Is there still any fast freight on NEC or that purely a passenger line?
There are mail and express trains, particularly at night, and any freight movements that are impossible otherwise. (These mail and express trains use freight EMUs in a similar mold to the Japanese M250 series of EMUs and are designed with two dedicated types of freight cars, a box car for aircraft-size boxes and commercial RailBox and RailSkid containers and flatcars designed to exclusively to carry 20', 33', 40', 48' and 53' containers. These trains and designed to make speeds of up to 140 mph on the NEC.) All other movements on it are passengers, owing to it's huge number of users.

Amtrak, Via Rail and Auto-Train all use the NEC, with Amtrak's services on the NEC being divided into three classes, those being the fastest Acela Express services, the faster (and limited-stop) Metroliner services, the luxury Royal Blue Service and the all-stop Northeast Regional trains, as well as a long list of long-distance trains. Via's services are the Maple Leaf, Diplomat and Fleur de Lis from Toronto, Ottawa and Montreal respectively, while Auto Train's long-distance services use the NEC between Foxboro, MA and New Haven, CT and south of Trenton, NJ (it uses the Poughkeepsie route and the former L&NE to bypass New York, which while not strictly necessary - Auto-Train uses specially-built autoracks and passenger cars to fit inside NEC loading gauge - is done to make it easier for the company, and allow it to have a terminal in Maybrook, NY, for passengers from New York to head to Florida on Auto-Train trains), some trains off of the Keystone Corridor and Wyoming Valley Line go to New York, some off of the Empire Corridor go to Philadelphia, Baltimore or Washington and of course is the trains of the MBTA (Boston), CT Rail (Connecticut), Metro-North (New York area), NJ Transit (New Jersey), SEPTA (Philadelphia), MARC (Maryland, but MARC now runs as far as Washington and Wilmington) and Virginia Rail Express (which now has trains running to Baltimore-Washington Airport) running on the corridor.

This traffic density is also why the entire NEC, many of its closest lines (including the Empire Corridor, Hartford Line, Wyoming Valley Line, Keystone Corridor and Commonwealth Corridor) are entirely grade-separated, which is the case with the NEC all the way to its current end point in Raleigh, NC.
If the latter, which routes does conrail use for freight in the Northeast?
Conrail has two primary freight bypasses south of New York, one using the Chesapeake Bay Bridge-Tunnel from Norfolk, VA and then the former PRR to Wilmington, DE, this line then swinging across the Delaware River south of the NEC to Carneys Point, NJ and then sticking to the New Jersey side to Newark, Elizabeth and Bayonne, the other connecting to Chessie System at Hagerstown and Frederick, Maryland, the Hagerstown line going to Harrisburg (and the Pennsylvania Main Line) while the Frederick route goes to Lancaster, PA, and uses what were PRR secondaries to get around Philadelphia to the north. As the B&O in the TheMann Universe bought the Reading and CNJ the Amtrak exclusivity on the NEC leaves Conrail at a bit of a disadvantage in this regard (as Chessie has the former B&O, RDG and CNJ route to New York), but the formation of Conrail led to a number of line transfers, benefitting both The Cat and Big Blue. North of New York, Conrail owns the freight route carved out of the New Haven and Lehigh and New England (the Lehigh and Hudson River is now part of Chessie) and the line from Maybrook and Campbell Hall to New Haven as well as the (huge) South Boston Freight Terminal is joint territory. (The PRR and B&O had a similar agreement, and a new bridge at Poughkeepsie was built in the 1960s, this track being a triple-track one. The old bridge was retired from train service in 1981 and has been a pedestrian walkway since 1986.) Chessie has freight operations on the former New Haven freight route via Middletown, Willimantic, Plainfield, East Providence and Brockton, while Conrail runs off the joint route at Shelton and runs its freight route to Boston via Waterbury, Hartford, Putnam, Blackstone and Millville.

