also ToonTown Terrace works. Getting the opening of Disneyland done right is key though how they would of manged that considering it was the first park. I don't know quite yet.
Thanks!
Honestly, I don't know how you can make the Disneyland opening right either. The best it can be is mediocre with room for improvement. Certainly better than their opening day IOTL, but still not as good as Walt and the gang would have hoped.
 
Give. This. To. Me. RIGHT! NOW!

Thanks!
Honestly, I don't know how you can make the Disneyland opening right either. The best it can be is mediocre with room for improvement. Certainly better than their opening day IOTL, but still not as good as Walt and the gang would have hoped.
The main problem with fixing Disneyland's opening is. Walt very much learned form it. Walt Disney world has underground tunnels because of Disneyland. So fixing it slightly is fine but to much and Disney world would suffer. Also Disney-con would likely appear in the 70s which means folks would get to meet walt himself. Its something I would want too so.
 
Another side note on a small thing: I would love to include artwork in this timeline but its unlikely to happen because my ability to craft things like that aren't the best. If anyone was wondering why there's no photos about.
 
First, are you implying that Alice in Wonderland (which, if I recall correctly, was the next Disney movie after Cinderella) will break the Hays Code? Do you plan on making that movie even MORE insane (not that that's a bad thing: it's probably my favorite of the "classic" Disney movies)?

As for television, since Disney got involved early they shouldn't have much competition...at least till the other studios show up. My guesses as to what THEIR debuts would be:
-HANNA-BARBERA likely still starts with Ruff and Reddy: unless I missed something their career has gone the same as in our world and so this wouldn't change.
-WARNER BROTHERS is obviously going to debut with the Bugs Bunny Show.
-FLEISCHER is where things get a little dicey: by this point in our world they were bankrupt. My best guess is something involving Popeye. Betty Boop is also a possibility, but given she was rather controversial I think they would save her for a little later.
 
First, are you implying that Alice in Wonderland (which, if I recall correctly, was the next Disney movie after Cinderella) will break the Hays Code? Do you plan on making that movie even MORE insane (not that that's a bad thing: it's probably my favorite of the "classic" Disney movies)?
Oh, please. Not right after I woke up!
As for television, since Disney got involved early they shouldn't have much competition...at least till the other studios show up. My guesses as to what THEIR debuts would be:
-HANNA-BARBERA likely still starts with Ruff and Reddy: unless I missed something their career has gone the same as in our world and so this wouldn't change.
-WARNER BROTHERS is obviously going to debut with the Bugs Bunny Show.
-FLEISCHER is where things get a little dicey: by this point in our world they were bankrupt. My best guess is something involving Popeye. Betty Boop is also a possibility, but given she was rather controversial I think they would save her for a little later.
Well, there is the matter of Jay Ward Productions, but I agree with your predictions on HB and WB.

As for Fleischer, your guesses are in the right places with Popeye being most likely and Betty Boop being considered.
On the other hand, why not have them essentially be what Terrytoons and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises were like IOTL and have their post-1951 shorts move to television? I mean, with their rivals at Disney producing multiple hits for television, why NOT turn themselves into a television studio? Heck, why not have them merge with Harvey Comics while we're at it, and let them still make comics based on Casper and Baby Huey and the like, while also gaining the comics rights to Popeye and Betty Boop and all the others?
 
First, are you implying that Alice in Wonderland (which, if I recall correctly, was the next Disney movie after Cinderella) will break the Hays Code? Do you plan on making that movie even MORE insane (not that that's a bad thing: it's probably my favorite of the "classic" Disney movies)?

As for television, since Disney got involved early they shouldn't have much competition...at least till the other studios show up. My guesses as to what THEIR debuts would be:
-HANNA-BARBERA likely still starts with Ruff and Reddy: unless I missed something their career has gone the same as in our world and so this wouldn't change.
-WARNER BROTHERS is obviously going to debut with the Bugs Bunny Show.
-FLEISCHER is where things get a little dicey: by this point in our world they were bankrupt. My best guess is something involving Popeye. Betty Boop is also a possibility, but given she was rather controversial I think they would save her for a little later.
Oh, please. Not right after I woke up!

