Vive Les Marquis! A Canadien Timeline

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Talus I of Dixie, Aug 7, 2019.

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  1. Threadmarks: Chapter 1: The Battle of Blenheim

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    The Alliance Falls in Blenheim
    800px-The_Battle_of_Hoechstaedt.jpg
    The Triple French Attack Deciding the Battle of Blenheim

    In the midst of the battle, Clérambault remains calm about the persistent attacks on Blenheim, and does not dispatch the reserve battalions. With this, Cutts proceeds with the third attack on the village and is repelled again by the French, with the british suffering more casualties and being forced to retreat to re-order.

    Meanwhile in Lutzingen, the attack by Prinz Eugen of Savoy's troops was also repelled, with many casualties included, the french and bavarians were exhausted and could not take advantage, but Marshal Marsin sees the opportunity and asks Tallard to send the reserve battalions to pursue victory against the imperial troops, Camille sends the reserves, which are able to surround the already panicked imperial troops trying to cross the Nebel. With Eugen trying to organize the troops to perhaps resist the attack, the defection had already taken the field, and after fighting with his troops for as long as possible, the prince is forced to surrender to the Marshal.

    Later, the Duke of Marlborough crosses the Nebel and begins his advance, going as far as is convenient, the elite cavalry Gens d'Armes charges against the british, and to everyone's surprise, was repelled. Duc de Tallard soon realizes that the situation is complicated, and asks Marshal Marsin for reinforcements, the same delivers the reserve battalions to Camille immediately, and with the imperial army being no more, the Marshal orders the franco-bavarian troops to cross the Nebel to attack the british flank by attacking the dutch column of Prince of Holstein-Beck in conjunction with the franco-irish troops in the village of Oberglauheim, quickly crushing the column. At that moment the Duke noticed the absence of Prinz Eugen, and began to organize an urgent withdrawal.

    At this time, the troops under Clérambault in Blenheim attacked Cutts' troops, using their numerical superiority to force back the british left flank. At the same time, Marsin's troops were reaching the Duke of Marlborough's right flank maneuvering to completely surround the troops. Tallard ordered for his part a total attack in the center, the triple attack besides exposing the Duke's troops to a great firepower, forced his troops to retreat with the Nebel in his back. John Churchill orders a total withdrawal of the troops, which forces him to sacrifice even more troops to allow the rest to cross the Nebel.

    During the retreat, Churchill and his troops would be harassed by the bavarian cavalry, yielding even more casualties to the british. By the end of the day, the french would have won one of the most important victories in the history, and probably of their millennium. Suffering 7.821 casualties between dead and wounded, against 36.723 of the Great Alliance, not to mention the capture of Prinz Eugen of Savoy, and besides that, now the road to Vienna was open.
     
  2. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    Hon Hon Hon! Vive le Québec libre!
     
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  3. Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    Now i'm sure i'll use this phrase later
     
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  4. Threadmarks: Chapter 2: 1704 After Blenheim

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    The Answer To Blenheim
    (1704 in the War of Spanish Succession)
    300px-Beleg_van_Bergen_op_Zoom,_1588_van_Parma.JPG
    Capture of Berg op Zoom in September 22
    Following the overwhelming victory at Blenheim, the french continued their advance into Austria, uniting with an additional 17.400 bavarian troops in the heart of the electorate, and defeating Ludwig of Baden's imperial forces at the Battle of Regensburg in early September. Leopold I is soon obliged to negotiate with Ferenc Rákóczi's revolt in the Kingdom of Hungary, as the revolt is occupying many Austrian troops, which at the moment is to prevent the french from arriving in Vienna, the negotiations do nothing but delay Leopold, with Ferenc being advised by the french to bargain as much as possible, the close of negotiations comes with the transfer of troops from Hungary to Austria in order to defend against the imminent french invasion.

    The Count of Starhemberg is ordered to withdraw from Italy to aid in the defense of Austria, forcing the savoyards to stand alone against french power under Phillippe de Vendôme, who, after learning of the austrian withdrawal, focuses all his forces on the subjugation of Savoy, establishing control of basically the entire Duchy with the exception of Turin by the end of the year, with the siege of Turin being planned for next year.

