TLIAD: Shuffling The Deck



Well, well, well. Look who’s back.

Hello again!

Shouldn’t you be lugging newspapers around Crawley?

Croydon. I’m from Croydon. And I do other things as well.

What other things? Certainly not ‘writing updates for Lavender’, by the look of it.

Oof. Fair cop. Anyway, this is a little side project to get our juices flowing.

Ugh. The title sounds dull. Wait a minute, did you say ‘our juices’?

Hellooo!

I’m so sorry about him.

Mine’s worse, don’t worry.

Good to be working with you on this, Jack.

Likewise, Tom! It’s going to be cracking.

Why does he talk like he’s mental?

Ssh! He’s from the north.

Why does he talk like Ed Miliband?

Heh, good one.

Good what? I didn’t say anything.

Stop being mean!

Am I being mean? Sorry!

Oh, for pity’s sake.

What?!

Look, you can hear your internal monologue, Jack can hear his, but you can’t hear each other’s.

Oh, right. Jack, we can’t hear each other’s internal monologues.

We, however, can both hear you. And we can communicate with each other.

That doesn’t seem fair.

Right, that’s enough. Behave yourselves. We’ve got 24 hours to do this thing, and unlike certain others, we’re going to do our damnedest to get this done in a day.

Jack cheated.

No, I didn’t!

You didn’t what?

Jack cheated, apparently.

How did you ‘cheat’?!

I… I may have done the graphics in advance. I’m busy tonight, I didn’t want to hold us up.

Oh, that’s fine.

Tom cheated too.

Tom’s internal monologue says he cheated too.

I’m sure whatever he did is fine.

Well, I wrote a bit of this in advance.

Everyone does that, guys.

Hi, The Red!

We were just having a bit of trouble with our internal monologues.

Oh, I’ve got one of those.

Предками данная мудрость народная!
Славься, страна! Мы гордимся тобой!


Fucking hell.

The Red isn’t even involved with this one.

I was just passing by, I’m off to have a couple of Enochs with a colleague.

Chaps, shall we just get on with it?

Go for it.

Yes.

Yes, please.

Партия Ленина!

Yes.

Right. It was a cold, dark night in 1942...​
 
Lovely stuff! Glad to see that you've outdone me and Techdread with the internal monologue argument! :D
 
I had to read the introduction about three times before I understood properly. I look forward to this with enthusiasm and anticipation.
 


Winston Churchill (Conservative leading Wartime Coalition)
The King of Clubs


The Martyr Who Saw Britain Through Her Darkest Hour

Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill led one of the most extraordinary lives of the first half of the 20th century. Having served as a soldier, journalist and cabinet minister by the end of the First World War, he became a serial rebel - defecting from the Conservative Party, to the Liberals, and back again - becoming notorious for his stance on the Gold Standard, his ill-fated attempt to defeat the Ottoman Empire at Gallipoli, and even mooting the idea of using live ammunition against striking Welsh miners.

In what little spare time he had, Churchill was also an accomplished historian, writer and amateur artist.

A divisive figure in the governments of the 1920s, his actions as Chancellor and during the General Strike discredited him in the eyes of many working class Britons. The national governments of the early 1930s were also not friends to Churchill, who found himself marginalised as they marched unknowingly toward war. When Appeasement was outed as a catastrophic failure in 1939, Churchill was at last invited to return to the Cabinet by the ailing Neville Chamberlain.

Following the humiliation of the disastrous expedition to Narvik, in which the allied armies had been unable to prevent the fall of Norway to the armed forces of the Reich, it was Churchill who was invited by The King to form a Coalition Government - narrowly pipping the experienced, if tainted, Lord Halifax to the Premiership. Magnanimous in victory, and keen to keep the Conservative Party on side, he made sure to find a prominent seat in the Cabinet for Neville Chamberlain - the man he had just ousted.

Churchill quickly moved to protect the British Isles themselves, coming too late to save the Low Countries, France and even the Channel Islands, from Hitlerite Germany. In his welcoming speech to the Cabinet after moving into Downing Street, he famously stated “I have nothing to offer but blood, toil, tears and sweat” - a phrase that would later be immortalised on his memorial in Westminster Abbey.

The Churchill years were a grim time for the Anti-Fascist movement - on all fronts, land, sea and air - Britain stood alone on the continent, whilst the Japanese Empire moved against the colonial powers in East Asia. In the darkest hour of the British Empire, it was to Winston Churchill that the public turned to, and in him, they found the assertive, defiant ‘Bulldog Spirit’ that epitomised the opening years of the most destructive war in history.

It was under Churchill - who had aggressively called for Home Defence and the promotion of early Radar systems whilst in exile on the backbenchers - that the Nazi menace was called to heel in the skies above the South Downs, it was under Churchill that the Soviet Union and the United States entered the war against Germany, and it was under Churchill that Britain’s cities endured the worst of the Blitz. In all of this, Churchill remained in London, directing the war effort (he also sat as Minister of Defence) and bilateral relations with other heads of government - as well as with President Roosevelt and Marshal Stalin.