Well, there is the matter of Jay Ward Productions, but I agree with your predictions on HB and WB.

As for Fleischer, your guesses are in the right places with Popeye being most likely and Betty Boop being considered.
On the other hand, why not have them essentially be what Terrytoons and DePatie-Freleng Enterprises were like IOTL and have their post-1951 shorts move to television? I mean, with their rivals at Disney producing multiple hits for television, why NOT turn themselves into a television studio? Heck, why not have them merge with Harvey Comics while we're at it, and let them still make comics based on Casper and Baby Huey and the like, while also gaining the comics rights to Popeye and Betty Boop and all the others?
Dont worry everyone. Alice wont be the one to break the hays code, eventhough it should probboly lean more into the wacky then it did. Carmilla will do that. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Carmilla
Let us not forget that Fleischer studios will end up claiming Hanna-Barbera sometime during the 1950s.
Harvey Comics is one thing Fleischer could buy/merge with so is Archie Comics. Though bringing shorts to tv is a sure-fire way to get things started.
 
Three chapters are coming today. Covering some pretty big stuff in certain places. Two requests for films will be completed and at long last we will see Disneyland.
 
Chapter Fourteen: Daring to Defy


Chapter Fourteen: Daring to Defy

Animation was the bread and butter of Disney. It had established the presence and made them extremely popular. It also led to the rise of an entire animation industry with Warner Brothers and Fleischer studios became large and profitable with their own animation. Yet as many expected, doing one thing was never enough for Walt Disney and he wanted more. It was all well and good for the studio if they could manage animation but was it enough. With Buena Vista Distribution now established, the studio could make what it wanted on its own terms and not rely on a deal to distribute its films. The studio had made live-action/animation hybrids before but now the studio was ready to claim its stake in live-action.

The first attempt would be a simple film-based Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson. It was a book Walt had read to his younger boys when they were children and had become enthralled by it. the first attempt at a live-action film would be a simple affair for the studio. Walt would stay on as producer due to it being their first major attempt and wanting to make sure the film was done right. Byron Haskin would direct the studio’s first attempt which would begin a long-term collaboration between the Disney studio and Haskin. Bobby Driscoll was cast as Jim Hawkins; Driscoll would soon become a mainstay of the Disney studios up till his death in the 1990s. Money was sunk into the project just like had been done with Cinderella to make sure the film was up to standard.

The film returned from its initial release around $4,100,000 with $2,100,000 being generated in the United States and Canada. Reviews from critics were mostly positive. Thomas M. Pryor of The New York Times called the film "a grand and glorious entertainment" that "captures the true spirit of the novel. Yet Walt was unhappy with the film. To him it seemed like the studio had become stuck in an unbreakable mold and that people only saw them as a children’s studio. It was not an image Walt wanted. He wanted to break out the mold and do something that would truly shape their image. To do this Walt decided he would do something shocking which would put him in violation of the hays code. The hays code hung over Hollywood like a dark cloud and was not dissipating.

The Production Code spelled out what was acceptable and unacceptable content for motion pictures produced for a public audience in the United States. Many feared what would happen if they dared to even break the code and so remained within its parameters. Such things as Sympathy for criminals, the use of drugs, White slavery, and Ridicule became almost unseen within Hollywood. Yet Disney had already defied the normality once when he portrayed African American’s in a good light. Being an environment with African American’s and women shifted Walt's views further, one’s that had already been shaped by his father.

Walt had been a supporter of the republican party until the 1940s when he switched his allegiance to the democratic party. He had he became a generous Donator to Harry Truman in 1948 and 1952. In 1946, he became a founding member of the Motion Picture Alliance for the Expansion of American Ideals. The Alliance was progressive in nature and stood firmly against the hays code. Walt was not alone in standing against the hays code come the 1950s. In a strange first, Max Fleischer stood alongside Walt calling the hays code a shackle on the freedom of artistic expression. The newspapers had a field day. Anti-Hays Code Stance Brings Rivals together. With his views on the hays code known, Walt moved to make a picture that would shatter its control over Hollywood.