    On the Iberian peninsula, Spain's Felipe forces captured Castelo Branco on the Luso-Spanish border, accompanied by other minor victories along the border. But the attention was focused on the Twelfth Siege of Gibraltar, which although not much development by the end of the year, would be the main event of the theater.

    The Battle of Blenheim also caused disruptions within the Grand Alliance itself, with the dutch getting into serious trouble with the Duke of Marlborough due to the practical destruction of the dutch forces in Blenheim. Taking advantage of the dutch weakening, the french attacked the Brabant Line with everything before winter came, taking Huy and Elixheim in the south, Eckeren and Berg op Zoom to the north, entering dutch territory. The arrival of winter would show a precarious situation of the Grand Alliance on the continent.

    In North America, Benjamin Church conducted the attack at Grand-Pre, in Acadia. Apart from the attack on Grand-Pre, nothing major happened.
     
  5. DanMcCollum P-WI

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    Oh, THIS I plan on following. I've actually had a hankering for learning more about the History of Quebec, and I've got a soft spot for 'local' timelines which focus largely on an often overlooked region.
     
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  6. galanx Member

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    What? The slogan of a bunch of scummy colonial habitants who revolted against their rightful French sovereign?
     
  7. Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    :openedeyewink: Let's see
     
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  8. Dylanperr Well-Known Member

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    Great timeline. I am going to make a timeline where the French win the Seven Years War.
     
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  9. Dylanperr Well-Known Member

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    Hon Hon Hon.
     
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  10. Threadmarks: Chapter 3: 1705

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    Everything Blows Up
    (1705 in the War of Spanish Succesion)
    Siege_of_Vienna_1529_by_Pieter_Snayers.jpeg
    Maximilian II in the Siege of Vienna
    The new campaign season began with the french offensive in the Netherlands, resulting in the disastrous (for the dutch) Battle of Geel in March, where a force of 37.000 French under the Duke of Berwick faced a force of 12.000 Dutch and completely obliterated the dutch. Giving way to the offensive to capture Liège (22 March), Maastricht (18 April), Stevensweert (26 May), Roermond (2 July), Venlo (21 July) and Gelder (17 August) throughout the Meuse, getting until the end of the year the reconquest of Cologne. In the center, the french captured Eindhoven (August 1) after 4 months of siege, and after that arrived in October on the Meuse River. Along the coast, the force that captured Bergen op Zoom was able to advance to Breda, also arriving at the Meuse, while the french conducted a successful operation to perform the occupation of Zeeland, laying siege of Rotterdam in July and capturing the city on 3 December.

    In the Iberian peninsula, the Siege of Gibraltar ended in victory for the defenders, but it is little for a worthy celebration compared to the rest of the year. The success in Blenheim made France available to distribute its reserves to Spain. With new 42.000 troops arriving in Spain under the command of Louis de Boufflers, the army first relieves the Siege of Barcelona by the Grand Alliance forces, saving the city and overthrowing the Catalan revolt against Bourbon rule, after that, they went to the portuguese border to help contain the anglo-portuguese counteroffensive on the border, achieving satisfactory results after beating portuguese troops under the Marquis de Minas in Isna, managing to capture Sertã, ensuring control of the hills in the region. In other regions the status quo was maintained, with the Spanish managing to keep the soil won last year.

    Meanwhile in New France, the Marquis of Vaudreuil sends a request for 2.100 men to the metropolis to establish a siege of St. John's, the main english settlement in Newfoundland, the request is accepted and the soldiers are sent. The Marquis tells Daniel d'Auger of Subercase to wait for reinforcements to make the attack. The result was the fall of St. John's in May, after 2 months of siege, no further movement occurred in the Americas.

    Leaving Bavaria, the french enter austrian territory with no less than 127.000 troops, Duc de Tallard divides the army in two, 85.000 led by him and Maximilian II toward Vienna, and 42.000 under Marshal Marsin to intercept any prussian reinforcement to the north. On 19 May, Linz is besieged by the forces of the Duc of Tallard, on 7 June, the forces under Marsin meet a small prussian army in the village of Pilgrams [Pelhřimov], the army was going as reinforcement to Vienna and is completely defeated being outnumbered by more than 4 to 1, after this battle the marshal would be able to put the entire Bohemian Kingdom under occupation in the coming months and the prussians would open negotiations of peace with Paris.

