Vider Avan i Sur: A FHTL in Maps

OP
Welcome to 2050. Some things have changed. Here is the map, where do you wish to go?
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This is a reboot of my old FHTL Ĉio Sub la Steloj. Some familliar faces are still here, like the United States of Europe.
 

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Is that an independent Dutch Caribbean?
Why are Greece and Sweden not part of the USE?
Is there a major movement for Greece and/or Sweden to join the USE?
What happened to Ethiopia, Pakistan, Burma, China, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Brazil, and the USA?
Is that united Maghreb?
When and how did Quebec go independent?
Why are there so many states that merged in the USA?
You mentioned something on the map thread about one of the far-eastern Russian states being propped up by America - how's that going now that America doesn't have a pacific coast?
Are any of the countries shown on the map not UN members, or lacking full recognition? Which?
What are the world's top economies?
What is the USE's system of government?
What is the general situation in the Middle East?
What major wars have been fought in the past thirty years?
Why are the Channel Islands part of the USE and not England?
Who united Korea?
What happened with Israel and Palestine?
What were some of the factors driving Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands to join Japan after America lost its presence in the Pacific? Why not independence, or joining Micronesia, or something else?
How did England manage to keep the Falklands, South Georgia, and the Sandwich Islands when they lost the Channel Islands?
What happened in Cyprus?
 
Is that an independent Dutch Caribbean?
Yes. Actually it is ruled by the Dutch government in exile.
Why are Greece and Sweden not part of the USE?
Greece left the EU in 2027 and thus was never invited to join the USE. Sweden (and Albania and Cyprus) all voted against joining.
Is there a major movement for Greece and/or Sweden to join the USE?
Yes, but they have not got the majority needed to officially join as new states.
What happened to Ethiopia, Pakistan, Burma, China, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Brazil, and the USA?
All of them suffered a messy breakup or civil war.
  • Ethiopia had the Tigray, Afar, and Somali regions secede in the 2020s, in that order. (Also note the independent Somaliland.)
  • Pakistan fell into civil war in the 2040s. Sindh joined India.
  • Burma has always been in a state of civil war. It's more stable now, though.
  • China is the only one that hasn't suffered a messy breakup or civil war. After Xi Jinping's death in 2029, Li Keqiang became president of China, and instituted various reforms, including reinstituting a term limit, officially legalising gay marriage, reorganising China's provinces on ethnic lines, ending the oppression of minorities, and installing some basic human rights. He also allowed cut-down Tibetan and Uyghur states limited independence (they are de facto independent, but much administration is carried out form Beijing).
  • Saudi Arabia went through a revolution in 2026 and outright collapsed.
  • Russia went through a civil war in 2027. Various factions managed to carve out independence, including Chechen, Dagestani and Yakut seperatists and the pro-EU Kuban clique in Russia's south. Many joined the EU for protection and became part of the USE when it was formed in 2037.
  • Brazil had both the north and south secede.
  • America went through a civil war in 2025. New England, Texas, California, Oregon, Washington, and Hawaii all managed to secure independence. Alaska joined Canada.
Is that united Maghreb?
Yes. Formed on similar principles to the USE and East Africa, it didn't go as well as expected.
When and how did Quebec go independent?
2025, by majority vote.
Why are there so many states that merged in the USA?
Mostly to save on costs.
You mentioned something on the map thread about one of the far-eastern Russian states being propped up by America - how's that going now that America doesn't have a pacific coast?
It was funded by social media, particularly Reddit.
Are any of the countries shown on the map not UN members, or lacking full recognition? Which?
The only entity shown on the map without recognition is Darfur, currently at war with Sudan.
What are the world's top economies?
  1. China
  2. United States of Europe
  3. India
  4. (Baghdad Accord)
  5. Nigeria
  6. East African Federation
  7. Indonesia
  8. United States of America
  9. Maghreb Federation
  10. California
  11. Democratic Republic of the Congo
  12. Iran*
  13. Japan
  14. Russia
  15. Ethiopia
  16. Korea
  17. Argentina
  18. Canada
  19. Brazil
  20. Thailand
  21. Turkey*
  22. Egypt
  23. Texas
  24. Ghana
  25. South Brazil
  26. South Africa
  27. Philippines
  28. Australia
  29. Punjab
  30. England
  31. Mexico
What is the USE's system of government?
Parliamentary federal republic. All of the states maintain a degree of autonomy.
What is the general situation in the Middle East?
Way better than OTL. Most countries in the Middle East are part of the Baghdad Accord, a multinational organisation. Democracy, religious tolerance and women's rights are the new normal and peace is maintained. Borders have been redrawn along ethnic an religious lines.
What major wars have been fought in the past thirty years?
  • Burmese Civil War (-2031)
  • Second American Civil War (2025-26)
  • Arabian Revolutionary War (2026)
  • Second Russian Civil War (2027)
  • Pakistani Civil War (2039-2044)
  • Darfur Insurrection (204:cool:
Why are the Channel Islands part of the USE and not England?
Surrendered when England abolished the monarchy.
Who united Korea?
A neutral government.
What happened with Israel and Palestine?
United under a one country, two systems approach.
What were some of the factors driving Guam and the Northern Mariana Islands to join Japan after America lost its presence in the Pacific? Why not independence, or joining Micronesia, or something else?
They would literally be struggling to stay afloat if they became independent or joined Micronesia.
How did England manage to keep the Falklands, South Georgia, and the Sandwich Islands when they lost the Channel Islands?
Sorry, that's an error. They are part of Argentina.
What happened in Cyprus?
Baghdad Accord-mediated peace.
 