The first indication that this film was coming was the establishment of Elias pictures. Named after his father, the new production company would work within the Disney studios and would focus on making more adult productions that were not so family-friendly. Roy was completely petrified that the studio would be burnt to the ground if they continued but the mood in Hollywood was shifting against the hays code and with overseas films threatening to overtake them due to their content. Walt pushed on. He searched high and low for a story that he could adapt and settled on a vampire novel from 1872 called Carmilla. The film was known for its homosexual undertones even if the book never acknowledged it. it had been adapted before but now Walt wanted to take it all the way and announced the project in pure defiance of the hays code.

Well, the media erupted again due to Walt's actions he pushed ahead with the film. African American screenwriter Clarence Muse was brought on board to write the script after working with him on Brer Rabbit Adventures. Walt had struck up a friendship and decided he wanted to work with him again. The mere hiring of an African American screenwriter was enough for people to call for boycotts of the film. Yet Walt pushed on and became the producer of the film himself, making sure nothing was taken out or removed. Finding a director proved hard, but Byron Haskin agreed. He had enjoyed filming treasure island and tended to ignore the situation they found themselves in. Walt and some in Hollywood had realized soon that the hays code was not enforced so his next move was considered even more shocking.

Twenty-seven-year-old Marilyn Monroe was cast as the protagonist Laura. Monroe was a smaller actress who had appeared in Disney films in cameo’s here and there will also appearing in Donald duck in Europe. She had studied at the Disney school on property and had taken the stage name Marilyn Monroe to stand out. Yet at 27 Monroe was already making headlines for all the wrong reasons. She lived a life that many considered sinful and wrong. Even Roy protested the casting knowing full well that Monroe and Walt's son Theodore, had by now been hooking up. The news of these lesions leaked to the press and soon the newspapers began another range of attacks that Walt ignored.

The next character cast would Madame Perrodon who was to be played by Anna May Wong. Wong had become Frustrated by the stereotypical supporting roles she reluctantly played in Hollywood; Wong left for Europe in the late 1920s. In 1935, Wong was dealt the most severe disappointment of her career, when MGM refused to consider her for the leading role of the Chinese character O-Lan in the film version of Pearl S. Buck's The Good Earth. MGM instead cast Luise Rainer to play the leading role in yellowface. The Hays code was to blame and hearing of Carmilla had in desperation placed herself in the running for a role which Disney gladly accepted. Another voice against the hays code was a victory. The casting further added gasoline to the fire Walt was creating on purpose.

The rest of the casting was met with less media attention. British actors Vincent Price and Christopher Lee were cast as Baron Vordenburg and General Spielsdorf respectively. Well, Sidney Poitier was cast as Laura’s father. Some pointed out that Poiter was actually younger than Monroe but the casting stuck. The final and second most important role went to Judy Garland. She was not known for playing villains but wanting to break out of typecasting she was cast as Carmilla. The film’s homosexual undertones were slightly increased as filming began. Yet soon, far away a choice was being made that would shake the foundations of Hollywood.

The code had already become weakened in the late 1940s even if it seemed set in stone to some. Then came the supreme court. In 1953, in the case of Joseph Burstyn, Inc. v. Wilson, the Court unanimously overruled its 1915 decision) and held that motion pictures were entitled to First Amendment protection. Walt and Hollywood saw the writing on the wall. The government could not interject and censor them. The Hays code was in its dying days. Carmilla was still under constant pressure to change however yet Walt persisted right up until the opening day in late 1953. Carmilla was a smash hit. The film returned from its initial release with around $6,100,000. The film was outright banned in some southern cities because of the nature of the film and the cast was banned as well. Yet praise was high for the film. Its progressive nature was not unnoticed and it would see a shift in Hollywood.

