Part II Next year or in 10/20 years Real time

  • Yes: Next year

    Votes: 10 83.3%
  • No: 10/20 years in the future

    Votes: 2 16.7%
  • Other Choice: Leave a comment.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    12
  • Poll closed .
Or we could have Humongous Entertainment become LucasArts's children's division, thus preserving the Pajama Sam and Putt-Putt franchises while also giving Disney more show, movie, and/or comic ideas.

Well, I pitched for Walt to buy Nintendo during their Hanafuda days. If nothing else, his characters saved the company from going under due to the newfound success for kids when it comes to the Hanafuda cards themselves.
I was reading about Nintendo this morning with my coffee and it seems. They began to produce Disney character cards but that eventuately effected them negativity and they had to shift production to other things. Perfect time to buy them out. On the note of Lucas film, Lucas wont remain in charge of it for very long so who takes over it. Personally I was thinking Timothy Zahn but he is just a writer so maybe sticking him a creative director role be better.

I'm not familiar with Ron Miller: what did he do?

Regarding Humongous: they were a PC game company in the 1990s that made adventure games targeted at children. The "Junior Adventures" were noteworthy for their animation, which was all hand-drawn (you can probably find clips on Youtube), and their sense of humor. They weren't really that popular but they're fondly remembered by those who grew up with their games. However, in this world, they might not exist to begin with, as they were founded by LucasArts developer Ron Gilbert after leaving LucasArts to make his own company: if Disney owns LucasArts from day one it's entirely possible Gilbert never leaves.

Back to Disney, I think it would be rather easy for them to get into video games in this world. The LucasArts stuff would give them an entry into PC gaming, and getting into consoles would be even simpler: just have them license their characters to Capcom as in our world.
He was president and CEO of The Walt Disney Company from 1980 to 1984. Considering the studio suffered badly in that time and only recovered in 89.He is one of those who get blamed.
I dunno why, but now I'm just imagining a Sam and Max game made by Humongous.
I mean. Anything is possible. There also consuming Capcom at some point. Everyone Prepare for Disney Resident Evil.
 
Chapter Thirteen: Dawn of The Golden Age


Chapter Thirteen: Dawn of The Golden Age

Well, the 1950s would be known as the decade the animation war began. This was by many seen as a good thing as the decade also began the golden age that animation would carry upward towards the stars. Nothing seemed impossible in this whole new decade as all companies began to fight it out for the crown. The wartime era which had been drab, dark, and at some pointless gave way to the bright hopeful decade of the 1950s but it was more than just the films that changed. The way life’s where lived also shifted. The economy was booming and soon the seeds laid by those returning home blossomed and prosperity soon flowed. New cars, new planes, suburban houses, and other consumer goods were available to more people than ever before. And that included films, the race was on to set the standard for this brave new frontier of animation.

Warner brother’s joined the face with the Loony toons movie and Fleischer Studios aimed high with an adaptation of Oliver but Walt was more than ready to knock it out of the park and win the first battle in the war of animation. To achieve this goal, Walt knew it was time to go back to the very thing that had propelled them into the spotlight the first time. Fairy-tale had to be harnessed one more after a decade of leaving them behind for other tales. Nobody at the time quite knew if the success of snow white was a one-time thing. The other films had suffered due to the war and none of them had truly dominated the box office. Walt knew that they hit gold the first time but could they gold the second time. It was one question that worried many in the studio but they pushed ahead. It was everything or nothing for the making of Cinderella.

It was not the first time the studio had looked at the classic tale. In 1922, Walt had produced a Laugh-O-Gram cartoon based on the fairy tale. He had also been interested in producing a second version in December 1933 as a Silly Symphony short. The short was planned with Ub Iwerks penned to be the director. Yet the story proved too complicated to be chopped up into a short story and so it became suggested as a motion picture in 1938. One of the first films to be suggested for production. The film would have a fourteen-page outline written by Al Perkins which two years later in 1940 it was re-written by Dana Cofy and Bianca Majolie. Yet this also fell through and the studio moved onto other projects soon after.