The overall result is that Conrail and Chessie are distinct competitors across the Northeast, with New York Central a competitor north of New York and the Erie Lackawanna east of New York, as well as the NYC's South Pennsylvania Division, which runs from Connellsville to Philadelphia. The massive Manhattan Express Terminal (the former St. John's Terminal, which was expanded in the early 1960s), the High Line (still used for freight train service here) and its line up to the joint line at Pawling, NY are owned by the New York Terminal Company, which is jointly owned by Conrail, Chessie and New York Central and is used by all three of them. (Erie Lackawanna, Canadian National and Canadian Pacific serve New York from facilities on the New Jersey side of the Hudson.) Freight service to Long Island is provided by limited services via the Tunnels to Penn Station (no hazardous materials are allowed here for obvious reasons) and via the Hells Gate Bridge, Conrail operating services on the latter across that bridge to New Haven and the Joint Line. The NYTC is entirely electrified for obvious reasons and the Manhattan Express Terminal here is a six-story terminal at the south end of the High Line, with extensive parcel and refrigerator and freezer facilities for the shipping of food, which is a major part of its operations. (It also means fishing boats regularly go to the adjacent terminal the Hudson, and the Hudson Square seafood market is one of New York's largest.)
 
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I presume you decided to adapt my idea for a Western Maryland extension to Philly?
Nope. This is Vanderbilt's planned South Pennsylvania Railroad that was never finished IOTL that was meant to be a direct competitor to the Pennsylvania, built after the PRR started building the West Shore Line to Albany. Here both were built - today the South Pennsylvania RR is part of the NYC's Keystone South Division and the West Shore Line is Conrail's Hudson Subdivision - and in the world of the Three Amigos thinks shook out a lot earlier than OTL, the region was down to a handful of players by the mid-1950s. CNJ and Reading became part of the B&O, EL built a "super railroad" across Pennsylvania to act as its primary main line (its ex-Erie and DL&W routes across Southern New York remain in service, though) and the New Haven was split between the PRR and B&O in the 1950s. The PRR was the central player of Conrail (along with the Norfolk and Western, Boston and Maine and several roads in the Midwest), and so as of 2023 the Northeast as four primary competitors, those being Conrail, Chessie System, Erie Lackawanna and New York Central, all of which have their strengths and weaknesses. The former New York, Ontario and Western (and an extension of it) is the Canadian National's Empire State Division and the Lehigh Valley became part of Canadian Pacific in the 1920s, keeping its identity mostly intact until the 1970s.
 
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Nope. This is Vanderbilt's planned South Pennsylvania Railroad that was never finished IOTL that was meant to be a direct competitor to the Pennsylvania, built after the PRR started building the West Shore Line to Albany. Here both were built - today the South Pennsylvania RR is part of the NYC's Keystone South Division and the West Shore Line is Conrail's Hudson Subdivision - and in the world of the Three Amigos thinks shook out a lot earlier than OTL, the region was down to a handful of players by the mid-1950s. CNJ and Reading became part of the B&O, EL built a "super railroad" across Pennsylvania to act as its primary main line (its ex-Erie and DL&W routes across Southern New York remain in service, though) and the New Haven was split between the PRR and B&O in the 1950s. The PRR was the central player of Conrail (along with the Norfolk and Western, Boston and Maine, Western Maryland and several roads in the Midwest), and so as of 2023 the Northeast as four primary competitors, those being Conrail, Chessie System, Erie Lackawanna and New York Central, all of which have their strengths and weaknesses. The former New York, Ontario and Western (and an extension of it) is the Canadian National's Empire State Division and the Lehigh Valley became part of Canadian Pacific in the 1920s, keeping its identity mostly intact until the 1970s.
I did know about most of the things you mentioned, but I thought the Western Maryland was part of the NYC and not Conrail.

Also, would I be right to assume the Wabash became part of Conrail and the NKP went to the Erie Lackawanna?

Either way, interesting to know those two rail projects actually got built in the Amigoes universe. I had considered using those ideas among the other unused railway ideas for my own posts in the past.
 