At the Oscars the following year. The film proved just how powerful it was. It had twelve nominations and eight wins, matching two other films, Gone with the Wind (1939) and From Here to Eternity (1953), though those each had thirteen nominations. The film won best picture, best director, best actress (Judy Garland), best-supporting actor (Vincent Price), best supporting actress (anna may Wong), Best Music Score of a Dramatic or Comedy Picture, Best Story and Screenplay, and best art direction. Walt also won Best Documentary Feature for The Vanishing Prairie. The film was a critical and box office success and the hays code would soon slowly but surely vanish. Yet Walt and the other studios knew, with no regulation another hays code could come.

So, the heads of Hollywood’s largest studios. Walt And Roy Disney (Walt Disney Studios) Max and Dave Fleischer (Fleischer Studios), Jack L. Warner (Warner Brothers), Adolph Zukor (Paramount Pictures), John Cheever Cowdin (Universal Pictures), Louis B. Mayer (Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer), Mary Pickford (United Artists), Darryl F. Zanuck (Twentieth-century fox) and David Sarnoff (RKO Pictures) met in early 1954 and began long progress of establishing a code. Less restrictive than the hays code. That meeting and their actions would lead to the establishment of the Motion Picture Association and the Motion Picture Association Rating system. Rated G was Suggested for general audiences, Rated m was for mature audiences, Rated R was restricted for anyone under 16 and rated X was restricted for anyone under 18.

At first, the code was considered a fluke, and the hays code would win out. It would not. With Hollywood’s largest studios using the new rating system. Responsibility was passed from the studios on to the people. In a testament to their actions, the code is still used today. With parents having the reasonability over what children see not the studios. Yet through it, all Walt and his studios had not stoped and some of their most ambitious projects were already in motion. Most of the projects however would not be overseen by Walt. His focus has shifted onto project orange grove even as big films and the animation war continued.

 
Last edited:
The fact that we are getting three chapters today just tickles me pink and purple all over!

And of course, this most recent chapter still managed to become a good one. Like, if the MPAA ratings today are the same as the first announcement ITTL, then I'd be going to the theaters more often. Barring any natural disasters or global pandemics, that is.
 
The fact that we are getting three chapters today just tickles me pink and purple all over!

And of course, this most recent chapter still managed to become a good one. Like, if the MPAA ratings today are the same as the first announcement ITTL, then I'd be going to the theaters more often. Barring any natural disasters or global pandemics, that is.
The Rating system is the first one ever made in OTL. There will be no PG here. I do think parents should hold all responsibility to what a kid wants to watch and not blame the studios. None of the, problems that arise with films such as temple of doom. Parents will complain but wont be listened to here. There are no pandemics in the planning so you should be good in this universe going to the theatre.
 
Any last minute questions or additions to Disneyland will be needed shortly considering the chapter is being written around 6/7 BST. Its not the next chapter though. that will come shortly.
 
The Rating system is the first one ever made in OTL. There will be no PG here. I do think parents should hold all responsibility to what a kid wants to watch and not blame the studios. None of the, problems that arise with films such as temple of doom. Parents will complain but wont be listened to here. There are no pandemics in the planning so you should be good in this universe going to the theatre.
Responsible parents AND a healthier world? Count me in!
Any last minute questions or additions to Disneyland will be needed shortly considering the chapter is being written around 6/7 BST. Its not the next chapter though. that will come shortly.
Would CBS be the network to air the show of the same name? After all, they were wholeheartedly enthusiastic with peppering their schedules on Saturday Mornings and Primetime with Disney content both old and new.
 
Responsible parents AND a healthier world? Count me in!

Would CBS be the network to air the show of the same name? After all, they were wholeheartedly enthusiastic with peppering their schedules on Saturday Mornings and Primetime with Disney content both old and new.
Funny you should mention that last part. Its inside the next chapter. CBS will at some point be consumed by the Disney empire but for now they air all there cartoons. The next chapter, I think. is the longest so far. Includes a big choice they make for the future.
 