By September of 1944 however, four years after the film was shelved Walt restructured it. Dick Huemer and Joe Grant to begin work on Cinderella as story supervisors. When Ruth Disney was freed from other work she also joined the project. She and Rapf decided to make the character more rebellious against her stepfamily in order to be different from the character of snow-white. Rapf himself stated * I made her earn it, and what she had to do to achieve it was to rebel against her stepmother and stepsisters, to stop being a slave in her own home*. The idea was green-lit by Walt who was persuaded by Ruth to keep the rebellious nature inside the film to make Cinderella a stronger character. Walt was to produce the film, one of the only films to release in the 1950s to have his full focus.

With the film needing to go all out, Walt moved to select the best talent he had for the film. Ub Iwerks was selected to direct well Ben Sharpsteen was assigned as supervising producer while Ward Kimball, Wilfred Jackson, and Ollie Johnston became the sequence directors. It would be one of the last films to feature many of the merry folk of Disney in some role as afterward the approaching changes inside the studio would see many of them spin off into different departments. Oliver Wallace was to compose the score. Casting for the film was no easy task. Despite arguments to hire newcomers Walt once again overruled. He insisted a big name could sell the film and a personal friend of his was on the radar as she needed roles. The Casting was still in discussion but soon the news leaked and just two days later. Walt received a phone call from Judy garland and an interview was secured.

Days later garland was cast as Cinderella. Garland has had nothing but appreciation for Walt and the film. In a 1988 interview, garland admitted the film saved her life and restarted Hollywood’s interest in her. She however would always gravitate towards Disney and her friend if a role was on offer. That was how Judy Garland at the age of fifty-five ended up in Star Wars. Well, a well-known actor was cast as Cinderella the studio decided to use an unknown as Prince charming who had a few lines. The crew settled with 19-year-old James Dean as he worked well with Judy garland when the pair met in an arranged interview. Both Dean and Garland were used as live-action references for their characters. Mary Alice O'Connor served as the live-action reference for the Fairy Godmother. Production was finished by October 13, 1949.

The film was released in theaters on February 15, 1950, in Boston, Massachusetts. Walt attended alongside garland, dean, and Roy. The film would go on to win the first battle in the war of animation. The film became a critical success garnering the best reception since the Br'er Rabbit adventures. In a personal letter to Walt Disney, director Michael Curtiz hailed the film as the "masterpiece of all pictures you have done well the newspapers declared Disney is back. It proved to thousands included the studio and Walt that snow white was not a one-time hit but that fairy tales if done right could be a gold mine and were highly successful.

The film was worth more than just its praise, however. The film was Disney's greatest box office success since Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs earning $8 million in gross rentals. By the end of its run, it had earned nearly $4.28 million in North America which made it the fifth highest-grossing film released in North America in 1950. It was the fifth most popular movie at the British box office in 1951. And in France the sixteenth biggest film of all time in terms of admissions with 13.2 million tickets sold. With Europe over the profits began to explode, the success of Cinderella could not be understated. It gave Disney enough money to keep on making films throughout the 1950s well also begun funding the three secret projects only known at the time as project orange grove, project flowing river, and project sunflower. The film also launched the carer of James dean and gave a boost to Judy Garland’s. It also won the Oscars for Best Sound and Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Pictures.

The film was more than just important for Disney’s secret projects. the first effect would be the establishment of Buena Vista Distribution. Ever since its early shorts the company had worked with universal to release its films but now the company was ready to go its own way and that meant releasing its own film. There was no hate on universal’s part and they understood that it would come eventually. The deal would run out in 52 with every film after that to be released by Disney themselves. The establishment of Buena Vista Distribution INC saw the departure of the first two merry folk of Disney as John Lounsbery and Frank Thomas departed to work as head of the new Distribution company. It was a move made to make sure the leadership was trusted.

The next new department created would be one of the most important Disney could have made. Walt himself had seen the power of animated shorts in the 1930s but he now wondered what if you expanded them slightly and stuck them on the quickly Advancing television. Walt had become competently obsessed with the idea of television and so he founded Marceline Animation, named after his hometown. Not yet possible to make their own channel, Walt put out the call for any TV station to embrace his new idea. ABC and NBC rejected it but CBS was all for It and saw the chance to gain what they hoped would be quality-made Disney programs for television. It was a gamble but it was another gamble Walt was prepared to make again.