Dagestan - The Rainbow State
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Map of Dagestan with the Autonomous Regions highlighted
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Flag of Dagestan
Dagestan is one of the 45 states of the United States of Europe, located in the Caucasus region and the Russian Rim. Uniquely, Dagestan has no single working language; all statewide business is done in Simplified English or Russian (the former being preferred due to the USE government's de-Russianization policies). The state is covered entirely by ten Autonomous Regions - Agul AR, Avar AR, Azeri AR, Dargin AR, Kumyk AR, Lak AR, Lezgin AR, Nogai AR, Rutul AR, and Tabasaran AR - , each having their own official language; there are also dozens of smaller languages that have no official status, including Chechen, Tat and Tshakur. The state is nicknamed "The Rainbow State" due to its large diversity.
 
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This is a very interesting TL so far! I’m curious, did Bashkortostan get expanded so that it bordered Kazakhstan? If so, why don’t they and the Volga-Ural republics get independence? Seems like a more sustainable state than Sakha or the purple country in the Kolyma/Kamchatka region.
 
This is a very interesting TL so far! I’m curious, did Bashkortostan get expanded so that it bordered Kazakhstan?
No; Kazakhstan picked up a chunk of Orenburg Oblast with a significant Kazakh minority during the Russian civil war.
If so, why don’t they and the Volga-Ural republics get independence? Seems like a more sustainable state than Sakha or the purple country in the Kolyma/Kamchatka region.
I might consider that. However, they are smack bang in the middle of Russia, which makes it slightly harder.
 
India at Boiling Point:The Events Leading to the Indian Civil War
Crosspost from MOTF 239: A House Divided:
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India at Boiling Point: The Events Leading to the Indian Civil War
In 2040, India looked set to be the next global superpower. Many of its biggest rivals had succumbed to civil war: America in 2025, Russia in 2026, China in the early 2030s. However, there were troubles brewing in the subcontinent that would lead to India falling into the same fate.
Taliban Insurgencies in Pakistan
Having taken control of Afghanistan in 2024, the Taliban then set its sights on on the fellow Pashtuns of Pakistan. The former Federally Administered Tribal Areas (or FATA), now split between the Pashto-majority states of Pakhtunkhwa and Khorasan, provided manpower for the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (also known as the Pakistani Taliban), and the Taliban government provided guns and money. The Pakistani Taliban aimed to overthrow the Pakistani government, and as of June 2040, control several districts in the border areas, and conduct occasional terrorist attacks in major cities.
Disputes over Kashmir
Ever since Partition in 1947, Kashmir had always been a sour point between India and Pakistan. Both countries claimed all of the region, but each only controlled part: Pakistan controlled Gilgit, Baltistan, and Azad Kashmir (1 on map), while India controlled Jammu, Kashmir, and Ladakh (5). In addition, both claimed the uninhabited Siachen Glacier (3), but neither controlled it. India also claimed the Shaksgam Valley (2) and Aksai Chin (4, 6) from Uyghuristan and Tibet. Religion played a major part in the dispute: whilst all of Pakistani Kashmir was overwhelmingly Muslim, Indian Kashmir was more religiously divided. Kashmir proper was mostly Muslim, Jammu was more Hindu, and Ladakh was Buddhist. Given the religious disparities between Kashmir and the (mostly Hindu) rest of India, Kashmir has frequently tried to secede; however, this has backfired, resulting in crackdowns on religion and Kashmiri culture. In 2020, the state of Jammu and Kashmir (then including Ladakh) was dissolved and replaced by the two union territories of Jammu and Kashmir and Ladakh. Since then, Jammu has been intensely Hinduized, and in 2038 granted statehood. Many Muslims in Jammu and Kashmir were still bitter and would like to become independent or join Pakistan.
Workers' Strikes
India is a major source of cheap labor to the West, as large companies can take advantage of low wages to produce goods cheaply. However, not all workers were content with living in poverty. Across India, there have been many strikes and peaceful protests by workers calling for higher pay and better living conditions. In Jan 1 2040, workers in a factory in Moradabad, Paschim Pradesh, refused to work, demanding increased pay; their demands were accepted. This was followed by more strikes and protests around India, many unsuccessful. Many Indian workers awaited the day the Revolution will come; fortunately for them, that day came soon.
Bengali and Maldives Refugee Crises
Climate change, the invisible terror created by man and ignored for long, hit in the worst places. Bangladesh, being unfortunate enough to sit on the delta and floodplains of two major rivers, the Ganges and Brahmaputra, was one of the worst affected. Flooding has always been a frequent fact of life in Bangladesh, but the unpredictable side effects of global warming made floods more frequent, more severe and less predictable. In the Sundarbans, slowly rising sea levels have claimed some coastal settlements. With more and more people's houses being destroyed or rendered uninhabitable, many became displaced and had to flee elsewhere. Many settled in northern Bengal, the Brahmaputra Valley and Barak Valley to the east, and the Ganges Valley to the west. However, some states, such as Jharkhand and Assam, had become annoyed with the influx of Bengali refugees and wanted to enact anti-immigration laws to keep them out. Fortunately for the refugees, the Indian constitution prevented such laws. In response, those states considered secession from India to form their own country.
A similar situation occurred with the Maldives, which had many of its islands sink under the waves. In 2039, the remaining population of the archipelago voted overwhelmingly to be annexed into India. Many fled to India (primarily Kerala and Tamil Nadu) or Sri Lanka, and have formed sizable Dhivehi communities there.
 