South Pennsylvania Railroad
Specifically, one idea I had was for the railroad to exist and eventually add on the Maryland & Pennsylvania (the OTL "Ma & PA") to get to Baltimore.

I also had the idea to take inspiration from a guy I knew on Deviantart to create a railway that would be another NE player linking Philadelphia and the Wyoming Valley like the CNJ/Reading did.
 
I did know about most of the things you mentioned, but I thought the Western Maryland was part of the NYC and not Conrail.
*looks back*

You are correct, yes. Correction to be made.
Also, would I be right to assume the Wabash became part of Conrail and the NKP went to the Erie Lackawanna?
NKP did end up as part of EL, Wabash is part of Chessie System, with an agreement - CN can use Wabash rails to get to St. Louis and Kansas City (this annoys the Santa Fe to no end....at first) in return for EL getting rights on CN from Buffalo to Toronto and its industries. Both sides liked that arrangement, CN liked it even more when Santa Fe started using them to haul loads to Canada from Chicago.
Either way, interesting to know those two rail projects actually got built in the Amigoes universe. I had considered using those ideas among the other unused railway ideas for my own posts in the past.
The reason they were stopped was because the rivalry between the NYC and PRR that made those happen was quashed by commercial interests who were worried about the competition ruining both firms. Here, the issues are in fact the opposite, as the B&O goes a lot of places and Erie Lackawanna does as well, so both the NYC and PRR want the connections. Hence, West Shore Line and South Pennsylvania are built. The PRR initially wanted to use the Rutland to get to Montreal but the NYC's ownership of it scuttled that (the Rutland main north of Troy, NY would eventually become the genesis of the Amtrak Lake Champlain Division, which was upgraded into a HSR route in the 1960s and 1970s and is today the route for Amtrak's Vermonter and Ethan Allen Express runs as well as Via's Fleur de Lis and Diplomat) and as a result it would use EL to handle Montreal and Ottawa-bound traffic. Starting in the 1930s it would pay off big time as the Pennsylvania steel industry started being able to buy Canadian iron ore, and thus Labrador iron ore began to be hauled by CN to Montreal and then the PRR, using EL trackage rights between Montreal and Albany, would haul it the rest of the way. This was a lucrative business all the way into Conrail times.

For the NYC, the South Pennsylvania's big prize was having access to the merchandise traffic between Pittsburgh and Philadelphia, but the company also did well hauling anthracite towards the Midwest. The company didn't make that much effort to attack the PRR's passenger services along its main line - they did exist, but the PRR always had the upper hand - and today the line is strictly a freight route as passenger trains use the Pennsylvania Main Line for the most part, that line being electrified in the 1960s and the wires being used by Amtrak from the day they opened. (Yes, this did mean GG1s did take passenger trains to Pittsburgh on occasion, and the PRR bought over 200 E44s instead of 66 as IOTL.) Today, the NYC has long since also electrified the South Pennsylvania RR, using the hydroelectric and nuclear power of the region.
 
Since TheMann got the ball running with the South Pennsylvania Railroad and keeping the West Shore as part of the PRR, I thought I'd give my take on some ideas for unused railroads and how I'd meld them into the Boyd-verse. (speaking of which, since I preferred the idea of the D&H staying with Canadian Pacific, it DOES give me a new idea for the West Shore so the Lehigh Valley can be part of Conrail)

One railroad is the St. Louis, Arkansas, & Pacific Railroad. It was planned as a trunk line from St. Louis to Paris, Texas in 1913 but only got around to planning part of the route in northern Arkansas. My idea was that in my TL, the railroad is proposed quite a bit earlier and does indeed reach St. Louis to Paris. Then however, it starts building and acquiring lines that enable the creation of various secondary lines, extending their reach west to Wichita, Kansas and Tulsa, Oklahoma. After losing the Frisco in the 1890s, the AT&SF looks to the StLA&P for an alternate link to the Lower Midwest. A partnership between the two (and an extended version of the Missouri & North Arkansas to Memphis), leads to the StLA&P becoming part of the ATSF by the 90s.