Marceline Animation would be headed by Ward Kimball, Milt Kahl, and Ollie Johnston which was the departure of three more merry folks from the main movie department. Yet Marceline Animation would prove both profitable for CBS and Disney. Their first show would be called The Oswald and Mickey Revue. The show saw Oswald and Mickey inside a cartoon version of the studio working on their next production before launching you into three randomly presented classic Disney cartoon shorts. It was a simple show yet popular and soon gave way to more tv shows. The next would be The Adventures of Merlin the Magician. The show would serve as a more educational program as merlin and his pet owl named Archimedes attempt to solve real problems and look into the history and other things with things more often than not going wrong.

These two shows relied on new concepts but the new TV animation was not completely against using established ideas. The Briar Patch used stories from the comics to tell further tales of the rabbit and his friends. The show also saw cameos from Oswald and Thumper from Bambi which was integrated into the universe. The last two shows, for now, would be two duck-themed shows as the duck family was extremely popular. The Marshall Plan was a program to provide aid to Western Europe following the devastation of World War II. Donald Duck in Europe was made to foster warmer relations and saw the duck travel Europe in animation as he tells you all you need to know about life in a certain European nation per episode.

The final would be titled Triple trouble. The show saw the adventures of Huey, Dewey, and Louie in school as shenanigans happen around them. Though the show was not as popular as the others it would serve as a prototype for what was to come. It included the first appearance of Bentina Beakley though not in the role she would become known as. Goofy’s Son Max was aged up for the show. The successes of the tv show and the movie were pleasing to the studio. Warner Brothers would win the next fight in the war with their Loony toons film which propelled the characters onto the screen but by now Walt was looking bigger than ever. Project Orange grove was becoming more and more of a reality and a dream but first Disney and his studio would make a movie that would lead to the long-awaited downfall of the hays code.
 
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Chapter Thirteen: Dawn of The Golden Age

Well the 1950s would be known as the decade the animation war began. This was by many seen as a good thing as the decade also began the golden age that animation would carry upward towards the stars. Nothing seemed impossible in this whole new decade as all companies began to fight it out for the crown. The war time era which had been drab, dark and at some pointless gave way to the bright hopeful decade of the 1950s but it was more than just the films that changed. The way life’s where lived also shifted. The economy was booming and soon the seeds laid by those returning home blossomed and prosperity soon flowed. New cars new cars, suburban houses and other consumer goods were available to more people than ever before. And that included films, the race was on to set the standard for this brave new frontier of animation.

Warner brother’s joined the face with the Loony toons movie and Fleischer Studios aimed high with an adaptation of Oliver but Walt was more than ready to knock it out the park and win the first battle in the war of animation. To achieve this goal, walt knew it was time to go back to the very thing that had propelled them into the spotlight the first time. Fairy-tale had to be harnessed one more after a decade of leaving them behind for other tales. Nobody at the time quite knew if the success of snow white was a one-time thing. The other films had suffered due to the war and none of them had truly dominated the box office. walt knew that they hit gold the first time but could they gold the second time. It was one question that worried many in the studio but they pushed ahead. It was everything or nothing for the making of Cinderella.

It was not the first time the studio had looked at the classic tale. In 1922, Walt had produced a Laugh-O-Gram cartoon based on the fairy tale. He had also been interested in producing a second version in December 1933 as a Silly Symphony short. The short was planned with Ub Iwerks penned to be the director. Yet the story proved too complicated to be chopped up into a short story and so it became suggested as a motion picture in 1938. One of the first films to be suggested for production. The film would have a fourteen-page outline written by Al Perkins which two years later in 1940 it was re-written by Dana Cofy and Bianca Majolie. Yet this also fell though and the studio moved onto other projects soon after.

By September of 1944 however, four years after the film was shelved walt restructured it. Dick Huemer and Joe Grant to begin work on Cinderella as story supervisors. When Ruth Disney was freed from other work she also joined on the project. Her and Rapf decided to make the character more rebellious against her stepfamily in order to be different to the character of snow white. Rapf himself stated * I made her earn it, and what she had to do to achieve it was to rebel against her stepmother and stepsisters, to stop being a slave in her own home*. The idea was green lit by walt who was persuaded by Ruth to keep the rebellious nature inside the film to make Cinderella a stronger character. Walt was to produce the film, one of the only films to release in the 1950s to have his full focus.