    On 21 June, Linz fell to the French forces, which on 14 July (Interestingly, exactly 22 years after the beginning of the Ottoman Siege of Vienna) would begin the Siege of Vienna. Maximilian's and Tallard's plan was to starve the city while subjecting the city to frequent bombardment by the french artillery, and when it seemed convenient, to assault the city. With no help coming and the hungarians capturing Bratislava in September, the fate of Vienna was already decided. On 3 October, the hungarians arrived in Vienna, contributing more men to the siege work, which on 11 October saw a major assault on the city, ending in the conquest and plunder of Vienna by the hungarians and the french. Three days later, Leopold I would be required to sign the Treaty of Favoriten, resulting in the austrian exit from the war.

    Treaty of Favoriten (14/10/1705)
    - The Archduchy of Austria recognizes Felipe, Duke of Anjou as legitimate King of Spain and all their respective domains
    - The Archduchy of Austria recognizes the independence of the Kingdom of Bohemia and the Kingdom of Hungary
    - The Archduchy of Austria cedes Tyrol to the Electorate of Bavaria
    - The Archduchy of Austria renounces the imperial crown of the Holy Roman Empire, passing it to Maximilian II of Bavaria


    The response to the treaty was shocking, with Carlos III of Spain losing the support of the austrian armies and the Grand Alliance losing its main source of soldiers, the dutch government in response to this and the results of the french offensive suddenly signing peace in December in the Treaty of Rotterdam, leaving England alone with Portugal.

    Treaty of Rotterdam (19/12/1705)
    - The Republic of the Seven Provinces of the Netherlands recognizes Philip, Duke of Anjou as legitimate King of Spain and his domains
    - The Republic of the Seven Provinces of the Netherlands will allow the Kingdom of France to use the Dutch Navy
    - The Republic of the Seven Provinces of the Netherlands will cede to Spain the territory of Maastricht


    The british army in the Netherlands would be evacuated a few days later, and by next year, the english would be alone in the war.
     
  11. Threadmarks: Chapter 4: 1706

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    England Stands Alone
    (1706 in the War of Spanish Succesion)
    300px-Vendome-and-PhilipV.jpg
    Felipe V and Vendôme arriving after the Battle of Porto

    In January, the prussians and the french would sign the Treaty of Breslau, making the prussian exit from the war official.

    Treaty of Breslau (19/01/1706)
    - The Kingdom of Prussia recognizes Felipe, Duke of Anjou as legitimate King of Spain and his domains
    - The Kingdom of Prussia will pay 70.000 livres as compensation to the Kingdom of France
    - The Kingdom of Prussia will cede the Duchy of Cleves-Mark to the Kingdom of Spain


    Portugal and England were alone in the war, with Portugal being the main focus of Charles III's forces, the end of the war in the east allowed France to help Spain with all their might, and this became a very important factor in 1706.

    The Habsburgs in Portugal received 22.000 soldiers from the english army, preparing for a new offensive from Portugal and a new front to be opened in Andalusia. Little did they know that the Spanish would make their own offensive with french help.

    But well, the Luso-English offensive began first on May 3, with 23.000 troops attacking the spanish positions in Nisa, Sertã and Chaves. Duc of Boufflers soon reacts to the attack, with his troops lifting the Siege of Sertã on May 17 and a counteroffensive in Entre-Douro-e-Minho starting, moving rapidly and capturing the cities of Viana do Castelo (May 21), Braga (May 26), Guimarães (29 May) and laying siege to Porto on 4 June.

    The attack soon forced Marquis of Minas to abandon the attack on Chaves and move to the coast to fight the forces of the Duke of Berwick in Porto. Upon arriving there, the Marquis would be decisively defeated at the Battle of Porto (June 21), with his army of 9.000 soldiers suffering 4.000 casualties between dead and wounded. Porto would fall a week later.