Chapter Fifteen: A whole New World


Chapter Fifteen: A whole New World

There were two clear things that came to Prominence for Disney in the 1950s. the first was that Walt could no longer be ever-present in film production be it live-action or animated. As the war of animation continued to wage and both warner brothers and Fleischer Studios now pumping out ever-higher quality films. To keep Walt in charge was no longer viable. Proof this came with 1952’s Chanticleer. The film was not the box office hit or success that Cinderella had before it, some critics considered the film unfinished and in places unimaginative. Walt’s attention was very much elsewhere, a new home heralded a larger garden and a miniature train. Roy, who remained the ever-steadfast head of the company knew that a change was very much needed and despite Walt's attempts to remain head of as many departments as he could. The time for that was over.

The studio was therefore reorganized after the failure of Chanticleer. After being in charge of the animation department since the 1920s, Walt finally stepped down. He also relinquished his leadership role over Elias Productions and instead moved into a new position of President of the company. Roy’s role would remain the same. Walt was not completely out of the picture and could work on motion pictures if so chose but now he was free to devote his time to the many many creative projects he had in store for the company. With Walt stepping down from his two roles however two new replacements were needed. And this was where the second clear thing came into view. The children of the company were heading for leadership roles one way or another. A case in point was 27-year-old, Theodore Elias Disney.

Theodore by now had become obsessed with live actions films as his father had done with animation. So, putting him in charge of Disney animation was a no-brainer but after proving himself during the production of Disney’s first two live-action films and after graduating the Disney School. Walt finally agreed to appoint his son, as head of Elias productions and the studio’s live-action branch. There were some accusations of favoritism by some of the staff but in time Theodore would more than prove capable of continuing on his father’s legacy and releasing some of Disney’s biggest live-action hits. The head of the animation studio was even clearer to Walt. Fifty-one-year-old Ub Iwerks had been with Walt since the 1910s and they had since then become extremely close friends. His successes in his own movies, elevated Ub to now take Walt's place. With the two secured in their leadership, they set about creating their own mark.

To test the waters on his ability to make films. Theodore decided to start out how his father had done by making what could be called a package film. He decided to adapt Gent from Bear Creek, a 1937 novel that collected the Western short stories by Robert E. Howard. He chose four stories from the book to be played out as shorts. Those consisted of Striped Shirts and Busted Hearts, Mountain Man, Guns of the Mountains, and A Gent from Bear Creek. Norman Foster was brought on to direct and James's dean was selected to star as Breckinridge Elkins. The film released in March of 1953, just one month before Walt's last film Carmilla. Well, A Gent from Bear Creek was no Carmilla it was in fact a smaller but well-liked film that would eventually spin off into a tv show with Ronald Reagan taking over the role from James dean.

With his first film out of the way. Theodore decided to go bigger with his next film and adapt the 1898 sci-fi novel The War of the Worlds. George Pal was interested in making a WOTW film at the same time and with interest and money from Disney to make the film. He agreed and joined as a co-producer. It was decided, due to the way Disney adapted books, that the film would be kept as close to the book as could be. That would make the film the first to shoot in London. Byron Haskin was once again brought on to direct, marking his third film for the company.

Ronald Regan who would go on to star in Disney’s western tv show was cast as The Narrator (Named George) while Theodore used favoritism to cast girlfriend Marylin Monroe as The Narrator’s Wife. Gene Barry was cast as The Artilleryman well English Actor Peter Cushing took on the role of The Curate. During the expensive production of the film, Roy came to realize that the son was very much like the father. Pal had originally planned for the final third of the film to be shot in the new 3D process to visually enhance the Martians' attack on Los Angeles. The plan was dropped prior to the actual production of the film due to budget constraints. Despite changes Pal wanted to make, Theodore insisted on keeping the book the same though there was an increased role for the Narrators wife, removing the brother entirely.

For the tri-pods, there was a great effort was made to avoid the stereotypical flying saucer look of UFOs. The Fighting machine machines were instead made to be sinister-looking machines shaped like manta rays with nimble legs. Three Martian war machine props were made out of copper for the film and when moved were doing in stop motion which took time but elevated the film and allowed the Martians to have their legs instead of floating flying machines. The film was a mammoth task to film. Well busy with other tasks Walt was present as an observer in the production of war of the worlds to see how his son could handle the weight of such a large project.