The Kansas City Southern gets the lion's share of the OTL unused rail lines in the region however. These lines given them a trunk like that splits from the line at De Queen, Arkansas, runs south to Paris, Texas then continues running south to Houston. Another TTL line runs from Port Arthur, Texas through Houston all the way to the Mexican border at Presidio, with additional lines linking to the border at Laredo and Eagle Pass.
 
[3] The 2-10-0s CPR uses are big ones meant for heavy freight service, with the R4 class being former Lehigh Valley units that became part of the CPR fleet when the railroad was acquired in 1926
Would I be correct to imagine something similar to the PRR I1sa, L&NE F-1, and the Western Maryland I-2?
 
Would I be correct to imagine something similar to the PRR I1sa, L&NE F-1, and the Western Maryland I-2?
The R3 is closer to the F-1 (and fairly similar to OTL), while the R4 is much closer to the I1sa. Canadian Pacific R4s were huge-boilered machines, being equipped with a few unusual details (coffin-type feedwater heaters, Baker valve gear when the vast majority of CPR engines used conventional Walschaerts, double funnels) whereas the R3 are as OTL. Both classes of Decapods used lead counterweights to reduce the problems with rough riding that made the I1sa the "unholy terror of the PRR". CPR crews initially weren't big fans of them because of their rough riding, but all came to admit that the R3 and R4 classes were powerful, especially the latter with its nearly 90,000 lbs of tractive effort. The R4s were nicknamed "bulkers" by CPR crews for the jobs they almost always did and "Pennsylvania Specials" by Western crews later in their lives. One R4, #4404, was converted as a test bed for Bagnall-Price valve gear, but it was the only one converted for cost reasons.

The R4 class locomotives were originally ordered by the LVRR in the early 1920s and stayed on when the LV was bought by the CPR. They were never used in passenger or priority freight service for obvious reasons (they topped out at maybe 80 km/h, and even with lead counterweights they were not fun at medium speed or faster), but as drag freight engines they worked great. Many of the LV engines were retired as electrification of the ex-LV main between Buffalo and New York continued, but the R4s ended up being transferred to Western Canada in the early 1950s and lived out their lives in the Rockies as helper engines, in many cases replacing R3s, which often got sent out east for other jobs.
 
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@TheMann I was thinking more about when we used to brainstorm ideas for a 3' 6'' Rio Grande San Juan division for my own TL. Something I've considered is the possibility that if the Rio Grande were to still ditch it due to a standard gauge line to Farmington being built from Gallup, maybe we could have a longer Cumbres & Toltec railroad that runs the whole length from Antonito to Durango as a Class II or Class III.

Granted I am aware that this would require a major effort from local government, the D&RGW, and volunteers, but I think it's still something to think about.
 
^ Do bear in mind that doing that would mean completely re-engineering every inch of every line, would make building many of the branches to isolated places difficult (if not impossible) and you're gonna have to do the same to the Rio Grande Southern as well, as it would never work here.
 
^ Do bear in mind that doing that would mean completely re-engineering every inch of every line, would make building many of the branches to isolated places difficult (if not impossible) and you're gonna have to do the same to the Rio Grande Southern as well, as it would never work here.
To be fair I was thinking the Rio Grande Southern would eventually end up mostly abandoned in this scenario.

Speaking of which did the RGS end up standard gauge in your to too? If so what happened to it?
 
@TheMann what could've been done to make the Steam Turbines like the C&O M-1 or N&W Jawn Henry more successful?
The biggest thing there is to walk before you run, so to speak. Both the UP's GE-built steam turbines and the Baldwin-built ones the C&O built were too advanced for their own good (especially the former), and all three had a common problem in that coal dust (which is flammable and damaging to electrical components even when it doesn't burn) and water got everywhere on all of the steam turbines, which was in itself the largest mechanical issue all three had.

