What could be some new amendments ratified to the Confederate Constitution, if the Confederacy won its independence?

Somewhere in the late 19th century, I could see the clause which forbade the Confederate Congress from abolishing slavery repealed.

How about it's electoral system changed to a proportional system to allow multiple parties to be seated?

What do you think later amendments would be added to the CS Constitution? Any cliche ones or anti-cliche ones
 
Somewhere in the late 19th century, I could see the clause which forbade the Confederate Congress from abolishing slavery repealed.
Unless the Confederacy unconditionally surrenders a la the Axis powers, this seems highly unlikely. Industrialization and changing economic conditions might lead to more paid laborers, but slaves would still be kept for housework and sex slavery.

An abolitionist Confederacy is a popular way to take the USA down a peg while sidestepping the moral repugnance of the slavery issue, but it's not plausible.
How about it's electoral system changed to a proportional system to allow multiple parties to be seated?
I don't see what makes the CSA any more or less likely to adopt this compared to the USA.
 
Somewhere in the late 19th century, I could see the clause which forbade the Confederate Congress from abolishing slavery repealed.

How about it's electoral system changed to a proportional system to allow multiple parties to be seated?

What do you think later amendments would be added to the CS Constitution? Any cliche ones or anti-cliche ones
The only way for an amendment forbidding the CSA Congress to abolish slavery being repealed is for perhaps the CSA to take a look in the mirror following, say, the Congo Affair or an analogue to it because if they proceed as normal in 1910 like nothing had ever happened they are going to a big-time pariah state (and an even bigger one if the Boll Weevil of the 1920s and 1930s does nothing to change attitudes towards slavery).

As far as parties go, I think it would pretty much be the same system as the USA.
 

Crazy Boris

Banned
If memory serves, the CSA constitution was pretty weak, and unsurprisingly, made secession legally possible and easy. I feel like the CSA is going to fall apart from regional differences that get greater as time goes on unless they strengthen their union, otherwise, what’s to stop the governor of X State from thinking his state would be better off without the rest of the south weighing it down? And from there, we get a Balkanized south that’ll probably throw in the towel one by one and rejoin the North, since I don’t think any southern states in the 1860s-1900s could really survive on their own.
 
If memory serves, the CSA constitution was pretty weak, and unsurprisingly, made secession legally possible and easy. I feel like the CSA is going to fall apart from regional differences that get greater as time goes on unless they strengthen their union, otherwise, what’s to stop the governor of X State from thinking his state would be better off without the rest of the south weighing it down? And from there, we get a Balkanized south that’ll probably throw in the towel one by one and rejoin the North, since I don’t think any southern states in the 1860s-1900s could really survive on their own.
I would argue that the Confederate constitution hypocritically banned secession ad expressly prohibited the end of slavery in any state.
 
Actually, the Confederate Constitution forbade leaving the union, abolishing slavery, and as set up by design, crippled industry. Plus, it set up a federal government in Richmond that, in some regards wpuld be larger and more powerful than the one in DC.

The design of the Confederate government was to make control by the plantation class permanent and unchallenged. Only way that changes is a Confederacy in such a desperate position that it is willing to more or less abandon the very core of its nationhood.

This is why the only way the Confederacy survives to 1900 is as a broken, backwards pariah state. One whose Yankee neighbors look at it the way a lion views a wounded gazelle.
 
IMO the first amendment will be something small and dumb we can’t think of because it will be to fix a problem no one thought of but is needed because it suddenly came up.

Like the 11th amendment.

The biggest amendment early on though would probably be one lifting the ban on infrastructure improvements.
 
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If memory serves, the CSA constitution was pretty weak, and unsurprisingly, made secession legally possible and easy. I feel like the CSA is going to fall apart from regional differences that get greater as time goes on unless they strengthen their union, otherwise, what’s to stop the governor of X State from thinking his state would be better off without the rest of the south weighing it down? And from there, we get a Balkanized south that’ll probably throw in the towel one by one and rejoin the North, since I don’t think any southern states in the 1860s-1900s could really survive on their own.
The constitution was weak but the state was pretty centralized and strong during the war AFAIK.
 