As the year 1942 dawned, Churchill and the British public had more reason to be optimistic about the future of Europe than at any time since the invasion of Poland. Across the Channel, plans for an invasion of Great Britain had been shelved in the face of RAF intransigence, across the Atlantic, the United States had finally entered the war after the Japanese attack on Pearl Habour, whilst the Red Army had turned away Von Bock on the outskirts of Moscow.

With time, what world Churchill could have built in the post-war climate is matter of counterfactual speculation. Would he - as many assumed - have wilted in adjusting to a world where Britain had lost an Empire, but gained little else? Certainly, by 1942, there was little left of the firebrand radical that had helped to see in the Liberal Reforms of the Asquith years, nor was there a man who would have quietly gone into retirement. Churchill was a political creature, and at a New Years’ Eve reception at Chequers, he joked to the American Ambassador, John Gilbert Winard, that “I shall only leave Downing Street feet first.”

This was to prove sadly prophetic. Ten months later, whilst inspecting a battalion on Salisbury Plain, a faulty shell detonated, killing six men outright (including the unfortunate Under-Secretary for War, the Lord Croft) as well as critically injuring Churchill himself. With medical technology still in comparative infancy, little could be done for the aging Prime Minister, and he expired shortly after noon on 26th October.

At his state funeral two weeks later (held with all possible pomp and ceremony, despite wartime rationing) - his successor; the young, brilliant and charismatic Foreign Secretary who had followed him into exile during the 1930s - eulogised for many.

“Winston Churchill was a man who epitomised the idea of England. In his leadership, he fought against the worst elements of humanity and paid with his life. However, whilst we come here today to mourn, we also come to celebrate the life and work of a public servant who defended those who could not stand up for themselves. The forces of Nazism have suffered a great defeat in North Africa - and the steel and shell that beat them back was foundered with the heart and sweat of the man who established the machinery required to defeat them.

It is to England that Winston Churchill was born, and it is to England that Winston Churchill will be remembered.

With this is our minds, it is also to Winston Churchill that the tide of history has finally begun to turn against the grim apparatus of Nazi rule. This is not the end, it is not even the beginning of the end, but it is - perhaps - the end of the beginning.”

As Anthony Eden dismounted the pulpit in Westminster Abbey, he was one of the few people in the great nave not to have tears in his eyes.

The Churchill Era was over, and the Eden Era had begun.

Today, Winston Churchill is immortalised as a courageous and selfless public servant. To be called a ‘Churchill’ is among the highest accolades in modern British politics. It conjures up a sense of foresight - thanks to Churchill’s stand against appeasement and its tragic vindication - and of tireless sacrifice. ‘A Churchillian exit’ is today a somewhat dark metaphor for a statesman’s death, resignation or retirement when the country needs him most.​
 
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Thande

Donor
Very interesting start.

An ignominious end for Churchill - I wonder if the government would try to spin it as the result of a cowardly German assassin's sabotage of the shell or something to rile the people up, especially seeing as there's likely no way to prove it one way or the other what happened.
 
And one wonders how foreign policy will change as a result. Will indpendence or greater autonomy be offered for assisting more in the war effort?
 
Very good, just one tiny trivial issue to point out. You refer to him as the King of Spades, but on the card, he is the King of Clubs.
 
Very interesting start.

An ignominious end for Churchill - I wonder if the government would try to spin it as the result of a cowardly German assassin's sabotage of the shell or something to rile the people up, especially seeing as there's likely no way to prove it one way or the other what happened.

There was an incident very similar to this that Churchill narrowly avoided (Hitler avoided a similar fate in OTL - if I remember correctly, EdT used it to great effect in "A Greater Britain), shells really did seem to have the annoying habit of being very sensitive when they were supposed to be blanks - Nicholas II and the rest of the Imperial Family were nearly blown up when a battleship fired the wrong sort during the Blessing of Waters one Easter.

I imagine that a lot of propaganda will be used on either side of the war ITTL, obviously, there are merits and problems with spinning it as an assassination for both sides - nevertheless, I am sure that it will be fond source of speculation for conspiracy theorists for many decades to come!

And one wonders how foreign policy will change as a result. Will indpendence or greater autonomy be offered for assisting more in the war effort?

You shall have to wait and see - the theme that we are going for is already hinted at in the artwork and the title (I haven't had this much fun on Photoshop for ages) but a couple of Prime Ministers in should be enough for you to see what we are going for.

Very good, just one tiny trivial issue to point out. You refer to him as the King of Spades, but on the card, he is the King of Clubs.

D'oh! We are doing this on a GoogleDoc and things like this sometimes happen - I only have the image links, not the images themselves uploaded, so I should really have double checked. There is a slight patten to the cards, but not a hugely important one.
 
You shall have to wait and see - the theme that we are going for is already hinted at in the artwork and the title (I haven't had this much fun on Photoshop for ages) but a couple of Prime Ministers in should be enough for you to see what we are going for.
Stab in the dark based purely on the title but minor Cabinet Ministers end up in power?
 
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