The N&W 2300 (the Jawn Henry) IMO had the best chance of working from a design standpoint, but even that has an issue in that by the time it was built the economics of diesels from a maintenance perspective had been proven. EMD diesels were famous for being phenomenally reliable even then and because they were all built exactly the same maintaining something even as complex as a diesel locomotive was fairly straightforward. Alco figured this out but Baldwin never really did, so if you want the idea it work you need them to be a part of GE or EMD early enough that their better electrical components and standardization could be employed on the Jawn Henry. Once you have that (and have kicked the problems of those electrical components bring damaged by coal dust and water, which is doable IMO) figured out, you need to figure out a MU system so it can work with diesels if you're gonna make these in any number.

That done and the concept proven, then you make a smaller series of these meant to integrate with a railroad. Easier access to components that might need to be replaced in regular service, as well as improving the power of the design. Sticking with the Jawn Henry, job one is integrating the water tender into the unit, preferably with powered trucks to take advantage of the weight of the water tender when it's filled - you will need that tender here - for tractive effort. Sort out the at-times-troublesome boiler controls and make sure the unit's MU system works perfectly, then go put them to them. As Babcock and Wilcox makes improvements for their boilers get them and use them to increase their power. A 2300 with boiler improvements to the degree of making 6000 hp (or more) and with a continuous tractive effort of 200,000 lb that is durable and reliable is gonna get the attention of a lot of railroads, particularly heavy coal haulers that don't have to worry too much about supplies of good boiler water. The latter problem means I don't see a lot of Western roads being fans of the idea, but the N&W, C&O, Pennsy and L&N would all be very likely buyers.
 
The biggest thing there is to walk before you run, so to speak. Both the UP's GE-built steam turbines and the Baldwin-built ones the C&O built were too advanced for their own good (especially the former), and all three had a common problem in that coal dust (which is flammable and damaging to electrical components even when it doesn't burn) and water got everywhere on all of the steam turbines, which was in itself the largest mechanical issue all three had.

The N&W 2300 (the Jawn Henry) IMO had the best chance of working from a design standpoint, but even that has an issue in that by the time it was built the economics of diesels from a maintenance perspective had been proven. EMD diesels were famous for being phenomenally reliable even then and because they were all built exactly the same maintaining something even as complex as a diesel locomotive was fairly straightforward. Alco figured this out but Baldwin never really did, so if you want the idea it work you need them to be a part of GE or EMD early enough that their better electrical components and standardization could be employed on the Jawn Henry. Once you have that (and have kicked the problems of those electrical components bring damaged by coal dust and water, which is doable IMO) figured out, you need to figure out a MU system so it can work with diesels if you're gonna make these in any number.

That done and the concept proven, then you make a smaller series of these meant to integrate with a railroad. Easier access to components that might need to be replaced in regular service, as well as improving the power of the design. Sticking with the Jawn Henry, job one is integrating the water tender into the unit, preferably with powered trucks to take advantage of the weight of the water tender when it's filled - you will need that tender here - for tractive effort. Sort out the at-times-troublesome boiler controls and make sure the unit's MU system works perfectly, then go put them to them. As Babcock and Wilcox makes improvements for their boilers get them and use them to increase their power. A 2300 with boiler improvements to the degree of making 6000 hp (or more) and with a continuous tractive effort of 200,000 lb that is durable and reliable is gonna get the attention of a lot of railroads, particularly heavy coal haulers that don't have to worry too much about supplies of good boiler water. The latter problem means I don't see a lot of Western roads being fans of the idea, but the N&W, C&O, Pennsy and L&N would all be very likely buyers.
Sounds almost like what the ACE 3000 project should've been.
 