    Further south, after breaking the siege of Sertã, Duc of Boufflers pursued the English army of the Earl of Galway who had attacked the city. Capturing Tomar on 25 May and outmaneuvering the Huguenot, with armies meeting near Santarém, with the Earl defeated at the Battle of Chamusca (June 16), after which Boufflers' troops moved directly to Lisbon. The attack on Lisbon was followed by a naval expedition under the command of René Duguay-Trouin and Claude de Forbin to Portugal, an expedition that overwhelmingly beat an english fleet at the Battle of Foz (July 11, Figueira da Foz), allowing the French to block Lisbon by sea and break the arrival of supplies to the campaign in Andalusia. The Siege of Lisbon would last until August 29, when Portugal surrendered to the Franco-Spanish forces in the Treaty of Lisbon.

    In Andalusia, on May 17, 8.300 troops under James Stanhope crossed the Línea de la Concepción and effectively opened a new front in the Iberian Peninsula, in less than 2 days capturing Algeciras and capturing Marbella on May 25, and overcoming the spanish garrisons of Málaga and almost arriving in Cadiz, stopped only by the resistance of the Spanish fleet at the Battle of Trafalgar (June 15) against the Royal Navy. 14.000 troops under the Marquis of Valdecañas were sent to contain the English invasion of Andalusia. After achieving a strategic victory in Cádiz (July 4), removing the dangers to the port by the british forces. With english troops in Andalusia cut off from their naval supply lines, the Marquis managed to win the Battle of the Gazules (July 28), forcing Stanhope to retreat through Los Alcornocales to Algeciras. The Marquis soon crossed too and headed toward Marbella and Málaga, with the cities falling in the middle of August. The end of the campaign was sealed on September 3, shortly after the portuguese surrender, at the Battle of Secadero, where the remaining 7.000 Stanhope's troops faced the Marquis' forces outnumbered 3 to 1. James Stanhope would be forced to surrender at the end of the battle, and after arriving in Gibraltar and finding a garrison blocked by the spanish fleet and with no hope of reinforcements, the stone falls without a shot on 8 September. And the British definitely leave the continent.

    Treaty of Lisboa (29/08/1706)
    - The Kingdom of Portugal recognizes Felipe, Duke of Anjou as legitimate King of Spain and his domains
    - The Kingdom of Portugal will allow the Kingdom of France to use the Portuguese Navy
    - The Kingdom of Portugal will pay 40.000 livres to the Kingdom of Spain


    Portugal's departure from the war and the fall of Gibraltar sealed the end of the continental war. Tories' opposition to the war in England became declared after Portugal left, saying that "England cannot fight alone against its many enemies, a defeat now will be a victory in the future. A defeat tomorrow will be a disaster for the country."

    By 1707, the Tories would prove to be right, since the french would target England. And they would have a well-known guide with them to hit the shot.
     
  12. Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    Thanks!
     
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  13. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    When will this TL start affecting French Canada?
     
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  14. Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    After the peace in the WoSS
     
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  15. rfmcdonald Well-Known Member

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    Like!
     
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  16. Threadmarks: Chapter 5: 1707-08

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    The End Comes
    (1707-08 in the War of Spanish Succession)
    Glen_shiel.jpg
    British Troops Engaging in the Hills of Crawford

    The year began with the continent secured by franco-spanish forces. But on the other side of a not-so-long channel was the last opponent, the last challenge, England, and how to defeat it was already planned.

    The fleet under René Duguay-Trouin and Claude de Forbin was deployed in La Rochelle after peace with Portugal, along with a sizeable portuguese fleet containing the largest and best portuguese and spanish ships. In the channel, the Ponant Fleet was armed for the attack and also relying on dutch ships, an army of 72.000 troops under the Duc de Villars was positioned on the canal for a possible invasion by the canal, while 14.000 under the Duc of Boufflers were on the atlantic coast.

    But well, the plan was simple, or at least it was meant to be: The fleet at La Rochelle would evade the british blockade and head for Saint-Pierre, in Martinique. After that, cross the atlantic back to disembark at Inverness to assist the jacobite rebellion marked after the Act of Union passed in May of 1707. After a storm forced the british to break up the blockade at the end of June. The fleet left port for the Atlantic, arriving in Martinique on July 22, resupplying and heading towards Scotland. The fleet would land at Inverness on August 17, along with James III, and soon the jacobite rebellion would begin, capturing Kiliwhimin [Fort Augustus] on August 28 and Fort William on September 18, in October capturing Edinburgh (and thereby weapons for up to 10.000 soldiers and 100.000 pounds). On 12 October, under the command of the Duc de Boufflers, franco-jacobite troops, already having 36.000 troops, defeated british government forces under the Duke of Marlborough at the Battle of Crawford, taking advantage of the enemy outnumbered 3-to-1, after this battle, the rebels gained control of Scotland and joined the english Jacobites in northern England, reaching the Preston-Manchester-Leeds-York-Middlesbrough line later this year. The defeat at Crawford only increased the total panic the british government was living in, especially after the fleet of Duguay-Trouin and Forbin decisively defeated a british fleet at the Battle of Rùm on 12 September, ensuring the weird french control of the Scottish waters.

