Upcoming AH books

I feel like reading this thread isn't good for my brain for some reason.

Anyways, are there, like, really really good AH books you folks would suggest that are coming out soon (or are already out)?

P.S. Seems you folks're very strict in terms of plausibility. For goodness's sake, it's fiction! (It is true that implausible scenarios annoy me sometimes, but I'll ignore the implausibility if the story is, like, really really good.)

P.P.S.
(stares at the cover which includes a tiny Bismarck shelling modern-day New York with a gigantic Empire State Building in the middle of the Financial District as a tiny, backwards, misplaced Statue of Liberty looks on)

I have questions.
I thought judging books from their covers was and is a bad idea.
 
I feel like reading this thread isn't good for my brain for some reason.

Anyways, are there, like, really really good AH books you folks would suggest that are coming out soon (or are already out)?

P.S. Seems you folks're very strict in terms of plausibility. For goodness's sake, it's fiction! (It is true that implausible scenarios annoy me sometimes, but I'll ignore the implausibility if the story is, like, really really good.)

P.P.S.

I thought judging books from their covers was and is a bad idea.
Especially SciFi covers...
 
P.S. Seems you folks're very strict in terms of plausibility. For goodness's sake, it's fiction! (It is true that implausible scenarios annoy me sometimes, but I'll ignore the implausibility if the story is, like, really really good.)
True, it's fiction, but alternate history is a very specific genre that panders to a very specific group of people, namely people interested in history, so we want to see what our world could look like.

There is a reason why some alternate historians don't like involving aliens and time travel in alternate history, because those two things have nothing to do with history. If you want to make stories involving aliens or time travel, that's fine, but don't call it alternate history.

Case in point: Does anyone remember AHH's book, the Atlantropa Articles? While it was a good book, I would hardly call it 'alternate history'. It is more of a post-apocalyptic story involving Nazis.


Isn't alternate history a subcategory of scifi?
I like to think of alternate history and science fiction as two separate genres.
 
P.S. Seems you folks're very strict in terms of plausibility. For goodness's sake, it's fiction! (It is true that implausible scenarios annoy me sometimes, but I'll ignore the implausibility if the story is, like, really really good.)
I'd actually agree, which why "audacious" AH that just takes an incredible/novel premise and runs with it has grown on me, even if the execution is flawed. However...

1: Plausible or not, the classic "ACW/WW2 changed outcome" AH is incredibly common and thus rightfully viewed as cliche by itself.
2: It's sometimes (but not always) a "brown M&M" that illustrates the rest of the story didn't have that much attention paid to it either.
 
The premise looks like a pop-AH cliche mashup.
Yeah. Usually I'm of the "you be you" school of letting writers explore whatever they wish to explore, cliches or not, but that mostly applies to amateurs and folks yearning to tell a story to get it out of their system regardless of quality or plausiblity. This seems like some kind of madlib of AH without any thought to consequences or research. Once again, I have absolutely nothing against Confeds and Nazis being in the same AH story, and if people want to write that, I do not wish to discourage, but this just seems a bit lazy.
 
Did I say ‘this week’?

Well, it’s finally this Sunday!

I am pleased to announce that after several years and repeated requests from my English-speaking comrades, ‘Au Bord de l’Abîme’ is finally released in English and becomes ‘At the Edge of the Abyss’.


Here is the blurb:



And here is the cover:



The book is available on Amazon in Paperback and Kindle format (There are two links at the moment because the pages have not yet been merged). You can read some excerpts on Amazon.

I allow myself to tag some embers whoe were waiting for it: @Hindustani Person @ST15RM @EbolaMan131


At the Edge of the Abyss is not a classic alternate history novel. It is a chronicle of the period in question through articles, book excerpts or web pages. All fictional, of course. The book also contains about a hundred illustrative elements (maps, flags, illustrations, portraits).


Some News :

As I expected, sales of the English version of Cycle 1 more or less caught up with those of the French version. The reason is simple not new, alternate histories is read more by English speakers than by French speakers.

I continue to work on Cycle 3 in French, as well as spin-off novels. However, please note that Cycle 2 (of which I am particularly proud) is planned to be translated into English. I hope that this translation will be available before the end of the year.

In the meantime you can find Cycle 1 and 2 in French and Cycle 1 in English.
 
I'd actually agree, which why "audacious" AH that just takes an incredible/novel premise and runs with it has grown on me, even if the execution is flawed. However...

1: Plausible or not, the classic "ACW/WW2 changed outcome" AH is incredibly common and thus rightfully viewed as cliche by itself.
2: It's sometimes (but not always) a "brown M&M" that illustrates the rest of the story didn't have that much attention paid to it either.
1. Yeah you are right. I am trying to avoid that in my own book. From what I seen of the reviews of Cody's novel, the book seems very flawed.
2.Depends on how you illustrate it.
 
Top