With the film needing to go all out, Walt moved to select the best talent he had for the film. Ub Iwerks was selected to direct well Ben Sharpsteen was assigned as supervising producer while Ward Kimball, Wilfred Jackson, and Ollie Johnston became the sequence directors. It would be one of the last films to feature many of the merry folk of Disney in some role as afterword the approaching changes inside the studio would see many of them spin off into different departments. Oliver Wallace was to compose the score. Casting for the film was no easy task. Despite arguments to hire newcomers walt once again overruled. He insisted a big name could sell the film and a personal friend of his was in the radar as she needed roles. The Casting was still in discussion but soon the news leaked and just two days later. Walt received a phone call from Judy garland and an interview was secured.

Days later garland was cast as Cinderella. Garland has had nothing but appreciation for walt and the film. In a 1988 interview, garland admitted the film saved her life and restarted Hollywood’s interest her. She however would always gravitate towards Disney and her friend if a role was on offer. That was how Judy Garland at the age of fifty-five ended up in Star Wars. Well a well-known actor was cast as Cinderella the studio decided to use an unknown as Prince charming who had a few lines. The crew settled with 19-year-old James Dean as he worked well with Judy garland when the pair met in an arranged interview. In a first both Dean and Garland where used as the live action reference for their characters. Mary Alice O'Connor served as the live-action reference for the Fairy Godmother. Production was finished by October 13 1949.

The film was released in theaters on February 15, 1950, in Boston, Massachusetts. Walt attended alongside garland, dean and Roy. The film would go on to win the first battle in the war of animation. The film became a critical success garnering the best reception since the Br'er Rabbit adventures. In a personal letter to Walt Disney, director Michael Curtiz hailed the film as the "masterpiece of all pictures you have done well the newspapers declared Disney is back. It proved to thousands included the studio and walt that snow white was not a one-time hit but that fairy tales if done right could be a gold mine and where highly successful.

The film was worth more then just its praise however. The film was Disney's greatest box office success since Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs earning $8 million in gross rentals. By the end of its run, it had earned nearly $4.28 million in North America which made it the fifth highest-grossing film released in North America in 1950. It was the fifth most popular movie at the British box office in 1951. And in France the sixteenth biggest film of all time in terms of admissions with 13.2 million tickets sold. With Europe over the profits began to explode, the success of Cinderella could not be understated. It gave Disney enouth money to keep on making films throughout the 1950s well also begun funding the three secret projects only known at the time as project orange grove, project flowing river and project sunflower. The film also launched the carer of James dean and gave a boost to Judy Garland’s. It also won the Oscars for Best Sound and Best Music, Scoring of a Musical Pictures.

The film was more than just important for Disney’s secret projects. the first effect would be the establishment of Buena Vista Distribution. Ever since its early shorts the company had worked with universal to release its films but now the company was ready to go its own way and that meant releasing its own film. There was no hate on universal’s part and they understood that it would come eventually. The deal would run out in 52 with every film after that to be released by Disney themselves. The establishment of Buena Vista Distribution INC saw the departure of the first two merry folk of Disney as John Lounsbery and Frank Thomas departed to work as head of the new Distribution company. It was a move made to make sure the leadership was trusted.

The next new department created would be one of the most important Disney could have made. Walt himself had seen the power of animated shorts in the 1930s but he now wondered what if you expanded them slightly and stuck them on the quickly Advancing television. Walt had become competently obsessed with the idea of television and so he founded Marceline Animation, named after his home town. Not yet possible to make their own channel, walt put out the call for any TV station to embrace his new idea. ABC and NBC rejected it but CBS was all for It and saw the chance to gain what they hoped would be quality made Disney programs for television. It was a gamble but it was another gamble Walt was prepared to make again.

Marceline Animation would be headed by Ward Kimball, Milt Kahl, and Ollie Johnston which was the departure of three more merry folks from the main movie department. Yet Marceline Animation would prove both profitable for CBS and Disney. There first show would be called The Oswald and Mickey Revue. The show saw Oswald and Mickey inside a cartoon version of the studio working on their next production before launching you into three randomly-presented classic Disney cartoon shorts. It was a simple show yet popular and soon gave way to more tv shows. The next would be The Adventures of Merlin the Magician. The show would serve as a more education program as merlin and his pet owl named Archimedes attempt to solve real problems and look into history and other things with things more often than not going wrong.