Currencies of the World 2050
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A map of the currencies in use in 2050. Some major ones are as follows:
  • American Dollar (AMD): After the Second American Civil War of 2025, the US dollar fell sharply and the world was plunged into a great recession. In an effort to restart the rump US's economy and bind the new states closer to each other, a new currency was introduced: the American Dollar. The first notes began circulating in 2031, and by 2050 many states in the Americas have already implemented it, or are planning to. Divided into 100 cents.
  • Euro (EUR): The official currency of the United States of Europe, as well as some other states in Europe and Siberia. Replaced the US dollar as the currency for trading internationally. Divided into 100 cents.
  • Afro (AFR): The African Union's answer to the euro. The first notes began circulating in 2044, and by 2050 every country in Africa except two (Maghrebia and Egypt) uses it. Divided into 100 cents.
  • Dinar (DNR): The Baghdad Accord's answer to the euro, based off of the historic gold dinar. The first notes began circulating in 2035, and by 2050 every member of the Baghdad Accord uses it. Divided into 100 dirhams.
  • Indian Rupee (INR): Used in India and some neighboring states. Undivided.
  • Chinese Dollar (CND): Used by the current Chinese regime, replacing the renminbi, and in neighboring breakaway states. Divided into 100 cents.
 
Looks cool!
Why do Maghrebia and the eastern Siberian countries use the Euro?
When was the Chinese Dollar introduced? Was that part of Li Keqiang's reforms?
Do I see that the Dutch government-in-exile use a currency other than the Euro? Which currency?
What are some exchange rates?
On a different note, what's the linguistic situation worldwide?
 
Looks cool!
Why do Maghrebia and the eastern Siberian countries use the Euro?
Because it's convenient.
When was the Chinese Dollar introduced? Was that part of Li Keqiang's reforms?
Li Keqiang's reforms have been retconned and replaced with the Second Chinese Civil War of 2031. The Chinese Dollar was introduced by the post-communist regime in 2036.
Do I see that the Dutch government-in-exile use a currency other than the Euro? Which currency?
Netherlands Antillean guilder, as OTL.
What are some exchange rates?
1 NAD = 1.34 EUR = 2.23 AFR = 1.18 DIN = 68.7 INR = 0.87 CND = 0.48 present USD
On a different note, what's the linguistic situation worldwide?
I'll make a map soon. In the meantime, here are a few more interesting bits:
- An intense de-Russianisation policy occured in the Russian Rim of the USE, except in the states that are already majority Russian. In Karelia, Estonia, Latvia, Belarus, Ukraine (except most of Crimea), Abkhazia, Georgia, Ossetia, Chechnya, and Dagestan, Russian was phased out of use and replaced with local languages, and cities with Russian names were renamed (Makhachkala -> Anzhi-Qala, Groznyy -> Sölƶa-Ġala, Vladikavkaz -> Dzawjeqaw, Petropavlovsk -> Petroskoi). Similarly, the Cyrillic alphabet was phased out of use.
- As a corollary of that, Dagestan, with its 14 different official languages, uses Simplified English (a simplified version of English instituted in the USE) as a lingua franca, most notably in Anzhi-Qala.
- Beringia speaks English, but writes it in Cyrillic.
- 60% of Sakhalin speaks Japanese.
 
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