The film released in February of 1954. Walt, Theodore, Regan, and Pal all attended the premier and soon found out the verdict for Theodore’s first outing. The film was both a critical and box-office success. It accrued $2,000,000 in domestic rentals, making it the year's biggest science fiction film hit. Theodore had done what was asked of him and more. He secured his position as head of the department as the war of the worlds went on to win the Oscar for Special Effects. But even as the film finished, Theodore proved he was even more like his father as he moved straight onto the next project. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea. Another novel adaptation, the anticipation was high for Disney to bring the Novel to life.

Well, War of the world’s had indeed filmed some of its scenes in London. 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea would be the first film to have most of its scenes shot overseas. The film at filmed at various locations in The Bahamas and Jamaica, with the cave scenes filmed beneath what is now the Xtabi Resort on the cliffs of Negril. Over 500 men would work on the technical scenes in the film, making it one of the most crew-heavy productions the studio had worked on thus far. Walt and Roy got into a heated argument over the budget of the film however as with a production cost of $9 million, it was to be the film was the most expensive in Hollywood so far and presented a serious financial risk to the studio should it flop. Theodore was too much like his father for Roy’s taste. There was no reason to be worried however as the film went on to gross $8 million in North American distributor rentals alone, making it the third highest-grossing film of 1954.

Well, Theodore stormed the box office with live-action adaptions of sci-fi novels, UB turned to uncompleted projects the studio had. The first of those being Alice in Wonderland. Ub was more than aware of Alice in wonderland. Walt had made the studio read both books and they had also produced Laugh-O-Gram’s based upon the book. Yet the studio was not finished there and for a short time, Alice was considered to be their first-ever full-length animated feature. The film idea however would not die. Walt soon bought the film rights of Alice in Wonderland. He then hired storyboard artist Al Perkins and art director David S. Hall to develop the story and concept art for the film. Yet once again, the specter of world war two stopped production on a feature that would need just too much work.

Now Ub once again resurrected the film in 1952. Ub decided to lean in on the more out there and whimsical style of the book. He hired British author Aldous Huxley to the script well Mary Blair was drafted to produce the artwork. Ilene Woods who had missed out on Cinderella was cast as Alice and as a live-action reference. This was done early on in order to help the film’s production so concept art could closely match the story being crafted. Some of the writers working on the film would often see, many sequences that were present in Carroll's book drifted in and out of the story. However, Ub made it clear that all the scenes must be kept in as by now the studios were known for semi-faithful adaptations. Frank Churchill was assigned to compose songs working alongside the reels of the film to make sure the score was authentic to the story they were portraying. Sammy Fain was also brought on board.

Alice in Wonderland premiered at the Leicester Square Theatre in London on July 26, 1953. The film had a lukewarm reception. Some suggested the film was too lucid to follow where one newspaper reported that he believed the film was what would happen if you consumed drugs. Compared to the release of Fleischer Studios’ of mice and men (which was praised) the film was ranked lower with Fleischer taking the victory in this battle. Yet Ub was not out of the picture yet as he had two films in production. After the massive success of the loony toons being brought to film, it was time to adapt the wizard of oz after paying for the rights to all the films. Yet this was not to be just any wizard of oz. it would be Mickey and Friends in The Wizard of Oz. the film cast mickey as the scarecrow, Oswald as the tin man, Pluto as toto, Minnie as Dorothy, Donald as the cowardly lion, Pete as the wizard, and Maleficent as the wicked witch.

The film was no big hit but it was not a dud either. It released in December of 1953 and would once again beat, this time by Warner Brothers. Loony Toons: Wild West Bonanza. Yet the film would go on to become a cult hit. Often being shown on television and becoming one of the first home releases of the studio. It would start a trend for the company of interjecting mickey and friends into classic stories which would be popular yet not ground-breaking. The next big film for the studio and the hope for another hit was peter pan. Like Alice before it, Walt had expressed interest in doing an adaptation of Peter Pan as his second film following Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, yet could not make it live-action due to Paramount Pictures owning the copyright. The animation rights however were up in the air and a bidding war began. Disney did finally manage to outbid its rival for the rights to Peter pan. Its rival being Fleischer Studios.