These two shows relied on new concepts but the new TV animation was not completely against using established ideas. The Briar Patch used stories from the comics to tell the further tales of the rabbit and his friends. The show also saw cameos from Oswald and Thumper from Bambi which was integrated into the universe. The last two shows for now would be two duck themed shows as the duck family was extremely popular. The Marshall Plan was a program to provide aid to Western Europe following the devastation of World War II. Donald Duck in Europe was made to foster warmer relations and saw the duck travel Europe in an animation as he tells you all you need to know about life in a certain European nation per episode.

The final would be titled Triple trouble. The show saw the adventures of Huey, Dewey, and Louie in school as shenanigans happen around them. Though the show was not as popular as the others it id serve as a prototype for what was to come. It included the first appearance of Bentina Beakley though not in the role she would become known as. Donald and Goofy also Goofy’s Son Max was aged up for the show. The successes of the tv show and the movie where pleasing to the studio. Warner brothers would win the next fight in the war with their Loony toons film which propelled the characters onto screen but by now walt was looking bigger than ever. Project Orange grove was become more and more of a reality and a dream but first Disney and his studio would make a movie that would lead to the long awaited downfall of the of the hays code.
First off, the fact that you casted Judy Garland and James Dean as the leads in Cinderella amazed me when I read through this. And to see Garland become part of the Star Wars mythos is the icing on the cake.

Second, while I do appreciate you using my show ideas, I will say that Triple Trouble, as well as The Marshall Plan to a lesser extent, threw me in for a loop. Plus, given how CBS first started broadcasting with color television in January of 1950, it's safe to assume that the anthology series could also be funded by CBS thanks to the popularity of Marceline Animation's projects.

Third, when and where did the MA programs air? Did they all air on Saturday Mornings? Did a couple of them air in early primetime? Were some of them premiering on too early of a timeslot for kids to watch it, or on too late of a timeslot?

Fourth, I feel like WB deserves second place in this fight, given how iconic the Looney Tunes shorts were and will continue to be.
 
First off, the fact that you casted Judy Garland and James Dean as the leads in Cinderella amazed me when I read through this. And to see Garland become part of the Star Wars mythos is the icing on the cake.

Second, while I do appreciate you using my show ideas, I will say that Triple Trouble, as well as The Marshall Plan to a lesser extent, threw me in for a loop. Plus, given how CBS first started broadcasting with color television in January of 1950, it's safe to assume that the anthology series could also be funded by CBS thanks to the popularity of Marceline Animation's projects.

Third, when and where did the MA programs air? Did they all air on Saturday Mornings? Did a couple of them air in early primetime? Were some of them premiering on too early of a timeslot for kids to watch it, or on too late of a timeslot?

Fourth, I feel like WB deserves second place in this fight, given how iconic the Looney Tunes shorts were and will continue to be.
What can I say. I love the Golden age of hollywood but I know how dark it was as well. Garland was truly fudged by it when she was a child. So to give her a new lease of life via Disney seemed like the perfect way to go about it. Dean is here as well. He was not as much fudged by hollywood but more by his own stupid mistake. Pretty sure being a Disney star is gonna come with some form of rules like ya know don't drive in a car like that. As for Garland in Star wars, being only 55. I can give her a bigger role then anticipated, she was gonna be the aunt from 4 but now I have another place for her. This also butterflies away her death.

I loved your show ideas and I linked your idea to the democratic marshal plan yes. Disney is known for making propaganda and though I wont go much into it. What better way to sell the plan to the American people then to bring Europe home. not the war torn Europe that america knows but the wonders of the land. Duck tales as we know it has slowly but surely been coming together bit by bit. Triple Trouble is just the next step in the road to the show we all know.

I would say that. Triple Trouble, The Briar Patch and the Adventures of Merlin the Magician would be morning saturday shows. there more kid shows well Donald in Europe and The Oswald and Mickey Revue would air in early prime time, before children go to bed. There less complete kids shows and more family shows.
 
Judy Garland as Cinderella, interesting choice. I still think Ilene Woods (OTL Cinderella) should be involved with Cinderella in some capacity though.
 