    In February, the "Expédition Canadienne" left Brest heading for Quebéc under the Duc of Orleáns, bringing 7.000 troops to the french side on the American continent. The arrival of the expedition in Quebec would terrify the Duc, who would soon enter into debate with the Marquis of Vaudreuil (governor of New France) about the colony's situation, the Marquis simply replied: "We don't have enough settlers, we don't have enough investments. No wonder why most of the people here are leaving soon after they arrive? Potential? A lot, production? Less than the minimum that this land can produce." That would echo in the Duc's head for a long time, but he still had work to do. Delivering an overwhelming victory against the british by lifting the Siege of Port Royal in June. Destroying more than half of the 1,000 soldiers who were part of the siege, the Duc then joined the Wabanaki Confederation to capture Fort Loyal [Portland, Maine] and Salmon Falls [Berwick, Maine], The Androscoggin removed to St. Francis in the last war began to be relocated back to their homeland after the capture.

    But it would not be the rebellion that would most frighten the british that year, what would most frighten would be the Ponant Fleet Offensive in October, under the command of Victor-Marie d'Estrées, winning the Battle of Antifer (near Cap d'Antifer) against a British fleet under Sir John Norris, clearing the channel for the french invasion, with the Duc de Villars landing at Milford on Sea on 3 October, capturing Southampton on 19, and Portsmouth on 7 November at the end. Duc de Villars would be able to establish a permanent point in the south of England on a Poole-Basingstoke-Worthing line after beating the british under the Duke of Argyll on December 4 at the Battle of Winchester. Following this, the british government enters into immediate negotiations with France.

    The beginning of 1708 would see peace being made very quickly, with the british parliament accepting the humiliating terms demanded by the french in the Treaty of Reading, effectively ending the War of Spanish Succession.


    Treaty of Reading (9/01/1708)
    - The United Kingdom of Great Britain recognizes Felipe, Duke of Anjou as legitimate King of Spain and his domains
    - Queen Anne of Great Britain renounces the throne in favor of her half-brother James Francis Edward Stuart. For a compromise, the king should not interfere with the affairs of the Anglican Church, but anti-Catholic laws on british soil will be repealed.
    - The United Kingdom of Great Britain recognizes French claims in the New World, setting the borders accordingly (Thus: Terre-Neuve, Rupert's Land and Maine are recognized as French territory).
    - The United Kingdom of Great Britain will pay 240.000 livres to France
    - The United Kingdom of Great Britain cedes to France the Channel Islands


    The signing of the treaty was consequently succeeded by the coronation of James Francis Edward Stuart as James I of Great Britain. By the end of February all french troops on the Isle of Great Britain would be evacuated by the canal, but not being stupid, the french took as many ships as possible from their dockyards, and what they couldn't bring was burned and much of the infrastructure destroyed. In Paris, a victory march would take place with the troops of Boufflers and Villars, french hegemony in Europe was assured.
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019
  17. Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    Taking advantage that the next chapter will be the next years in New France, leave your questions here that i will answer them with pleasure :rolleyes:
     
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  18. Death's Little Helper Well-Known Member

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    Very nice. Can't wait to see the butterflies flying across the Atlantic .
     