By early 1939, a story reel had been completed, and by the following May, Disney had several animators in mind for the characters. it was decided there and then to remain faithful to the book and play despite different interpretations of the story being considered. The film’s production, like that of Alice and wonderland, was shelved due to world war two. Ub Resurrected the film again in 1952 and production soon began again. Jack Kinney was appointed director by UB. The first voice actor joined before the film’s production even began and that was Cary Grant as Captain hook. Bobby Driscoll who had already worked for Disney before secured the role of Peter pan. Wanting to play Fleischer Studios at their own game. The film was darker than most Disney films at the time. There were scenes involving Captain Hook being killed by the crocodile, the Darling family mourning over their lost children, and Pan and the children discovering the pirates' treasure loaded with booby traps.

Like the films before it, live-action actors were used for reference. It was to be the last time A Disney film would use the practice. Milt Kahl was appointed to animate captain hook something he had wanted to do since the film’s early production and which some suggested added more quality to the character as Khal was enjoying the role and the character. Frank Thomas was given peter pan and worked closely with other animators to make sure the character looked more childlike than the live-action references. Wolfgang Reitherman also helped the film along at the request of Ub. Eliot Daniel composed songs for the film. Staying as true to the book and play as they could they feared another failure like Alice in wonderland. Peter Pan was first released in theaters on February 5, 1954. The film was a much greater hit and scored another long-awaited victory for Disney in the animation wars. It went on to grossed $7 million in distributor rentals from the United States and Canada and was praised for its faithfulness.

Walt returned for the next film to be released in 1955. He had recently had ideas for a none human film and so UB and Walt would work together to produce lady and the tramp with Clyde Geronimi, Wilfred Jackson, and Hamilton Luske serving as the film’s directors. Early on in the film’s production, it was decided that to maintain a dog's perspective, meaning Darling and Jim's faces are rarely shown, similar to Tom's various owners in the Tom and Jerry cartoons. In a first for A Disney film, one person would voice more than one character. That was singer Peggy Lee not only voiced four characters but co-wrote six songs for the film. Well, Peter Pan was the last film to use humans as life references for cartoons. Lady and the tramp would be the last film to use the progress altogether. With animals brought into the studio to be studied. Lady and the tramp would also be the last film Ruth Disney would work upon. It would also be the last film Mary Blair would work upon as she would depart the studio after its production to become an illustrator for children’s books. Disney also decided to animate the film in CinemaScope making Lady and the Tramp the first animated feature filmed in the process.

Lady and the Tramp were released to theaters on June 22, 1955. The film once again received mediocre reviews. Yet the film caused a divide. Fans loved it and critics hated it. the film smashed the box office but failed to win any awards. To Walt it was a victory, he made the film for the people, not the critics, and was pleased with the film’s success. Yet well all these films came out over a period of five years after Walt stepped down. He was nothing but busy. In 1954, he and Roy established The Walt Disney Music Company. Yet it was not this that was important, it was what he was doing with television.

To fund his secret project Walt turned to CBS who were more than obliged after the success of his cartoons. They asked for a tv show however in return. The first was One Hour in Wonderland. The show contained teasers for Walt's park, as well as episodes representing life inside the project Walt was crafting. Each episode would contain a short cartoon as well about certain aspects. The show would be hosted by Walt and would begin airing in 1953, the show however would only remain under its original name for 3 years. As the secret project was revealed to the public the show was renamed Walt Disney Presents. The reason for this was simple. Walt became the host and would remain so in one of his longest potions. Yet as this all happened, the films released and TV shows were produced. Walt’s grandest and craziest idea was now ready to be crafted. Walt wanted a place people could visit his motion pictures. He wanted a Disneyland.
 
Last edited:
Quite a bit to unpack here, so apologies if this runs a little long.

CARMILLA: This was definitely a surprise. I imagined Disney might have gone into more adult films given enough time, but this was sooner than I expected. Also, points to Disney for getting a soon-to-be-huge star (Marilyn Monroe) on board.