Judy Garland as Cinderella, interesting choice. I still think Ilene Woods (OTL Cinderella) should be involved with Cinderella in some capacity though.
Since she lost out on Cinderella. She will make her debut in another role though which one I am not yet sure on. Since she's not known for live action it will have to be animated.
 
Since she lost out on Cinderella. She will make her debut in another role though which one I am not yet sure on. Since she's not known for live action it will have to be animated.
Interestingly, Ilene didn't even intend to audition for Cinderella IOTL, she just submitted some demo recordings to Walt and she was chosen like that.
 
That's a bold move that worked. She can either appear in Chanticleer or Alice in Wonderland.
The role of Alice could work, while Kathryn Beaumont still voices Wendy Darling if Disney still makes Peter Pan.
I would say that. Triple Trouble, The Briar Patch and the Adventures of Merlin the Magician would be morning saturday shows. there more kid shows well Donald in Europe and The Oswald and Mickey Revue would air in early prime time, before children go to bed. There less complete kids shows and more family shows.
1: That's a good blend of timeslots.
2: Would all of these begin in 1950? Or would they be spread between a few years? For example, one or two new shows each year.
 
The role of Alice could work, while Kathryn Beaumont still voices Wendy Darling if Disney still makes Peter Pan.

1: That's a good blend of timeslots.
2: Would all of these begin in 1950? Or would they be spread between a few years? For example, one or two new shows each year.
Donald in Europe-1950
The Oswald and Mickey Revue-1950
The Briar Patch-1951
Adventures of Merlin-1952
Triple Trouble-1954

Peter pan is still coming so that works.
 
Donald in Europe-1950
The Oswald and Mickey Revue-1950
The Briar Patch-1951
Adventures of Merlin-1952
Triple Trouble-1954
Peter pan is still coming so that works.
That's a good launching point for Marceline Animation in my opinion.

TheFaultsofAlts

Any ideas for the three theme parks before they get closer. there's 3 for now. 1 in the 50s, 2 in the 60s.
I do have one thing to suggest, now that you're asking for it, albeit in two separate ideas: Earlier debuts for the land of Mickey's Toontown and the attraction of Splash Mountain.

They'd probably be the same as IOTL, except with cameos from Thumper, Flower, and Bambi in Splash Mountain, and walkaround characters for the newer Toons, like Max Goof and Bentina Beakley. It's not much, but it's a good start.
 
That's a good launching point for Marceline Animation in my opinion.

I do have one thing to suggest, now that you're asking for it, albeit in two separate ideas: Earlier debuts for the land of Mickey's Toontown and the attraction of Splash Mountain.

They'd probably be the same as IOTL, except with cameos from Thumper, Flower, and Bambi in Splash Mountain, and walkaround characters for the newer Toons, like Max Goof and Bentina Beakley. It's not much, but it's a good start.
I will say from personal experience that Splash Mountain is one of the best rides. So an earlier debut for that works, don't even have to change it either. Mickey's Toontown is a fine earlier addition but not the biggest fan of the name anymore considering there's a bigger focus on the rest of them just as much mickey. More characters will be out and about so. Also what about a Disney Con at some point, bit like E3 and star wars celebration.
 
Hopefully Disneyland's opening will go better than OTL (and hopefully the walkarounds won't start out as cheap Ice Capades costumes ).
Those costumes are hellish to look out. I can see it going well. What's included in the park is still up in the air, though they may buy more land on purpose just to stop any problems with expansion. If you got anything you want in any of the 3 parks, do feel free to say.
For anyone who's never seen them:
1623529627261.png
 
I will say from personal experience that Splash Mountain is one of the best rides. So an earlier debut for that works, don't even have to change it either.
Cool!
Mickey's Toontown is a fine earlier addition but not the biggest fan of the name anymore considering there's a bigger focus on the rest of them just as much mickey. More characters will be out and about so.
Why not remove Mickey's name from it and call it "ToonTown Terrace"? Just pulling out a potential name. Besides, it's nice that more characters will get costumes.
Also what about a Disney Con at some point, bit like E3 and star wars celebration.
YES! Give me that!
However, would it top this in any way?
Hopefully Disneyland's opening will go better than OTL (and hopefully the walkarounds won't start out as cheap Ice Capades costumes ).
I second this hope.
 
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