Sounds almost like what the ACE 3000 project should've been.
The ACE 3000 had a good idea and made it work in the best way possible. Anything with electric drive is going to run out of power at high speeds but be able to get much more weight moving, which was the opposite of a steam engine. Rowland and the engineers knew that and as such designed the locomotive for the ability to move fast freight at higher speeds. Had fuel prices not dropped like a brick in the 1980s the project may well have worked, as there was nothing in terms of engineering that caused issues. I suspect had it been built the ACE 3000 would have been absolutely bulletproof in service and highly capable.

Would it have replaced diesels in heavy freight service? No chance.

Would it have been an absolutely beastly locomotive for fast freight movements? More than likely yes. The 'coal pack' idea was kind of stupid if you ask me, but this thing but with a Porta boiler and drive design and only needing to go 70 mph (which is as fast as priority freights tend to go in any case) would probably be a superb fast freight engine. Of course, the issue of pollution from burning coal would still be an issue, and you would need to train maintenance crews for the thing, but I suspect once on the road and in revenue service an engineer seeing one of these things leading perishables, containers or piggybacks is probably gonna think "Ah good, I won't have to worry about power today...."
 
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The ACE 3000 had a good idea and made it work in the best way possible. Anything with electric drive is going to run out of power at high speeds but be able to get much more weight moving, which was the opposite of a steam engine. Rowland and the engineers knew that and as such designed the locomotive for the ability to move fast freight at higher speeds. Had fuel prices not dropped like a brick in the 1980s the project may well have worked, as there was nothing in terms of engineering that caused issues. I suspect had it been built the ACE 3000 would have been absolutely bulletproof in service and highly capable.

Would it have replaced diesels in heavy freight service? No chance.

Would it have been an absolutely beastly locomotive for fast freight movements? More than likely yes. The 'coal pack' idea was kind of stupid if you ask me, but this thing but with a Porta boiler and drive design and only needing to go 70 mph (which is as fast as priority freights tend to go in any case) would probably be a superb fast freight engine. Of course, the issue of pollution from burning coal would still be an issue, and you would need to train maintenance crews for the thing, but I suspect once on the road and in revenue service an engineer seeing one of these things leading perishables, containers or piggybacks is probably gonna think "Ah good, I won't have to worry about power today...."
Fair enough. Speaking of which, did the ACE 300 actually get built in your universe? I remember in an earlier iteration of it the BN did order some during the 2010s.
 
Decided to revise this idea to take it out of Canada and put it closer to home.

The South Mountain Railway O-1 Class 4-8-4s
Built: 1923 (original); 1939 (rebuild)
Number Built: 32 Total
Builder: Baldwin Locomotive Works (original); SM Carlisle Shops (rebuild)
Operated: 1920 - 1962

When railfans think of the 4-8-4 wheel configuration, they think mainly of locomotives that were speedy, powerful common workhorses, or something they think of the finest in express passenger steam traction. But being a locomotive meant almost exclusively for freight service, the SMRR O-1 was closer in nature to the Lehigh Valley "Wyomings", Reading & Central Jersey T-1s, and Western Maryland J-1 "Potomac" classes. To understand how these locomotives came into being, we must take a look at the history of the SMRR railway in the years before.

Built in the 1880s as a mainline through Pennsylvania's Southern Tier, the South Mountain Railroad ran from Pittsburgh and Wheeling to Carlisle, Pennsylvania via Jones Mills, Somerset, Bedford, and Everett. The line split at Carlisle to either run east to Philadelphia via York and Lancester, or reach Easton via Harrisburg, Bethel, and Allentown. Another extension south from York to Baltimore was achieved in the 1910s via the acquisition and upgrading of the Maryland & Pennsylvania Railroad. As virtually all of the traffic was freight - especially coal and bridge traffic - this meant that most of the railway's locomotives were big-boilered machines with low-speed, but high tractive effort.