BEAR CREEK: What I'm interested in here is less the movie itself but what it could lead to: Howard has a MUCH more famous character that Disney could adapt in the future. Although I would personally save Conan for when AH-NULD shows up, because that was the movie that made him a star.

JAY WARD: Yes, I forgot him in my earlier post, but I still think Rocky and Bullwinkle will be his debut. Although while we're on the subject, Ward didn't really last that long. In our world, he had a TON of cartoons in the 60s, but by the 70s he was reduced to commercials, and given the more competitive animation industry here I don't see things turning out much better for him. (Granted, the 70s were a bad decade for animation in general, but that's a discussion for another day.)

HARVEY: I agree with TheFaultsofAlts that Fleischer could cooperate with them to create comics, but there's another possibility. Who says it can't go both ways? Maybe we see Harvey characters like Richie Rich or Wendy making their way into full animation.

DISNEYLAND: No comment. Theme parks are not my area of expertise.

WALT: I actually was going to suggest that Walt begin to distance himself from the company. This may sound bizarre, but consider that in our world when he died nobody knew what to do without him and the studio made several movies of rather...dubious quality until Little Mermaid. If they learned to work without him earlier, they wouldn't be hit quite as hard when it happened. (As for the question of WHEN it will happen: the smoking habit obviously took some years off, but Walt wasn't exactly young when he died in our world. I see him lasting a few more years, maybe a decade, but beyond that things get sketchy.)
 
Quite a bit to unpack here, so apologies if this runs a little long.

CARMILLA: This was definitely a surprise. I imagined Disney might have gone into more adult films given enough time, but this was sooner than I expected. Also, points to Disney for getting a soon-to-be-huge star (Marilyn Monroe) on board.

BEAR CREEK: What I'm interested in here is less the movie itself but what it could lead to: Howard has a MUCH more famous character that Disney could adapt in the future. Although I would personally save Conan for when AH-NULD shows up, because that was the movie that made him a star.

JAY WARD: Yes, I forgot him in my earlier post, but I still think Rocky and Bullwinkle will be his debut. Although while we're on the subject, Ward didn't really last that long. In our world, he had a TON of cartoons in the 60s, but by the 70s he was reduced to commercials, and given the more competitive animation industry here I don't see things turning out much better for him. (Granted, the 70s were a bad decade for animation in general, but that's a discussion for another day.)

HARVEY: I agree with TheFaultsofAlts that Fleischer could cooperate with them to create comics, but there's another possibility. Who says it can't go both ways? Maybe we see Harvey characters like Richie Rich or Wendy making their way into full animation.

DISNEYLAND: No comment. Theme parks are not my area of expertise.

WALT: I actually was going to suggest that Walt begin to distance himself from the company. This may sound bizarre, but consider that in our world when he died nobody knew what to do without him and the studio made several movies of rather...dubious quality until Little Mermaid. If they learned to work without him earlier, they wouldn't be hit quite as hard when it happened. (As for the question of WHEN it will happen: the smoking habit obviously took some years off, but Walt wasn't exactly young when he died in our world. I see him lasting a few more years, maybe a decade, but beyond that things get sketchy.)
The Longer the Better

Like Judy Garland and James dean the aim with Marilyn Monroe is to save her from her fate. Since Disney has an image to uphold. I can imagine she would be better of here. And since she's getting close to Theodore, being close to a Disney family member like that will also up her changes.

Conan will come sooner or later. Not yet but I do believe its inventible. Regan is also now a big Disney star so he will feature in more things too. Will have to look into Jay Ward.

The Riche Rich movie is so bad its good but that's OTL. Animation is better so they will very likely come to the big or small screen as well. There gold mines ready to be tapped.

And yes you have hit the nail on the head. It may only be the 50s but as are all painfully aware. The Studios after walt's death suffered greatly. and it took Took till the little mermaid as you said which was 1989 to recover. Now Ub will also have to retire soon but Theodore will be around a while longer. Having the studio run well without walt around well he's around was the key here. The Disney's will begun to die of soon.
 
Top