IMO the first amendment will be something small and dumb we can’t think of because it will be to fix a problem no one thought of but is needed because it suddenly came up.

Like the 11th amendment.

The biggest amendment early on though would probably be one lifting the ban on infrastructure improvements.

They mostly got around that during the war by saying "military expediency" which would probably become a pretty catchy refrain. Need to build a railroad? Why what will we do if there's a slave uprising and our boys in grey can't get there in time? Military expediency! Better roads? Military expediency! New factory? Military expediency!

Truthfully not many people actually cared about building industry so long as they made money one way or another, constitution be damned.

I too am shocked that a nation founded on slavery, and flouting constitutional norms would be so casual about subverting it's own constitution. Shocked I tell you!
 
The CSA Constitution was already ratified before the northern South had joined and it was a good artifact or wish list for what the early secessionists and fire eaters from the cotton states wanted from the state. But, the kicker is the state was not led by one of them and the war enabled pretty massive changes to their vision. The CSA Constitution wasn't Articles of Confederation weak, but it was not far from that.
 
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RousseauX

Donor
Plus, it set up a federal government in Richmond that, in some regards wpuld be larger and more powerful than the one in DC.
How so?

The impression I get is that the centralization of the government was an effect of the -war- and not the constitution, which by design left Richmond pretty weak.

The strong executive in the CSA was also (partially) due to the lack of developed Confederate political parties which could serve as vehicle for opposition to organize against the administration, that seems like it would change if the CS survived.
 
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An amendment for tariffs post war seems to have been coming. As early as 1862 most of the Confederate establishment was wanting to abolish the anti-tariff articles in the constitution partially due to the ironic fact that tariffs were turning out to be massive revenue sources for the confederates.
 
Perhaps an amendment that would extend the one-term only, 6-year Presidential term to 2 terms.

And maybe an amendment that would allow the Confederate Congress to also be allowed to propose amendments which it could not do under the original Confederate Constitution.
 
Unless the Confederacy unconditionally surrenders a la the Axis powers, this seems highly unlikely. Industrialization and changing economic conditions might lead to more paid laborers, but slaves would still be kept for housework and sex slavery.
If international opinion turns against them strongly enough, I could see them replacing slavery with some sort of apartheid-type system to avoid becoming international pariahs.

(I mean, it's not like a state with an explicitly racist ideology can't be made to abandon or modify said ideology if under enough pressure -- just look at apartheid-era South Africa, for example.)
I would argue that the Confederate constitution hypocritically banned secession ad expressly prohibited the end of slavery in any state.
It wasn't hypocritical -- secession wasn't prohibited under the US Constitution, and hence, under the Confederate reading, states were allowed to secede under the Tenth Amendment. By forbidding secession in their own constitution they removed this loophole, but they weren't imposing double standards on their constituent states.
 
If international opinion turns against them strongly enough, I could see them replacing slavery with some sort of apartheid-type system to avoid becoming international pariahs.
Why would they care about being an international pariah? They didn't mind holding onto the institution when the rest of the country had abandoned it as backwards; in fact they kept trying to expand it. These people started the bloodiest war in American history to preserve slavery. I don't see them giving it up just because David Lloyd George and Raymond Poincaré ask nicely.
 
Why would they care about being an international pariah? They didn't mind holding onto the institution when the rest of the country had abandoned it as backwards; in fact they kept trying to expand it. These people started the bloodiest war in American history to preserve slavery. I don't see them giving it up just because David Lloyd George and Raymond Poincaré ask nicely.
They would care if the British and French use it as an excuse to boycott their cotton imports. Perhaps the British could even use that excuse both to pressure the CSA (and thus look like a moral paragon to other Europeans) and encourage the growth of their own cotton market in the Colonies.
 
It's gonna be ironic if Haiti revives it's cotton industry and becomes an alternative once it becomes a pariah state if slavery is still there to the CSA cotton
 
If the CSA ever banned or abolished slavery, they would be the biggest monsters in North American history. The South kicked off the Civil War, killing hundreds of thousands of people, so they could keep slavery, now they just going to get rid of it? Not a single person in the USA or "enlightened" nations would have any respect or trust for them.
 
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