The W-1 Class, the original form of these locomotives, were very much an example of this. Built by Baldwin in the 1920s, these locomotives were essentially derivatives of the USRA's 2-8-8-2 Mallet design. Indeed the only major differences were the inclusion of larger six-axle tenders. While they were remarkable haulers when first introduced, these locomotives would gradually fall out of favor as the SMRR looked to more efficient simple articulateds like their W-2 Class successors, which were closer in nature to the Rio Grande L-131 class, well as more conventional locomotives like the G-1 Class of USRA Heavy Santa Fes and the H-1 Class Decapods - which were derived from the PRR I1sa and Western Maryland I-2.

The buildup to World War II changed things, however. Now the SMRR needed a locomotive that was a lot faster than what had come before, but still had the needed amount of pull. Time and labor constraints meant that the SMRR couldn't spend time designing an entirely new locomotive, so the railroad decided to look at their two options: either purchase deirivatives of a pre-existing design - like how the PRR, CP, and CN all acquired variants of the C&O T-1 - or use pre-existing parts in a new locomotive. The SMRR decided to go with the latter option after consulting with Vernon L. Smith, who offered an idea he had previously considered presenting to the Atchison, Topeka, & Santa Fe when they were upgrading their HVM-1 Northerns (including the famous #3751). On April 22, 1940, two members of the W-1 Class, #2200 and #2205, were towed to the BLW plant in Eddystone. Under the watchful eye of both Smith and SMRR management, the locomotives both underwent major changes, starting with a new chassis for the boiler. When the two locomotives saw the outdoors again, they were very different indeed. Where the Mallets once stood now stood faster, but still plenty powerful 4-8-4s with 74-inch drivers, roller bearings, boxpok drive wheels, a single-piece welded frame, and Walscherts valve gear.

Once put to work back on the SMRR these locomotives proved themselves capable of their intended job of hauling more time-sensetive freight trains. Where the O-1s truly shined however was on the military supply trains True to form, all 30 of the other W-1s would be rebuilt at the railroad's own Carlisle shops between 1940 and 1941. During the build up to the liberation of Europe, most of the O-1s continued to handle military trains, while the articulated and ten-coupled steamers were left to continue handling long trains of coal and other rare earths.

The O-1 class continued to serve their railway wells into the early 1960s. However, it was clear that the diesel was simply the future of the SMRR and retirements began in 1958. The last locomotive, #2216, was striken from the SMRR roster in September 1962. Fortunately however, #2205, one of the first two rebuilds, is preserved and is a static display piece at the Railroad Museum of Pennsylvania in Strasburg. A second O-1, #2213, also still exists at the ex-NYO&W yards near Scranton, and is undergoing evaluation as potential member of the Steamtown NHS excursion fleet alongside locomotives like Boston & Maine #3713, Reading #2102, and Canadian National #3254.

OOC: Loosely inspired by @TheMann's idea to have the South Pennsylvania Railroad still exist, I decided to extend the idea to have my TL feature both it and the South Mountain Railroad exist as one company. Also decided to include the Ma & Pa as an expansion (albeit one that I realistically see being abandoned at some point).
 
^ Wheeling and Pittsburgh to Easton and Philadelphia....interesting. Definitely a line for bridge traffic over the Appalachians from the NYC and NKP on the west side of the Appalachians to the LV and probably CNJ on the east side at Easton, the Western Maryland at Baltimore (and maybe branching south via Frederick to meet the B&O's junction point at Point of Rocks, thus allowing Washington service?) and presumably somebody else in the Lehigh Valley area. Unless you have access to the docks in Philadelphia I'm not sure what use that line is going to be aside from carrying coal to Philadelphia because the PRR is going to swallow up all of the interchange traffic whole as their route is likely shorter. If you want to use the Ma and Pa route as a freight conduit you'll need to completely rebuild it to deal with the fact that it is as long as it is - the PRR line between the two is over 20 miles shorter even before you get to upgrading. If it were me, I'd dump the Ma and Pa route and build from scratch from York to Baltimore and give the PRR a real run for their money, and make Lancaster a junction point for trains to Wilmington as well as Philadelphia. Do this and then do an interchange deal with the NYC or NKP in Pittsburgh or Wheeling and you're off to the races.
 
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