  19. Threadmarks: Chapter 6: New France 1708-1724

    Talus I of Dixie The hymn of Tuva is just perfect

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    "La Grand Croissance"
    (New France 1708-1724)

    GG-Vaudreuil.jpg
    Philippe de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil, Governor of New France and Architect of "La Grand Croissance"

    After the end of the War of the Spanish Succession, New France finally saw well-established borders since its founding. A vast empire in its own right, from the tropical mouth of the Mississippi to the icy shores of Hudson Bay, the immediate years after the war were marked by an increase in investment and efforts to settle the colony by Louis XIV, which had the attention drawn to New France by the Duc d'Orleáns. In 1711, at the Duke's own command, was founded at the mouth of the Mississippi River what would be the future capital of Louisiana, "La Nouvelle-Orleans". Began to be paid by the french monarchy whole convoys of settlers to New France, with the colony growing around the St. Lawrence River and the Great Lakes. At the death of Sun King Louis XIV, the colony's population rose from 10.749 in 1708 to 44.472 in 1715. The giant growth and coming of settlers to New France is placed on the shoulders of Duc d'Orleáns-led crown investments. (literally, as much as he can convince Louis XIV to invest), with the construction of several bridges on the St. Lawrence River and the Quebéc-Montréal-Detroit road.

    During this time, the exploration of the new territories in Hudson Bay was in full swing, with the creation of the trading post of Vendat [Winisk] at the mouth of the named Léflour River [Winisk River], named after the founder of Vendat, Charles-Pierre Léflour, becoming the main point for fur trade in the region, which generates a lot of profit for the colony and, consequently, for the crown. Other settlements founded were: Orly [Happy Valley-Goose Bay], Nouvelle-Brest [Channel Port aux Basques], Tamiuèsguejanne [Sillarsville], Toronto and Checagou [Chicago]. The trading forts also began to grow with part of the population living in them.

    Following the death of Louis XIV and the arrival of the Duc d'Orleáns regency, New France experienced an even greater phase of economic and population growth. With the beginning of the exploration of the Ohio River Valley and grain plantations being erected by settlers arriving in the St. Lawrence estuary area, adding extra food to the crown deposits. During this period also came the construction of Phillippesbourg Fortress [Lebanon, Maine] on the border with the british colony of Massachussets and the beginning of the Orleanese War for control of the Great Lakes and the Ohio River Valley. In addition to the building of an efficient road system connecting the main parts of the colony. To the north was being founded the trading post of Biozat [Webequie], the french manage to forge an economic alliance with the natives of the region and almost monopolize the american fur trade.

    Philippe de Rigaud, Marquis de Vaudreuil was also very important for this phase of the colony's growth. With him commanding a strong propaganda effort from the colony, hiring renowned painters to paint the "New Wonders of New France". In addition, he managed to convince soldiers from metropolitan france in the Orleanese War to settle after the war in Upper Louisiana.

    Louisiana has also gone through investment and growth, with a plan to send prostitutes and prisoners there, initially working out with the population quadrupling. Despite this, the Mississippi Company being closed in 1721 stopped the loading of prisoners. Philippe de Rigaud then persuaded the regent to allow the colonial government of New France itself to pay for the prisoners' travels to maintain Louisiana's population growth, which, accompanied by the arrival of volunteer settlers corresponding to the governor's advertisements, resulted in the population of 28.842 Europeans (mainly Alsatians, Aquitaine and prisoners in general) on Lower Louisiana in the time of Duc d'Orleáns death, while the rest of New France at the same time would have 232.748 Europeans. It was during the Duc d'Orleáns regency that the colonization of the Great Lakes region gained momentum, and consequently broke out the Orleanese War in 1724.

    The french economy boomed with the population growth and massive investment during that time, with fishing gaining new expansions in Hudson Bay and Acadia, shipbuilding also gained momentum with the reform of the port of Quebéc and the construction of the ports of Tadoussac, Plaisance, Nouvelle-Orleans, Montréal, Phillipesbourg and Vendat. On the continent, the exportation of cereals and wheat to the rest of the french colonial empire served to fill the colony's coffers along with the fur trade, creating the class of "Atlantiques", traders from New France working in the french intercolonial trade, the increase in the colonial population also increased the demand for fur coats, which subsequently created the first captive beaver creations in the colony, with the aim of keeping the fur supply stable.

    The colony would enter another phase of its life with the beginning of the Orleanese War and the start of the active fight between french settlers, indians and british settlers.
     
    Last edited: Aug 17, 2019
  20. Hot Dad Y'all aint never seen a fella do this before

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    Lol fun fact ive never heard this in Canada but its the go to first thing that most every Frenchman I've ever spoken french to has said
     
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